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Re: Sientio's Mandate

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  • jimstuart46
    Don, Thank you for your thoughtful post. I think we are fairly close in our thoughts on the issues you address. Let me just comment on this section of your
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 20, 2009
      Don,

      Thank you for your thoughtful post. I think we are fairly close in our thoughts on the issues you address.

      Let me just comment on this section of your post:

      "I still see Silentio as a Hegelian, no doubt moving towards the Socratic, thinking in that direction but not yet making the move. But I don't want to prematurely close the door on the possibility that he had. If you could show me where it is clear that Silentio has made the movement to "infinite resignation" I could then fully buy into your argument? But I don't see that that would change much of my argument about where Silentio stands. All he tells us is that he can't make the movement to faith in either case."

      I have not got a quote to hand to answer your question as to whether Silentio has made the movement of infinite resignation or not. If I find one to settle the matter, I shall let you know.

      What I do recall from my readings of F&T is that Silentio writes that he can understand the knights of infinite resignation (for example, the tragic heroes), but he cannot understand the knights of faith (such as Abraham).

      Now, assuming Silentio is being honest, and assuming Kierkegaard's view that an individual can only understand what he or she has been through, then the evidence is that Silentio has made the movement of infinite resignation.

      However, as you say, this issue is probably a fairly minor one compared to the central themes of F&T.

      Jim S
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