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Boards from floor isolation foam instead of wood

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  • emet.cormon@village.uunet.be
    Making boards out of wood/multiplex have several drawbacks: .Lack of volume .Fixing scoop-rockerline .Rails or bevels in the bottom are not possible The use of
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 2, 2001
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      Making boards out of wood/multiplex have several drawbacks:
      .Lack of volume
      .Fixing scoop-rockerline
      .Rails or bevels in the bottom are not possible

      The use of floor isolation foam has several advantages:
      .thickness to choose from inventory
      .bending the foamboard into the scoop-rockerline and fixing it with
      epoxy and glass fiber
      .floor isolation is made off closed cell foam, which doesn't suck
      water at all

      1) Buy a floor isolation foam - thickness to choose yourself
      2) The length is a problem, as most popular available lengths are
      shorter than the average board
      But it is possible to glue to the back and the front a foot length
      of foam in order to get the needed length
      3) Cut out the outline of the board
      4) Mill out the wanted rails or bevels in the bottom while the board
      is still flat! Much easier !
      5) Shape the deck
      6) Plug in:glue in the inserts needed for footstraps, leachline and
      fins: in most cases some piece of wood or plastic
      7) Take a good board: copy the scoop-rocker line to two strips of
      wood in order to have 2 identical profiles
      8) Make a hole in the middle of the board and insert a wire with a
      knot.
      9) Put the board onto the 2 strips of wood
      10) Pull the wire downward so the board gets the desired scoop-rocker
      line and fix the wire so the board stays in place and shape.
      11) Epoxy and glass the deck (3 layers)
      12) Cut off the unnecessary glass
      13) Let it harden out for a night
      14) Cut of the wire, theb oard has now accepted the scoop-rocker line
      15) Turn the board around
      16) Take some time to neatly cut of all unnecessary glass and epoxy
      17) Glass the bottom (2 layers) using epoxy
      18) Let it harden out in a warm place
      19) Finish it by sanding the bottom where needed
      20) Mount footstraps, leach, fins

      Advantages:
      .Using a known scoop-rockerline with no shaping needed
      .Volume
      .Painting is not needed as the foam doesn't suck water
      .Complete flat bottom
      .Rails can be milled out when the board is still flat
      .Relatively fast construction
    • kitebord@pacbell.net
      ... Couldn t those drawbacks be reduced (or even eliminated) with several layers of thinner plywood? At least the rocker should be more stable when multi
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 2, 2001
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        --- In kitesurf@y..., emet.cormon@v... wrote:

        > Making boards out of wood/multiplex have several drawbacks:
        > .Lack of volume
        > .Fixing scoop-rockerline
        > .Rails or bevels in the bottom are not possible

        Couldn't those drawbacks be reduced (or even eliminated) with several
        layers of thinner plywood? At least the rocker should be more stable
        when multi layers are bent & then bonded together (glued with a bit
        more curve than desired, since they'll "bounce back" a bit).

        > .floor isolation is made off closed cell foam, which doesn't suck
        > water at all ...
        > 2) The length is a problem, as most popular available lengths are
        > shorter than the average board
        > But it is possible to glue to the back and the front a foot length

        Maybe consider a single glue seam at the center, or closed
        cell "extruded" polystyrene foam as I've seen used in wall insulation.

        > 4) Mill out the wanted rails or bevels in the bottom while the
        board
        > is still flat!

        Could be done with multi-layer wood, although the bottom layer would
        have to be at least as thick as the final bottom shape (1/4" for 1/4"
        channels)

        > 6) Plug in:glue in the inserts needed for footstraps, leachline and
        > fins: in most cases some piece of wood or plastic...
        > 11) Epoxy and glass the deck (3 layers)
        > 12) Cut off the unnecessary glass...
        > 16) Take some time to neatly cut of all unnecessary glass and epoxy
        > 17) Glass the bottom (2 layers) using epoxy...
        > 19) Finish it by sanding the bottom where needed

        These steps are not needed for a wood board, which is part of what
        makes it so appealing. What makes wood appealing to me is that the
        shape can be experimentally altered after completion, by simply
        cutting/sanding some wood off & repainting.

        The foam core board will have a better strength-to-weight ratio
        though, but it might be hard to figure exactly the weight of cloth to
        use, since less needed if the fiber or resin is stronger (carbon vs
        glass, epoxy vs polyester).

        Mel
      • emet.cormon@village.uunet.be
        Well whatever, I still have windsurfboards build this way from 9/10 years ago and they still are good: lightweight and stiff. Remarkably the shape is getting
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 3, 2001
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          Well whatever,
          I still have windsurfboards build this way from 9/10 years ago and
          they still are good: lightweight and stiff.

          Remarkably the shape is getting back into 'shape', except for the
          footstraps which are a little bit too much to the front.

