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Re: Correction

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  • j15300
    The supreme problem of culture is that of gaining possession of one s transcendental self, of being at one and the same time the self of oneself [self to the
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 18, 2004
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      "The supreme problem of culture is that of gaining possession of
      one's transcendental self, of being at one and the same time the
      self of oneself [self to the second degree, or beyond the
      material/body temple]. Thus it should not surprise us that there is
      an absence of feeling or complete understanding of others. Lacking
      a perfect comprehension of ourselves, we can never really hope to
      know others." Novalis. Christ Jesus read/knew minds/others, from
      the perspective of reflecting Mind, Plotinean Oneness.

      "Why do you play at hazard in matters of the utmost moment? If you
      find the principles of philosophy entertaining sit down and turn
      them over in your mind all by yourself, but don't ever call yourself
      a philosopher." Epictetus, "Discourses" (3.21.17), on the occasion
      of dealing with the surround Nietzsche aphorized as "There are no
      philosophies, only philosophers."


      --- In kierkegaardians@yahoogroups.com, "Jim Stuart"
      <jimstuart@n...> wrote:

      > I feel the use of the original sentence gives a misleading
      impression of my position with regard to psychological laws. The
      sentence implies I may allow for the possibility of psychological
      laws applicable to human beings. In fact I hold to the view that it
      is not possible for there to be psychological laws which apply to
      human beings. The reason is that the concepts we use to characterise
      our mental states and actions are not the sort of concepts which are
      suitable for inclusion in natural laws.
      >
      > When I wrote the original sentence, I was thinking that perhaps
      there were psychological laws which were applicable to non-human
      animals, e.g. laws which described and predicted the behaviour of
      e.g. rats in mazes and cages. I think these sorts of laws are also
      highly dubious, but there may be laws of this sort.
      >
      > To summarise: I think that the minds and behaviour of human beings
      are of such a nature that natural laws cannot be applied to us as
      individuals. This is not to deny that the physical, chemical and
      biological micro-events inside our bodies do obey natural laws.
      >
      > Jim
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