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Thoughts On Kierkegaard's Journal: And Mine

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  • Ron Price
    IDEE FIXE In his introduction to The Journals of Kierkegaard(1834-1854) Alexander Dru writes that at the age of 33, from 1846 on, the whole significance of
    Message 1 of 16 , Jul 4 7:55 AM
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      IDEE FIXE

      In his introduction to The Journals of Kierkegaard(1834-1854)
      Alexander Dru writes that at the age of 33, from 1846 on, the whole
      significance of what Kierkegaard had written "suddenly dawned on
      him." "His gifts and talents," Dru went on, were to be his vocation.
      He had understood his mission." It was a mission implicit in the work
      he had written. In 1846 he began a series of what he called
      his "proper" Note-books a continuation of his previously haphazard
      ones. Dru says that the reader can see Kierkegaard's extraordinary
      destiny taking shape in these Notebooks, a destiny in the service of
      an idea, an idee fixe, a destiny linked to an "idea for which he
      could live and die."-Ron Price with thanks to Alexander
      Dru, "Introduction to The Journals of Kierkegaard," Fontana, 4th
      impression 1967, (Oxford UP, 1938), pp.7-10.

      Your posterity your confidant
      by means of your journal,
      your most trusted confidant:
      "The thing is to find a truth
      which is true for me, to find
      the idea for which I can live
      and for which I can die......1

      My posterity my confidant
      as I leave behind all these
      words--after I found a truth
      which was true for me and
      for which I have lived, found
      a mission, a destiny, a service
      to an idea, an idee fixe whose
      time had come in this dark
      heart of an age of transition
      and gradually unfolded by
      stages to array my life with
      the fruits of consecrated joy.

      1 This was written in Kierkegaard's Journal on August 1, 1835. The
      entire collection of his Danish journals has been edited and
      published in 13 volumes which consist of 25 separate bindings
      including indices. The first English edition of his Journals was
      edited by Alexander Dru in 1938. A third official translation will
      contain 55 volumes and is expected to be completed by 2009.

      2 "Were I to die now the effect of my life would be exceptional,"
      Kierkegaard wrote, "much of what I have simply jotted down carelessly
      in the Journals would become of great importance and have a great
      effect." --Journals, December 1849.

      Ron Price
      4 July 2007
    • KTP
      I have often thought that Kierkegaard was manic. Idee Fixe means just that in Greek. The question I have is : why did he have this fixed idea, this mania?
      Message 2 of 16 , Jul 4 3:52 PM
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        I have often thought that Kierkegaard was manic. 'Idee Fixe' means just that in Greek. The question I have is : why did he have this fixed idea, this mania?

        Nickle

      • Will Brown
        Yo, nicklekula, I think he found it on a Jutland heath. ~~will~~ ... just ... idea,
        Message 3 of 16 , Jul 5 1:53 PM
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          Yo, nicklekula, I think he found it on a Jutland heath.  ~~will~~

          --- In kierkegaardians@yahoogroups.com, "KTP" <nnn88388@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > I have often thought that Kierkegaard was manic. 'Idee Fixe' means just
          > that in Greek. The question I have is : why did he have this fixed idea,
          > this mania?
          >
          > Nickle
          >
        • James Rovira
          Ha...his father found it on a Jutland heath. He passed it on to his son. Joakim Garff s biography from a couple years ago says that Kierkegaard suffered from
          Message 4 of 16 , Jul 5 2:07 PM
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            Ha...his father found it on a Jutland heath.  He passed it on to his son. 

            Joakim Garff's biography from a couple years ago says that Kierkegaard suffered from a neurological disorder that did indeed produce a mania -- graphomania -- which is a symptom of a form of epilepsy K may have had. 

