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Re: Bridge

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  • wilbro99
    Earlier, you made the distinction between union and transition. In light of you last message, I think we need to change some terms. I have used transition as
    Message 1 of 67 , Apr 1, 2001
      Earlier, you made the distinction between union
      and transition. In light of you last message, I think
      we need to change some terms. I have used transition
      as the process of change that ensues from the via
      negativa, the letting go, if you will, although I would
      define the condition as a state of passive observation,
      or maybe what K calls being nothing before God. I do
      not think of union as the end, but as the beginning,
      even though it lies at the end of the transition, even
      though the transition has no end. The words get in the
      way here.<br><br>So yes, pre-union there are
      perceptual changes, but those changes must, or so I see it,
      relate to the finding of oneself in self-knowledge
      first, then the rest follows. K makes this point again
      and again. I am continually drawn to this point
      because it is my experience that the shift really brings
      another sense of self into play, as is there were a
      pre-transition self and a transition self, which K defines as
      the transition from the sensuous-psychic to the
      spiritual. I see the spiritual as the concrete ground and
      the sensuous-psychic as the living day-dream, where
      one is lost in the thought of self, just as much as
      one loses touch with reality when lost in thought,
      but more subtly so. Definitely the subject/Object
      relation changes, but only after the subject/object
      relation changes.<br><br>I have just started a search of
      the web on the via negativa. All I can remember about
      it is long ago reading something by Underhill
      talking about Dionysius of Aeropagite and thinking that
      he had it right. It is not finding something, but
      losing something, and in the losing finding something of
      far greater worth than that which was lost. That is
      bit ironic because that which was lost had been seen
      as everything. I have just run across something
      about John of the Cross that looks very Kierkegaardish
      at first blush. If I am not careful I'll end up a
      scholar and get on K's caca-list.<br><br>Ok, I have run
      out of words.
    • lycansorb
      Thank you for your warm welcome Ron. You have a fine sight for a very worthy subject. Just spent the past several months in the study of Sorens Fear and
      Message 67 of 67 , Jun 12, 2001
        Thank you for your warm welcome Ron. You have a
        fine sight for a very worthy subject. Just spent the
        past several months in the study of Sorens "Fear and
        Trembling" (forgive me I am spelling and grammar impaired).
        Soren captured my interest in college after reading
        Walker Perceys Novels and Philosophical writings. So
        misunderstood by the christian community. What a pity.
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