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[ksurf] Measured speeds?

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  • Mark Frasier
    Hi folks, Has anyone taken a GPS with them on the water to measure speed? what s the average speed you ride at? Max speed? We used a GPS this winter on the
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 1, 2000
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      Hi folks,

      Has anyone taken a GPS with them on the water to measure speed? what's the
      average speed you ride at? Max speed?

      We used a GPS this winter on the frozen lakes when we were kiteskiing.
      Pretty cool - you get your max speed, distance traveled, and you can also
      check out your upwind & downwind angles.

      Just curious,
      Mark Frasier
    • ben merkenhof
      Mark, In 1999 we did a Jetty to Jetty Speed trial at the Inaugral Kite surf Challenge in Adelaide. The course was 1.8km in length, not quite your 500m speed
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 5, 2000
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        Mark,

        In 1999 we did a Jetty to Jetty Speed trial at the Inaugral Kite surf
        Challenge in Adelaide. The course was 1.8km in length, not quite your
        500m speed trial course. The average speed over this distance was
        just over 30kph. Considering I had two stacks in the run and I was
        flying a 8.5 Wipika I would imagine some of the speeds would have
        been around 45kph. But the average is all we can go off at the moment
        and that is about 30kph.

        Ben Merkenhof
        kiteboard.com.au

        --- In kitesurf@egroups.com, Mark Frasier <brockus@e...> wrote:
        > Hi folks,
        >
        > Has anyone taken a GPS with them on the water to measure speed?
        what's the
        > average speed you ride at? Max speed?
        >
        > We used a GPS this winter on the frozen lakes when we were
        kiteskiing.
        > Pretty cool - you get your max speed, distance traveled, and you
        can also
        > check out your upwind & downwind angles.
        >
        > Just curious,
        > Mark Frasier
      • David Trewern
        I have seen a photo of Manu Bertin shot from a helicopter directly above, and apparently the helicopter was doing 38knots, and matching the speed of the rider.
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 5, 2000
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          I have seen a photo of Manu Bertin shot from a helicopter directly above,
          and apparently the helicopter was doing 38knots, and matching the speed of
          the rider.

          I have done heaps of windsurfing on a speed course (Sandy Point) where the
          world speed sailing record of about 42knots was officially set a few years
          ago by a guy called Mal Wright. They have a speed sailing event there every
          year in October - It might be fun to go down there with a kite this year.

          They have regular 40knot + winds blowing directly onshore over a long low
          sand spit. This means that in the inlet, you have insane wind and glassy
          water close to the shore. The spit gradually bears away downwind over about
          3 or 4 kms. Only thing is getting back up wind to the beach if you get
          carried away and go too far downwind.

          In general - I think Sailboards cruise at a faster speed - but I think if
          you were out in strong wind, flat water and bearing away downwind (with very
          big balls) there would be the potential to go faster.

          DT
        • Dave Culp
          ... Um... Helicopters measure their speed through the air, not over the ground... Surely they did not measure the board s speed in no wind. ... I don t know
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 5, 2000
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            >I have seen a photo of Manu Bertin shot from a helicopter directly above,
            >and apparently the helicopter was doing 38knots, and matching the speed of
            >the rider.

            Um... Helicopters measure their speed through the air, not over the
            ground... Surely they did not measure the board's speed in no wind.

            >
            >I have done heaps of windsurfing on a speed course (Sandy Point) where the
            >world speed sailing record of about 42knots was officially set a few years
            >ago by a guy called Mal Wright. They have a speed sailing event there every
            >year in October - It might be fun to go down there with a kite this year.

            I don't know Mal, but presume you're not talking about YP Endeavour's
            record (Lindsay Cunningham) of 46.52 knots, average over 500 meters.
            Boat, not kiteboard.

            Cory Roeseler was timed at 26 knots, average over 500 meters, way
            back in 1988. He's finished the Gorge Blowout; 20 statute miles dead
            to leeward (so nearer 30-35 miles, counting for jibes--and bucking
            the 4-5 knot current) in less than an hour. Cory was radared in the
            Gorge at something just over 45 kts briefly (not mph, not kph, but
            nautical miles per hour), so we know very high speeds are possible.

            Dave Culp
          • greg.walsh@dhs.vic.gov.au
            I believe for a while the sail speed record was held by a fairly standard slalom sailboard. This was at the end of the overgrown waterski speed sailboard era.
            Message 5 of 7 , Apr 5, 2000
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              I believe for a while the sail speed record was held by a fairly standard
              slalom sailboard. This was at the end of the overgrown waterski speed
              sailboard era. If I remember correctly there was much fuss about pushing
              the 50mph barrier. Shortly after that the Yellow Pages cat. pushed the
              record up a pretty large notch and speed sailboarding seemed to disappear
              from the spotlight.

              Greg





              snip

              I don't know Mal, but presume you're not talking about YP Endeavour's
              record (Lindsay Cunningham) of 46.52 knots, average over 500 meters.
              Boat, not kiteboard.


              chop
            • KiteBoard@aol.com
              In a message dated 00-04-05 19:40:01 EDT, david@dtdesign.com.au writes:
              Message 6 of 7 , Apr 5, 2000
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                In a message dated 00-04-05 19:40:01 EDT, david@... writes:

                << In general - I think Sailboards cruise at a faster speed - but I think if
                you were out in strong wind, flat water and bearing away downwind (with very
                big balls) there would be the potential to go faster. >>

                I agree. There are some pretty fast boardsailors here (I used to be one of
                them), & I can now almost keep up reaching (with the guys I used to barely
                pass) when we're equally powered up & I'm really trying hard. I think they
                have an even greater speed advantage upwind, but feel that broad reaching I
                may actually be faster than I used to be on a sailboard, especially in light
                to moderate winds. Considering I windsurfed for over 20 years (& the gear
                has been constantly getting better over that time) but I've only been
                kiteboarding for about 8 months (& the gear is less refined?) performance
                should only get better.

                Mel
              • derekbown@yahoo.com
                ... where the ... few years ... Where is this site located? I m very interested in checking it out. Thanks.
                Message 7 of 7 , Dec 1, 2000
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                  --- In kitesurf@egroups.com, David Trewern <david@d...> wrote:

                  ....
                  > I have done heaps of windsurfing on a speed course (Sandy Point)
                  where the
                  > world speed sailing record of about 42knots was officially set a
                  few years
                  > ago by a guy called Mal Wright.

                  Where is this site located? I'm very interested in checking it out.

                  Thanks.
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