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Either/Or Translations

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  • xipetotec6@cox.net
    Sorry to ask a stupid translation question(s), but these online translators just don t seem to get it right. What is the correct translation for these 2
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 27, 2009
      Sorry to ask a stupid translation question(s), but these online translators just don't seem to get it right. What is the correct translation for these 2 phrases from the beginning of "Either/Or". I know the 1st is latin, and think the 2nd is French (although some of the 2nd looks like latin)

      1) ad se ipsum

      2) Grandeur,savoir,renomme, Amitie, plaisir et bien, Tout n'est que vent, que fumee: Pour mieux dire, tout n'est rien.

      Also, can anyone elaborate on their inclusion . Are we to understand that they are from "A"'s hand, or is the latin from Victor Emerita.
    • James Rovira
      If no one else replies, I may be able to give you an answer in a couple hours. Do you have the Hong translations? Jim ... -- James Rovira Tiffin University
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 27, 2009
        If no one else replies, I may be able to give you an answer in a couple hours.  Do you have the Hong translations?

        Jim

        On Tue, Jan 27, 2009 at 4:20 AM, <xipetotec6@...> wrote:

        Sorry to ask a stupid translation question(s), but these online translators just don't seem to get it right. What is the correct translation for these 2 phrases from the beginning of "Either/Or". I know the 1st is latin, and think the 2nd is French (although some of the 2nd looks like latin)

        1) ad se ipsum

        2) Grandeur,savoir,renomme, Amitie, plaisir et bien, Tout n'est que vent, que fumee: Pour mieux dire, tout n'est rien.

        Also, can anyone elaborate on their inclusion . Are we to understand that they are from "A"'s hand, or is the latin from Victor Emerita.




        --
        James Rovira
        Tiffin University
        龍火士心
      • James Rovira
        The first, ad se ipsum, is translated by the Hongs, To himself. Follow the footnotes and you re told that The motto is printed on the cover of Journal EE
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 27, 2009
          The first,"ad se ipsum," is translated by the Hongs, "To himself."  Follow the footnotes and you're told that "The motto is printed on the cover of Journal EE (Pap. II A 341-576, Feb. 1-Sept. 23, 1839).  Interesting point of contact with these fictional journals and K's personal journals.

          The second is translated by the Hongs,

          "Greatness, knowledge, renown,
          Friendship, pleasure and possessions,
          All is only wind, only smoke:
          To say it better, all is nothing." 

          The footnote tells us it's by Paul Pelisson (1624-1693), possibly found by Kierkegaard in Lessing's Zerstrute Anmerkungen uber das Epigramm. 

          Hope this helps.  I got this information from the Hong's translation for Princeton UP, E/O part 1.

          Jim R

        • James Rovira
          PS Since the papers were supposed to be found scattered and disorganized in a desk drawer by Victor Eremita, I would assume there was no cover page for these
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 27, 2009
            PS Since the papers were supposed to be found scattered and disorganized in a desk drawer by Victor Eremita, I would assume there was no cover page for these papers, and these inscriptions were added by Eremita himself.

            Jim R

            On Tue, Jan 27, 2009 at 10:34 AM, James Rovira <jamesrovira@...> wrote:
            The first,"ad se ipsum," is translated by the Hongs, "To himself."  Follow the footnotes and you're told that "The motto is printed on the cover of Journal EE (Pap. II A 341-576, Feb. 1-Sept. 23, 1839).  Interesting point of contact with these fictional journals and K's personal journals.

            The second is translated by the Hongs,

            "Greatness, knowledge, renown,
            Friendship, pleasure and possessions,
            All is only wind, only smoke:
            To say it better, all is nothing." 

            The footnote tells us it's by Paul Pelisson (1624-1693), possibly found by Kierkegaard in Lessing's Zerstrute Anmerkungen uber das Epigramm. 

            Hope this helps.  I got this information from the Hong's translation for Princeton UP, E/O part 1.

            Jim R


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