            Jim R

            On 7/5/07, Will Brown <wilbro99@...> wrote:

            Yo, nicklekula, I think he found it on a Jutland heath.  ~~will~~

          • KTP
            ... son. ... -- ... had. ... Jim, What SK s father found on the Jutland heath was a curse for a curse and passed it on to little Ludvig in his upbringing. What
            Message 5 of 16 , Jul 5 4:11 PM
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              --- In kierkegaardians@yahoogroups.com, "James Rovira" <jamesrovira@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Ha...his father found it on a Jutland heath. He passed it on to his
              son.
              >
              > Joakim Garff's biography from a couple years ago says that Kierkegaard
              > suffered from a neurological disorder that did indeed produce a mania
              --
              > graphomania -- which is a symptom of a form of epilepsy K may have
              had.
              >
              > Jim R
              >


              Jim,

              What SK's father found on the Jutland heath was a curse for a curse and
              passed it on to little Ludvig in his upbringing. What SK may have found
              on that same Jutland heath was a blessing that blotted out the curse. I
              would guess SK tried to communicate this to his father before he died.
              Maybe he did or maybe he discovered that one cannot communicate such
              things directly.

              Indeed SK may have suffered from epilepsy, although he is careful not to
              say so. I think his choice of the pseudonyms 'Climacus' and
              'Anti-Climacus' may be cryptive names for the epileptic episode prior to
              and after the 'brain storm'. Perhaps it's the lightning during the brain
              storm that provides the insight and the mania to communicate it. Maybe
              that's why he is so sympathetic to Socrates and St. Paul among others.

              Nick O
            • James Rovira
              I don t think SK ever made it to the Jutland heath, though, Nick. I got the impression he was a Copenhagener pretty well all his life except for three years
              Message 6 of 16 , Jul 5 5:15 PM
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                I don't think SK ever made it to the Jutland heath, though, Nick.  I got the impression he was a Copenhagener pretty well all his life except for three years or so in Germany. 

                But, he did have his excursions.

                I agree with you about the curse, though.  Seems like SK had an experience at the very end of his life in which he deeply felt God's forgiveness.  I don't know that his father ever did.

                Jim R
              • KTP
                ... got the ... three ... experience ... I ... Hi Jim, I think SK did visit the Jutland heath. Here is something I found on the web and I m sure I ve read
                Message 7 of 16 , Jul 5 5:56 PM
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                  --- In kierkegaardians@yahoogroups.com, "James Rovira" <jamesrovira@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I don't think SK ever made it to the Jutland heath, though, Nick. I got the
                  > impression he was a Copenhagener pretty well all his life except for three
                  > years or so in Germany.
                  >
                  > But, he did have his excursions.
                  >
                  > I agree with you about the curse, though. Seems like SK had an experience
                  > at the very end of his life in which he deeply felt God's forgiveness. I
                  > don't know that his father ever did.
                  >
                  > Jim R
                  >

                  Hi Jim, I think SK did visit the Jutland heath. Here is something I found on the web and I'm sure I've read before in the journals or real books on SK.

                  Nick

                  http://www.stolaf.edu/collections/kierkegaard/newsletter/issue45/45002.htm

                   

                  "Meanwhile, SAKs wanderlust was not limited by the city limits (as it was in Berlin , where a shortage of public conveniences restricted his moves significantly! [180 f.]). During his visit to Jutland in 1839, he wanders in solitude across the heath expecting to encounter a nature of mythological gravity consistent with the home of his father. But lo and behold, he gets so confused by the actual views that a dizzying emptiness and nothingness foils his expectations and leaves him in a state of utter anxiety (141 f.). Within a few pages the anxiety has spread to a prefiguation of the chasm between his ideal and burning desires on the one side and naked reality on the other (144). Wanderlust may not be confined by city limits, but confined it is by nature. Small wonder, then, not merely that to travel meant to write in SAK's case, but that to write meant to travel, whereas plans for real life travel were rather meticulously circumvented and eventually abandoned, if at all possible (417-18). Garff's chapter about SAK changes of address (564-67) confirms in a humorous way how these settlements concern a basically unsettled person.

