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70532RE: [ksurf] 2 non FAQ Beginner questions

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  • Klotz, Michael MD
    Jul 19, 2007
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      This isn't surfing. Not knowing how to handle a kite can EASILY get you killed, or make you a quad. More importantly, and despite you free spirit, you could also kill or seriously injure a bystander. We have all seen experienced kites get into major trouble and that is on the water. We have also seen/heard of multiple deaths and head injuries from ending up on land. Typically from beginners who don't understand the potential power of a kite. I strongly recommend flying a trainer kite until you can fly it blind and then take lessons. Depending on the wind, your larger kite could have the power of a MasterCraft and when you lose control, and you will, it is as if someone hit the throttle. This is advice from kiteboarding fanatics. Be safe or you may not live to enjoy this awesome sport. MK

      -----Original Message-----
      From: kitesurf@yahoogroups.com [mailto:kitesurf@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Andy
      Sent: Thursday, July 19, 2007 12:17 PM
      To: kitesurf@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [ksurf] 2 non FAQ Beginner questions

      Well, I'm hopefully meeting up with 2 other guys who've just done the
      same this weekend so we'll see what happens to all 3 of us.

      I remember this stuff when I started surfing. `Always bring company`
      `Get insurance` blah blah. The advice is good and took it onboard. But
      what I loved was just driving off alone somewhere, knowing that my
      life is my responsibility. Like a freeclimbing rock climber I love
      that responsibility of one's own skin. I love knowing that if I slip,
      it's my fault and mine alone. And when I nearly drowned I loved it. I
      loved the thrill of being alive after something like that. I like
      advice, nobody likes orders. Nanny culture, I own these bones. But if
      I expect you to help me afterwards, now that's a different argument,
      and one I heed.

      Now, I got this 9 and I've decided to heed advice about harnesses so
      as a result I don't want to wear a harness for safety's sake. But the
      only way I can see how to rig the kite is with the depower lines that
      connect to a harness.

      So, you can either let me figure it out myself or you can give me a
      hint as to whether this kite is dependent on a harness.

      Don't get me wrong, I believe there are very significant dangers. But
      I don't believe that that therefore means I have to pay significant
      money to a professional who extols on and on about those dangers in
      order to boost business. There are cheaper forms of education, and
      other ways of increasing safety. What of people we've known in the
      past who had no lessons and are here to tell the tale?

      I didn't expect to win this kite. So when it came though I thought,
      another kite for training? I thought, if I get a non gusty day and the
      wind is light, being a 9 that should treat me a little more lightly so
      let's just get on with it. Let's just get on with it or it'll never

      Managed to get it up briefly last night with a friend holding the
      harness attachment. Didn't seem too bad. And if it did take me, just
      drop the bar. I'm no expert but is that really so hard?

      Anyway, you'll all hate me know so nice knowing you.

      - A

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