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Re: [Kierkegaardian] Re: Faith

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  • ana cielo
    im just curious. are u people theologians or something of that sort? roncriss wrote:Interesting comments all! This reminds me of the
    Message 1 of 12 , Nov 1, 2002
      im just curious. are u people theologians or something of that sort?
      roncriss <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:Interesting comments all! This reminds me of the modern emphasis on
      praxis (practice), as opposed to mere theory in liberation and other
      social theologies. As Jesus Himself said:

      "He that hath my commandments, and keepeth them, he it is that loveth
      me: and he that loveth me shall be loved of my Father, and I will
      love him, and will manifest myself to him" (John 14:21).

      Notice He does not say we are saved by faith alone! "Faith without
      works is dead".

      ~Ron~


      --- In kierkegaardians@y..., ana cielo <annacoelum@y...> wrote:
      >
      > that is so true. kierkegaard actually criticized preachers like
      bishop Mynster who does not live what he preaches. for kierkegaard
      also it is not enough that something is in ur mind, rather it should
      be live up to. and this is the same when it comes to faith. this is
      what he's concept of reduplication is about. living what u believe in.
      > Steven <sb_97302@y...> wrote: --- In kierkegaardians@y...,
      roncriss <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      > > S�ren Kierkegaard and the Supremacy of Faith
      > > by Tim Garrett
      > >
      > I think also that SK, more than most, also saw Christianity not so
      > much as kneeling down and worshipping the pointing finger of Christ
      > but actually to see and go to the Way He points ...
      >
      >
      >
      >



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    • Ron Criss
      But isn t there, even when witnesses are involved, a certain amount of trust implied in faith? Isn t there an intuitive element to faith distinct from
      Message 2 of 12 , Jan 8, 2006
        But isn't there, even when witnesses are involved, a certain amount
        of trust implied in faith? Isn't there an intuitive element to faith
        distinct from knowledge per se?

        (Btw, I changed the heading to reflect the subject)

        Ron


        --- In kierkegaardians@yahoogroups.com, "<none>" <jamesrovira@y...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Don -- don't you think it's possible for "trust" and "knowledge"
        to be related, though? For example, a child might trust his father
        to be honest with him as the father describes his day to his child.
        The child believes his father as a result, and because he believes
        his father, the child believes he has acquired knowledge about his
        father's work world -- "real" knowledge, "truth."
        >
        > Jim R.
        >
        > Don Anderson <don@n...> wrote: me: Ron, my point is that so
        called revealed knowledge is not knowledge,
        > certainly not in the sense that objective knowledge is defined to
        be. All
        > objective knowledge (alathea) does come through the senses. Faith
        and belief
        > are not an organ of knowledge but an organ of trust and will.
        >
        > Don
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
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