                   

                  The American critic Rebecca Solnit, whose book Wanderlust: A History of Walking appeared the same year as SAK and therefore was unavailable to the author of the later, has a brief chapter on Kierkegaard in which she concludingly writes about him and his likes: "They were in the world but not of it.  A solitary walker, however short his or her route, is unsettled, between places, drawn forth into action by desire and lack, having the detachment of the traveler rather than the ties of the worker, the dweller, the member of the group."2 What is striking in this and similar passages of hers is not so much the eloquence and verbal precision, although they surpass even Garff's. Rather, it is the compelling manner in which it interfaces – or intertextualizes – wandering spirits, notably Kierkegaard and Rousseau, who otherwise seem strange bedfellows separated by time and geography, ideology and personal/artistic lineaments. Biographically speaking (of wholehearted persons), these are not birds of a feather flocking together in putative real life, yet biographically speaking (as agents of textual subjectivity and subjective agents of textuality) they are clearly instances walking together – intertextually and to the thought-provoking benefit of interpretationally inclined readers.

                   

                  One more instance that is somewhat missing in this biography of SAK is Joakim Garff himself. Like his Danish colleague Jørgen Bonde Jensen in a book called Jeg er kun en Digter: Om Søren Kierkegaard som skribent (which is listed in SAK's bibliography),3 his subject is the Kierkegaard who is not "for fastholdere," as a well-known younger Danish poet has described himself.4 A bar of wet soap is not "for fastholdere," for you can literally not hold on to it. But metaforically speaking a person like Kierkegaard is not "for fastholdere" either, for he is, in Bonde Jensen's words, one who "falls outside all designations. Not only those of the literary tradition and the national identity, but also those of the clique, the common sense, and the notion of the natural."5 To come to terms with this slippery figure, Bonde Jensen acknowledges that Kierkegaards way of writing, his authorship, as it were, cannot be separated form his intentions, no more than Bonde Jensens writing can be separated from his. Hence, he "seeks in this context to take bearings of my own point of departure, the disparity between the intellectual left and Søren Kierkegaard."

                   

                  This is one way of coming to terms with slipperiness around you: Find your own position and be as steadfast as possible as you seek to engage your slippery surroundings (before you perhaps allow yourself to slide in one or more of its many directions). But it is not Joakim Garff's way. For one thing, there is little evidence in his production of any tangible affiliation with leftist causes. But more importantly, he possesses the breadth of view, erudition, and intellectual and stylistic authority to follow – without losing his critical bearings – his slippery subject in whatever direction its biographical complex may take him; at some point he even openly admits to the psychological inevitability of "biographically reading along" (248)."

                   

                   



                   

                   

                   

                   

                • James Rovira
                  Thanks much, Nick...I knew he had his excursions, but I didn t know the Jutland heath in particular made such a strong impression on him at one point. Need to
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jul 5 6:26 PM
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                    Thanks much, Nick...I knew he had his excursions, but I didn't know the Jutland heath in particular made such a strong impression on him at one point. 

                    Need to think that one through...

