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Re: [ksurf] Re: Risky Business / "blind" Online shopping carts

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  • kitesrfer@aol.com
    You make some good points. I like your idea of handing out kitesurfing guidelines with equipment purchases, makes good sense. A couple of years ago when the
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 1, 2001
      You make some good points. I like your idea of handing out kitesurfing
      guidelines with equipment purchases, makes good sense. A couple of years ago
      when the number of kitesurfers was lower, I would have also said why bother
      the retailers with asking potential customers a bunch of questions.
      Unfortunately, bans are on the rise, due to both experienced and
      inexperienced kitesurfers. Here in Florida and I suspect in lots of other
      places, officials are taking a wait and see attitude over whether to continue
      to allow kitesurfing. You are right, newbies are not the sole cause of the
      problem, careless experienced kitesurfers, plain old unlucky kitesurfers and
      too many kitesurfers in one place also contribute to the problem or percieved
      problem. We have to start somewhere though, with kitesurfing associations and
      hopefully with retailers.

      I think everyone will agree that this sport can be dangerous. For a new, not
      very well informed kitesurfer with a large kite in moderate to strong winds,
      he could easily damage the kite, injure himself, create an incident with
      bystanders and even contribute to a ban or harsh kitesurfing restrictions.
      Some say manditory training will eventually be required for kitesurfers, at
      least in parts of the USA. If we promote good common sense practices, like
      basic instruction for new kitesurfers, we may avoid that from ever coming
      about. A lot of responsibility falls on the retailers as a consequence,
      because they largely control access to the sport by controlling access to the
      gear (iwindsurf and other used gear sites aside). So the retailers can try
      to channel new kitesurfers into instruction out of a sense of kitesurfing
      access and market preservation or sell like crazy until the bans mount up and
      business wains. Such precautions make good sense to me but I don't sell
      kitesurfing gear.

      Sell safe,
      Rick

      << -- In kitesurf@y..., jeff@k... wrote:
      > About a week ago, I posted my concerns about people "beginners"
      > purchasing kites online with "blind" shopping carts.

      > without screening the customer. The result is a rookie with a new
      > traction kite showing up at the beach and flying the kite "without"
      > proper instruction. Lessons cannot "guarantee" safety, but do make
      a
      > HUGE difference in keeping accidents and dreaded kiteboarding bans
      to
      > a minimun.
      > -Jeff
      > Kitemare.com


      Certainly a good idea to encourage lessons and safety but I wouldnt
      condemn anyone for selling kites without investigating the purchasor.
      Are the newbies causing the accidents and the bans out there? All I
      hear on the web and in the magazines is accidents with pretty
      advanced riders.I would imagine bans are more related to crowding and
      not complaints on new kiters.
      I've never been a big fan of rules to protect people from
      themselves. I think retailors that dont inquire into someones
      experience level and arrange lessons can provide a simple written
      cautionary directions explaining potential dangers of lofting,
      dragging etc and instruct on the size of clear area needed and wind
      for safe practice. M. Elliott


      Support your local kitesurf association !
      >>
    • Kitepower
      Most of the problem children in our area bought their kites secondhand?! Many people selling kitesurfing gear are fairly inexperienced themselves, and then
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 1, 2001
        Most of the "problem children" in our area bought their kites secondhand?!
        Many people selling kitesurfing gear are fairly inexperienced themselves,
        and then there are the ones who just don't care what happens to their used
        kite.
        You can't stop people from selling gear without lessons, but everyone can,
        as we do at kite beach on Botany Bay, help everyone you see.
        A second summer veteran asked me for help in getting his AB 8.4 to fly
        yesterday, and I said whats wrong, you were using it the evening before. He
        said he had re-rigged it 5 times, anyway I found one of his flying lines
        connected wrongly went to launch and this kite just would not fly.
        Eventually we found that he had rigged his safety system incorrectly, I
        think he took it as an indicator that he was dog tired after 4 days of
        Nor'easters, as he did not stay out long after that.
        Be wary of the effects of fatigue and dehydration, they can affect your
        ability to think quickly and clearly.
        Spread the word about safety, lessons and your local kiteboarding/surfing
        association.

        Cya and
        Goodwinds
        Steve McCormack
        http://www.kitepower.com.au
        mailto:sydney@...
        126 Beach St, Coogee, NSW, Australia 2034
        Open 7 Days 9.30 - 5.30
        Also at 386 Latrobe Terrace Geelong Vic
        mailto:geelong@...

        -----Original Message-----
        From: kitesrfer@... [mailto:kitesrfer@...]
        Sent: Tuesday, 2 October 2001 1:16
        To: kitesurf@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [ksurf] Re: Risky Business / "blind" Online shopping carts


        You make some good points. I like your idea of handing out kitesurfing
        guidelines with equipment purchases, makes good sense. A couple of years ago
        when the number of kitesurfers was lower, I would have also said why bother
        the retailers with asking potential customers a bunch of questions.
        Unfortunately, bans are on the rise, due to both experienced and
        inexperienced kitesurfers. Here in Florida and I suspect in lots of other
        places, officials are taking a wait and see attitude over whether to
        continue
        to allow kitesurfing. You are right, newbies are not the sole cause of the
        problem, careless experienced kitesurfers, plain old unlucky kitesurfers
        and
        too many kitesurfers in one place also contribute to the problem or
        percieved
        problem. We have to start somewhere though, with kitesurfing associations
        and
        hopefully with retailers.

        I think everyone will agree that this sport can be dangerous. For a new,
        not
        very well informed kitesurfer with a large kite in moderate to strong winds,
        he could easily damage the kite, injure himself, create an incident with
        bystanders and even contribute to a ban or harsh kitesurfing restrictions.
        Some say manditory training will eventually be required for kitesurfers, at
        least in parts of the USA. If we promote good common sense practices, like
        basic instruction for new kitesurfers, we may avoid that from ever coming
        about. A lot of responsibility falls on the retailers as a consequence,
        because they largely control access to the sport by controlling access to
        the
        gear (iwindsurf and other used gear sites aside). So the retailers can try
        to channel new kitesurfers into instruction out of a sense of kitesurfing
        access and market preservation or sell like crazy until the bans mount up
        and
        business wains. Such precautions make good sense to me but I don't sell
        kitesurfing gear.

        Sell safe,
        Rick

        << -- In kitesurf@y..., jeff@k... wrote:
        > About a week ago, I posted my concerns about people "beginners"
        > purchasing kites online with "blind" shopping carts.

        > without screening the customer. The result is a rookie with a new
        > traction kite showing up at the beach and flying the kite "without"
        > proper instruction. Lessons cannot "guarantee" safety, but do make
        a
        > HUGE difference in keeping accidents and dreaded kiteboarding bans
        to
        > a minimun.
        > -Jeff
        > Kitemare.com


        Certainly a good idea to encourage lessons and safety but I wouldnt
        condemn anyone for selling kites without investigating the purchasor.
        Are the newbies causing the accidents and the bans out there? All I
        hear on the web and in the magazines is accidents with pretty
        advanced riders.I would imagine bans are more related to crowding and
        not complaints on new kiters.
        I've never been a big fan of rules to protect people from
        themselves. I think retailors that dont inquire into someones
        experience level and arrange lessons can provide a simple written
        cautionary directions explaining potential dangers of lofting,
        dragging etc and instruct on the size of clear area needed and wind
        for safe practice. M. Elliott


        Support your local kitesurf association !
        >>

        Support your local kitesurf association !


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