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Re: [ksurf] NSI Product Caution

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  • kitesrfer@aol.com
    I spoke with NSI about my recent leash failure. They checked with their designer who stated that the plastic swivel should stay intact until hit with a load
    Message 1 of 3 , May 2, 2001
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      I spoke with NSI about my recent leash failure. They checked with their
      designer who stated that the plastic swivel should stay intact until hit with
      a load which will result in a broken bone or other serious injury if the
      swivel doesn't release the kite. This is a good intent and I remember Naish
      struggling with similar issues last year with their first leash cuff which
      was eventually replaced with something more secure. In my instance, would
      serious injury have resulted if the swivel stayed intact, it is hard to say
      but I don't think so. I am used to getting beat on pretty hard by this sport
      on occasion as I am sure are many others but who knows. So NSI and other
      manufactures have to face the question, should my product provide load relief
      at a certain point to preempt serious injury, although that load point may be
      reached earlier than anticipated or should the product stay intact come hell
      or high water and damn the resulting injuries, if any. It is a tough
      question, especially for a US corporation in the Land of Torts. If such a
      design trait is to be employed I would think some written warning with the
      product would be a good idea, that the product will release under certain
      foreseeable loading conditions.

      Good winds,
      Rick

      << I had my NSI kite leash pull apart today sending my AR5 7.5 m kite and bar
      flying off in 25 mph winds towards a crowded, low four lane bridge.
      Fortunately, the kite ended up hitting the shore short of the bridge,
      tangling in some bushes and staying put until I could catchup with it.>>
    • mark.elliott@expresspersonnel.com
      ... their ... until hit with ... if the ... IMO I had two similiar plastic swivels that came with my original version long horn bars (or maybe the same as
      Message 2 of 3 , May 2, 2001
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        --- In kitesurf@y..., kitesrfer@a... wrote:
        > I spoke with NSI about my recent leash failure. They checked with
        their
        > designer who stated that the plastic swivel should stay intact
        until hit with
        > a load which will result in a broken bone or other serious injury
        if the
        > swivel doesn't release the kite.
        IMO
        I had two similiar plastic swivels that came with my original
        version long horn bars (or maybe the same as NSI). One that snaped
        the first time I let go of a fully powered kite and the other one on
        the 2nd or third release.
        Had Rick experienced forces strong enough to snap a bone im sure he
        would of mentioned his 30 ft vertical lift or drag. If they were the
        same or similiar to what came with the longhorn they were totally
        inadequate plastic.They could not handle forces even approaching bone
        breaks.You could probably be yanked into the air 50 ft by a wrist
        leash and not break a bone. Sounds like NSI sales talk. I could snap
        by hand, maybe only a 1/4 thick. I bet like naish did, both NSI and
        Longhorn screwed up and should have replaced with something that
        actually performs the use it was intended for. Probably would have
        saved Rick and others as a customer.
        MARK





        This is a good intent and I remember Naish
        > struggling with similar issues last year with their first leash
        cuff which
        > was eventually replaced with something more secure. In my instance,
        would
        > serious injury have resulted if the swivel stayed intact, it is
        hard to say
        > but I don't think so. I am used to getting beat on pretty hard by
        this sport
        > on occasion as I am sure are many others but who knows. So NSI and
        other
        > manufactures have to face the question, should my product provide
        load relief
        > at a certain point to preempt serious injury, although that load
        point may be
        > reached earlier than anticipated or should the product stay intact
        come hell
        > or high water and damn the resulting injuries, if any. It is a
        tough
        > question, especially for a US corporation in the Land of Torts. If
        such a
        > design trait is to be employed I would think some written warning
        with the
        > product would be a good idea, that the product will release under
        certain
        > foreseeable loading conditions.
        >
        > Good winds,
        > Rick
        >
        > << I had my NSI kite leash pull apart today sending my AR5 7.5 m
        kite and bar
        > flying off in 25 mph winds towards a crowded, low four lane
        bridge.
        > Fortunately, the kite ended up hitting the shore short of the
        bridge,
        > tangling in some bushes and staying put until I could catchup with
        it.>>
      • Mel
        ... with ... That wouldn t be an issue if the leash is attached to your harness instead of your wrist. I m trying to think of an advantage of using a wrist
        Message 3 of 3 , May 2, 2001
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          <kitesrfer@...> wrote:

          > I spoke with NSI about my recent leash failure. They checked with their
          > designer who stated that the plastic swivel should stay intact until hit
          with
          > a load which will result in a broken bone or other serious injury ...

          That wouldn't be an issue if the leash is attached to your harness instead
          of your wrist. I'm trying to think of an advantage of using a wrist leash
          instead of a harness leash, but can't think of any right now. If there
          really aren't any, we could all just attach our leashed to our harnesses, &
          then the leashes can be made strong.

          Mel
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