          Eddy
          --- In kitesurf@y..., kitebord@p... wrote:
          > --- In kitesurf@y..., emet.cormon@v... wrote:
          >
          > > Making boards out of wood/multiplex have several drawbacks:
          > > .Lack of volume
          > > .Fixing scoop-rockerline
          > > .Rails or bevels in the bottom are not possible
          >
          > Couldn't those drawbacks be reduced (or even eliminated) with
          several
          > layers of thinner plywood? At least the rocker should be more
          stable
          > when multi layers are bent & then bonded together (glued with a bit
          > more curve than desired, since they'll "bounce back" a bit).
          >
          > > .floor isolation is made off closed cell foam, which doesn't suck
          > > water at all ...
          > > 2) The length is a problem, as most popular available lengths are
          > > shorter than the average board
          > > But it is possible to glue to the back and the front a foot
          length
          >
          > Maybe consider a single glue seam at the center, or closed
          > cell "extruded" polystyrene foam as I've seen used in wall
          insulation.
          >
          > > 4) Mill out the wanted rails or bevels in the bottom while the
          > board
          > > is still flat!
          >
          > Could be done with multi-layer wood, although the bottom layer
          would
          > have to be at least as thick as the final bottom shape (1/4" for
          1/4"
          > channels)
          >
          > > 6) Plug in:glue in the inserts needed for footstraps, leachline
          and
          > > fins: in most cases some piece of wood or plastic...
          > > 11) Epoxy and glass the deck (3 layers)
          > > 12) Cut off the unnecessary glass...
          > > 16) Take some time to neatly cut of all unnecessary glass and
          epoxy
          > > 17) Glass the bottom (2 layers) using epoxy...
          > > 19) Finish it by sanding the bottom where needed
          >
          > These steps are not needed for a wood board, which is part of what
          > makes it so appealing. What makes wood appealing to me is that the
          > shape can be experimentally altered after completion, by simply
          > cutting/sanding some wood off & repainting.
          >
          > The foam core board will have a better strength-to-weight ratio
          > though, but it might be hard to figure exactly the weight of cloth
          to
          > use, since less needed if the fiber or resin is stronger (carbon vs
          > glass, epoxy vs polyester).
          >
          > Mel
        • tswierkocki@yahoo.com
          Is floor isolation foam a common item in home improvement stores like the Home Depot? I d like to give it a try. ... board ... rocker ... line
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 3, 2001
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            Is floor isolation foam a common item in home improvement stores like
            the Home Depot? I'd like to give it a try.



            --- In kitesurf@y..., emet.cormon@v... wrote:
            > Making boards out of wood/multiplex have several drawbacks:
            > .Lack of volume
            > .Fixing scoop-rockerline
            > .Rails or bevels in the bottom are not possible
            >
            > The use of floor isolation foam has several advantages:
            > .thickness to choose from inventory
            > .bending the foamboard into the scoop-rockerline and fixing it with
            > epoxy and glass fiber
            > .floor isolation is made off closed cell foam, which doesn't suck
            > water at all
            >
            > 1) Buy a floor isolation foam - thickness to choose yourself
            > 2) The length is a problem, as most popular available lengths are
            > shorter than the average board
            > But it is possible to glue to the back and the front a foot length
            > of foam in order to get the needed length
            > 3) Cut out the outline of the board
            > 4) Mill out the wanted rails or bevels in the bottom while the
            board
            > is still flat! Much easier !
            > 5) Shape the deck
            > 6) Plug in:glue in the inserts needed for footstraps, leachline and
            > fins: in most cases some piece of wood or plastic
            > 7) Take a good board: copy the scoop-rocker line to two strips of
            > wood in order to have 2 identical profiles
            > 8) Make a hole in the middle of the board and insert a wire with a
            > knot.
            > 9) Put the board onto the 2 strips of wood
            > 10) Pull the wire downward so the board gets the desired scoop-
            rocker
            > line and fix the wire so the board stays in place and shape.
            > 11) Epoxy and glass the deck (3 layers)
            > 12) Cut off the unnecessary glass
            > 13) Let it harden out for a night
            > 14) Cut of the wire, theb oard has now accepted the scoop-rocker
            line
            > 15) Turn the board around
            > 16) Take some time to neatly cut of all unnecessary glass and epoxy
            > 17) Glass the bottom (2 layers) using epoxy
            > 18) Let it harden out in a warm place
            > 19) Finish it by sanding the bottom where needed
            > 20) Mount footstraps, leach, fins
            >
            > Advantages:
            > .Using a known scoop-rockerline with no shaping needed
            > .Volume
            > .Painting is not needed as the foam doesn't suck water
            > .Complete flat bottom
            > .Rails can be milled out when the board is still flat
            > .Relatively fast construction
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