                    Jim R
                  • Ron Price
                    ... his son. ... Kierkegaard ... mania -- ... had. ... ~~will~~ _________________________________ A neurlogical disorder, graphomania. Interesting. I looked
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jul 5 6:53 PM
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                      --- In kierkegaardians@yahoogroups.com, "James Rovira"
                      <jamesrovira@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Ha...his father found it on a Jutland heath. He passed it on to
                      his son.
                      >
                      > Joakim Garff's biography from a couple years ago says that
                      Kierkegaard
                      > suffered from a neurological disorder that did indeed produce a
                      mania --
                      > graphomania -- which is a symptom of a form of epilepsy K may have
                      had.
                      >
                      > Jim R
                      >
                      > On 7/5/07, Will Brown <wilbro99@...> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Yo, nicklekula, I think he found it on a Jutland heath.
                      ~~will~~
                      _________________________________
                      A neurlogical disorder, graphomania. Interesting. I looked the word
                      up and found the following--osted by an Andy Oakley.com:
                      __________________
                      Graphomania is not a mania to write letters, personal diaries, or
                      family chronicles (to write for oneself or one's close relations) but
                      a mania to write books (to have a public of unknown readers). ...
                      Graphomania (a mania for writing books) inevitably takes on epidemic
                      proportions when a society devlops to the point of creating three
                      basic conditions:
                      an elevated level of general well-being, which allows people to
                      devote themselves to useless activities;
                      a high degree of social atomization and, as a consequence, a general
                      isoalation of individuals;
                      the absense of dramatic social changes in the nation's internal life.
                      (From this point of view, it seems to me symptomatic that in France,
                      where practically nothing happens, the percentage of writers is
                      twenty-one times higher than in Israel.
                      .. The mainspring that drives her to write is just that absence of
                      vital content, that void. But by a backlash, the effort affects the
                      cause. General isolation breeds graphomania, and generalized
                      graphomania in turn intensifies and worsens isolation. The invention
                      of printing formerly enabled people to understand one another. In the
                      era of universal graphomania, the writing of books has an opposite
                      meaning: everyone surrounded by his own words as by a wall of
                      mirrors, which allows no voice to filter through from outside. ...
                      One morning (and it will be soon), when everyone wakes up as a
                      writer, the age of universal deafness and incomprehension will have
                      arrived.
                      It's the final paragraph that rings true - if everyone starts
                      blogging (where the level of entry is actually far lower than the
                      case Kundera is talking about), there will simply be too much to
                      read. Although aggregation and reputation can help, I can't help but
                      wonder whether the blogging 'revolution' is going to collapse under
                      its own weight before this problem gets solved. However, they said
                      the same about the web and then there was Google; whatever happens,
                      it's going to be a big challenge.
                      posted on Sunday, June 08, 2003 8:23 PM
                      ________________________________
                      Thanks for your pointing me toward this "graphomania."-Ron Price,
                      Tasmania
                    • Will Brown
                      Nicklekula, here is the quote I was using when I answered as I did. ~~ The heath must be peculiarly suited to developing spiritual strength; here everything
                      Message 10 of 16 , Jul 5 7:19 PM
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                        Nicklekula, here is the quote I was using when I answered as I did. ~~

                        "The heath must be peculiarly suited to developing spiritual strength; here everything lies naked and unveiled before God, no place here for all those distractions, those odd nooks and crannies in which consciousness can take cover and where seriousness often has difficulty catching up with distracted thoughts. Here consciousness has to take a firm and precise grip on itself. Here on the heath one could truthfully say, 'Whither shall I flee from thy presence?'" (P&J, Hannay, p. 136) (40 III A 78)

