Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Mysticism

Expand Messages
  • wilbro99
    Welcome to the world of K wearing one of his pseudonymous hats. You will find K is fond of having one pseudonym comment upon another, and in fact, he, as
    Message 1 of 67 , Feb 1, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      Welcome to the world of K wearing one of his
      pseudonymous hats. You will find K is fond of having one
      pseudonym comment upon another, and in fact, he, as
      himself, comments upon all of his hats. Here is a quote
      from the Postscript about E/O (courtesy quote bin):
      <br>"If it were to be pointed out clearly in E/O where
      the discrepancy lies, the book would have needed to
      have a religious instead of an ethical orientation�it
      is in this moment of decision that the individual
      needs divine assistance, although it is quite correct
      that one must first have understood the
      existence-relation between the esthetic and the ethical to be at
      this point-that is, by being there in passion and
      inwardness, one indeed becomes aware off of the religious-and
      of the leap. Furthermore, the definition of truth as
      inwardness, that it is upbuilding, must be explicitly
      understood before it is even religious, to say nothing of
      being Christianly religious." (CUP, Hong, pp.
      257-58)<br><br>So, you are right in that K was delineating the
      difference between the esthetic and the ethical stages. It
      is about form, not content. The key to the form is
      in this quote, or so I see it: "There, now you have
      chosen-not indeed the better part, that you will agree; but
      really you have made no choice at all, or you have chose
      only figuratively. Your choice is an aesthetic choice,
      but an aesthetic choice is no choice. In general, the
      act of choosing is a literal and strict expression of
      the ethical�The aesthetic choice is either wholly
      immediate thus no choice, or it loses itself in
      multiplicity." (E/O, Hannay, p.485)<br><br>There are two
      either/or choices. The esthetic choice is not the choice K
      is speaking to. That choice is to be found in the
      following quote: "So the mystics fault is not that he
      chooses himself, for in my opinion he does well to do
      that, his mistake is that he does not choose himself
      properly; he chooses in respect to his freedom, and yet he
      does not choose ethically. One can only choose oneself
      in respect to one's freedom when one chooses oneself
      ethically; but one can only choose oneself ethically by
      repenting oneself, and it is only by repenting oneself that
      one becomes concrete, and it is only as a concrete
      individual that one is a free individual. The mystic's
      mistake does not lie in something later but in the very
      first movement. If one takes that to be correct, then
      every withdrawal from life, every aesthetic
      self-torment is simply a further and proper consequence. The
      mystic's mistake is that in the choice he does not become
      concrete for himself, and not for God either; he chooses
      himself abstractly and therefore lacks transparency."
      (Ibid., p. 540)<br><br>This implies that the transition
      must already be in hand to make the choice, hence, the
      importance of negating the mystic choice. What I see K as
      pushing is the necessity to get past the transcendental
      self as the goal. Anyway, all of this is my take on
      the book. I'll get to the rest of your post next.
    • lycansorb
      Thank you for your warm welcome Ron. You have a fine sight for a very worthy subject. Just spent the past several months in the study of Sorens Fear and
      Message 67 of 67 , Jun 12, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        Thank you for your warm welcome Ron. You have a
        fine sight for a very worthy subject. Just spent the
        past several months in the study of Sorens "Fear and
        Trembling" (forgive me I am spelling and grammar impaired).
        Soren captured my interest in college after reading
        Walker Perceys Novels and Philosophical writings. So
        misunderstood by the christian community. What a pity.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.