                        --- In kierkegaardians@yahoogroups.com, "KTP" <nnn88388@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In kierkegaardians@yahoogroups.com, "James Rovira" jamesrovira@
                        > wrote:
                        > >
                        > > I don't think SK ever made it to the Jutland heath, though, Nick. I
                        > got the
                        > > impression he was a Copenhagener pretty well all his life except for
                        > three
                        > > years or so in Germany.
                        > >
                        > > But, he did have his excursions.
                        > >
                        > > I agree with you about the curse, though. Seems like SK had an
                        > experience
                        > > at the very end of his life in which he deeply felt God's forgiveness.
                        > I
                        > > don't know that his father ever did.
                        > >
                        > > Jim R
                        > >
                        >
                        >
                        > Hi Jim, I think SK did visit the Jutland heath. Here is something I
                        > found on the web and I'm sure I've read before in the journals or real
                        > books on SK.
                        >
                        > Nick
                        >
                        > http://www.stolaf.edu/collections/kierkegaard/newsletter/issue45/45002.h\
                        > tm
                        > <http://www.stolaf.edu/collections/kierkegaard/newsletter/issue45/45002.\
                        > htm>
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > "Meanwhile, SAKs wanderlust was not limited by the city limits (as it
                        > was in Berlin, where a shortage of public conveniences restricted his
                        > moves significantly! [180 f.]). During his visit to Jutland in 1839, he
                        > wanders in solitude across the heath expecting to encounter a nature of
                        > mythological gravity consistent with the home of his father. But lo and
                        > behold, he gets so confused by the actual views that a dizzying
                        > emptiness and nothingness foils his expectations and leaves him in a
                        > state of utter anxiety (141 f.). Within a few pages the anxiety has
                        > spread to a prefiguation of the chasm between his ideal and burning
                        > desires on the one side and naked reality on the other (144). Wanderlust
                        > may not be confined by city limits, but confined it is by nature. Small
                        > wonder, then, not merely that to travel meant to write in SAK's
                        > case, but that to write meant to travel, whereas plans for real life
                        > travel were rather meticulously circumvented and eventually abandoned,
                        > if at all possible (417-18). Garff's chapter about SAK changes of
                        > address (564-67) confirms in a humorous way how these settlements
                        > concern a basically unsettled person.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > The American critic Rebecca Solnit, whose book Wanderlust: A History of
                        > Walking appeared the same year as SAK and therefore was unavailable to
                        > the author of the later, has a brief chapter on Kierkegaard in which she
                        > concludingly writes about him and his likes: "They were in the world
                        > but not of it. A solitary walker, however short his or her route, is
                        > unsettled, between places, drawn forth into action by desire and lack,
                        > having the detachment of the traveler rather than the ties of the
                        > worker, the dweller, the member of the group."2 What is striking in
                        > this and similar passages of hers is not so much the eloquence and
                        > verbal precision, although they surpass even Garff's. Rather, it is
                        > the compelling manner in which it interfaces – or intertextualizes
                        > – wandering spirits, notably Kierkegaard and Rousseau, who otherwise
                        > seem strange bedfellows separated by time and geography, ideology and
                        > personal/artistic lineaments. Biographically speaking (of wholehearted
                        > persons), these are not birds of a feather flocking together in putative
                        > real life, yet biographically speaking (as agents of textual
                        > subjectivity and subjective agents of textuality) they are clearly
                        > instances walking together – intertextually and to the
                        > thought-provoking benefit of interpretationally inclined readers.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > One more instance that is somewhat missing in this biography of SAK is
                        > Joakim Garff himself. Like his Danish colleague Jørgen Bonde Jensen
                        > in a book called Jeg er kun en Digter: Om Søren Kierkegaard som
                        > skribent (which is listed in SAK's bibliography),3 his subject is
                        > the Kierkegaard who is not "for fastholdere," as a well-known
                        > younger Danish poet has described himself.4 A bar of wet soap is not
                        > "for fastholdere," for you can literally not hold on to it. But
                        > metaforically speaking a person like Kierkegaard is not "for
                        > fastholdere" either, for he is, in Bonde Jensen's words, one who
                        > "falls outside all designations. Not only those of the literary
                        > tradition and the national identity, but also those of the clique, the
                        > common sense, and the notion of the natural."5 To come to terms with
                        > this slippery figure, Bonde Jensen acknowledges that Kierkegaards way of
                        > writing, his authorship, as it were, cannot be separated form his
                        > intentions, no more than Bonde Jensens writing can be separated from
                        > his. Hence, he "seeks in this context to take bearings of my own
                        > point of departure, the disparity between the intellectual left and
                        > Søren Kierkegaard."
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > This is one way of coming to terms with slipperiness around you: Find
                        > your own position and be as steadfast as possible as you seek to engage
                        > your slippery surroundings (before you perhaps allow yourself to slide
                        > in one or more of its many directions). But it is not Joakim Garff's
                        > way. For one thing, there is little evidence in his production of any
                        > tangible affiliation with leftist causes. But more importantly, he
                        > possesses the breadth of view, erudition, and intellectual and stylistic
                        > authority to follow – without losing his critical bearings – his
                        > slippery subject in whatever direction its biographical complex may take
                        > him; at some point he even openly admits to the psychological
                        > inevitability of "biographically reading along" (248)."
                        >
                      • James Rovira
                        Thanks again to both Nick and Will...the references here are turning out to be very useful to me. Jim R
                        Message 11 of 16 , Jul 6 8:03 PM
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                          Thanks again to both Nick and Will...the references here are turning out to be very useful to me. 

                          Jim R

                          On 7/5/07, Will Brown < wilbro99@...> wrote:

                          Nicklekula, here is the quote I was using when I answered as I did. ~~

                          "The heath must be peculiarly suited to developing spiritual strength; here everything lies naked and unveiled before God, no place here for all those distractions, those odd nooks and crannies in which consciousness can take cover and where seriousness often has difficulty catching up with distracted thoughts. Here consciousness has to take a firm and precise grip on itself. Here on the heath one could truthfully say, 'Whither shall I flee from thy presence?'" (P&J, Hannay, p. 136) (40 III A 78)
                        • Will Brown
                          JR, the Hannay P&J book says SK was there from 3 July to 6 August, 1840. There are about 35 quotes in the book from that period. ~~~~willy ... out to ... did.
                          Message 12 of 16 , Jul 7 9:46 PM
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                            JR, the Hannay P&J book says SK was there from 3 July to 6 August, 1840. There are about 35 quotes in the book from that period.  ~~~~willy

                            --- In kierkegaardians@yahoogroups.com, "James Rovira" <jamesrovira@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Thanks again to both Nick and Will...the references here are turning out to
                            > be very useful to me.
                            >
                            > Jim R
                            >
                            > On 7/5/07, Will Brown wilbro99@... wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Nicklekula, here is the quote I was using when I answered as I did. ~~
                            > > "The heath must be peculiarly suited to developing spiritual strength;
                            > > here everything lies naked and unveiled before God, no place here for all
                            > > those distractions, those odd nooks and crannies in which consciousness can
                            > > take cover and where seriousness often has difficulty catching up with
                            > > distracted thoughts. Here consciousness has to take a firm and precise grip
                            > > on itself. Here on the heath one could truthfully say, 'Whither shall I flee
                            > > from thy presence?'" (P&J, Hannay, p. 136) (40 III A 78)
                            > >
                            >
                          • James Rovira
                            Thanks much, Will. That s Papers and Journals, right? I have the Hong s translation, but only volume 1 and 2, which stops around 1938. Annoying. Joakim
                            Message 13 of 16 , Jul 7 10:04 PM
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                              Thanks much, Will.  That's Papers and Journals, right?  I have the Hong's translation, but only volume 1 and 2, which stops around 1938.  Annoying.  Joakim Garff's bio was mentioned in the article Nick posted, though, so I have that and was able to mine it for some good stuff.

                              May try to find the other volumes in other libraries around here.

                              Thanks again,

                              Jim R

                              On 7/8/07, Will Brown < wilbro99@...> wrote:

                              JR, the Hannay P&J book says SK was there from 3 July to 6 August, 1840. There are about 35 quotes in the book from that period.  ~~ ~~willy

                            • Will Brown
                              Here is one of the entries that may interest you; did he follow through? ~~ I have been thinking of preaching for the first time in the church at Sæding, and
                              Message 14 of 16 , Jul 8 11:16 AM
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                                Here is one of the entries that may interest you; did he follow through? ~~

                                "I have been thinking of preaching for the first time in the church at Sæding, and it would have to be this Sunday. To my not inconsiderable surprise I see that the text is Mark 8:1-10 (feeding the four thousand), and I was struck by the words, 'How can one feed these men with bread here in the desert?, seeing I will be speaking in the poorest parish in the Jutland heath area."   (40 III A 66) (134-135)

                                --- In kierkegaardians@yahoogroups.com, "James Rovira" <jamesrovira@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Thanks much, Will. That's Papers and Journals, right? I have the Hong's
                                > translation, but only volume 1 and 2, which stops around 1938. Annoying.
                                > Joakim Garff's bio was mentioned in the article Nick posted, though, so I
                                > have that and was able to mine it for some good stuff.
                                >
                                > May try to find the other volumes in other libraries around here.
                                >
                                > Thanks again,
                                >
                                > Jim R
                                >
                                > On 7/8/07, Will Brown wilbro99@... wrote:
                                > >
                                > > JR, the Hannay P&J book says SK was there from 3 July to 6 August, 1840.
                                > > There are about 35 quotes in the book from that period. ~~~~willy
                                > >
                                >
                              • James Rovira
                                Ooh, that s good... Garff says this about K s first sermon: In Holmens Church, on Tuesday, Jan. 12 1841, he preached his first sermon ever. The text was a
                                Message 15 of 16 , Jul 8 12:02 PM
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                                  Ooh, that's good...

                                  Garff says this about K's first sermon:

                                  "In Holmens Church, on Tuesday, Jan. 12 1841, he preached his first sermon ever. The text was a passage formt he letter to the Philippians (1:19-25) in which Paul speaks of being split between the earthly and the heavenly..." (185).

                                  That quotation below is from 1840, isn't it?  That'd mean that, according to Garff at least, K didn't follow through.  Doesn't mean he didn't, though--just may not be any other record of it, or any record Garff had located for his bio. 

                                  Jim R

                                  On 7/8/07, Will Brown <wilbro99@...> wrote:

                                  Here is one of the entries that may interest you; did he follow through? ~~

                                  "I have been thinking of preaching for the first time in the church at S æding, and it would have to be this Sunday. To my not inconsiderable surprise I see that the text is Mark 8:1-10 (feeding the four thousand), and I was struck by the words, 'How can one feed these men with bread here in the desert?, seeing I will be speaking in the poorest parish in the Jutland heath area."   (40 III A 66) (134-135)

                                  --- In kierkegaardians@yahoogroups.com, "James Rovira" <jamesrovira@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Thanks much, Will. That's Papers and Journals, right? I have the Hong's
                                  > translation, but only volume 1 and 2, which stops around 1938. Annoying.
                                  > Joakim Garff's bio was mentioned in the article Nick posted, though, so I
                                  > have that and was able to mine it for some good stuff.
                                  >
                                  > May try to find the other volumes in other libraries around here.
                                  >
                                  > Thanks again,
                                  >
                                  > Jim R
                                  >

                                • Will Brown
                                  July, 1840 it is. ... sermon ... (1:19-25) in ... heavenly... ... according to ... had ... through? ... at Sæding, ... surprise I see ... struck ... desert?,
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Jul 8 12:14 PM
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                                    July, 1840 it is.

                                    --- In kierkegaardians@yahoogroups.com, "James Rovira" <jamesrovira@...>
                                    wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Ooh, that's good...
                                    >
                                    > Garff says this about K's first sermon:
                                    >
                                    > "In Holmens Church, on Tuesday, Jan. 12 1841, he preached his first
                                    sermon
                                    > ever. The text was a passage formt he letter to the Philippians
                                    (1:19-25) in
                                    > which Paul speaks of being split between the earthly and the
                                    heavenly..."
                                    > (185).
                                    >
                                    > That quotation below is from 1840, isn't it? That'd mean that,
                                    according to
                                    > Garff at least, K didn't follow through. Doesn't mean he didn't,
                                    > though--just may not be any other record of it, or any record Garff
                                    had
                                    > located for his bio.
                                    >
                                    > Jim R
                                    >
                                    > On 7/8/07, Will Brown wilbro99@... wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > Here is one of the entries that may interest you; did he follow
                                    through?
                                    > > ~~
                                    > >
                                    > > "I have been thinking of preaching for the first time in the church
                                    at Sæding,
                                    > > and it would have to be this Sunday. To my not inconsiderable
                                    surprise I see
                                    > > that the text is Mark 8:1-10 (feeding the four thousand), and I was
                                    struck
                                    > > by the words, 'How can one feed these men with bread here in the
                                    desert?,
                                    > > seeing I will be speaking in the poorest parish in the Jutland heath
                                    > > area." (40 III A 66) (134-135)
                                    > >
                                    > > --- In kierkegaardians@yahoogroups.com, "James Rovira" jamesrovira@
                                    > > wrote:
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Thanks much, Will. That's Papers and Journals, right? I have the
                                    Hong's
                                    > > > translation, but only volume 1 and 2, which stops around 1938.
                                    Annoying.
                                    > > > Joakim Garff's bio was mentioned in the article Nick posted,
                                    though, so
                                    > > I
                                    > > > have that and was able to mine it for some good stuff.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > May try to find the other volumes in other libraries around here.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Thanks again,
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Jim R
                                    > > >
                                    > >
                                    >
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