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kierkegaard

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  • iain3232000
    Not sure where I found this information, but it is interesting and relevant nonetheless. I have a bunch of notebooks with many quotes, writings, and various
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 18, 2003
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      Not sure where I found this information, but it is interesting and
      relevant nonetheless. I have a bunch of notebooks with many quotes,
      writings, and various other things in them. I came across some neat
      lines, so I've decided that I would share them with you.
      Kierkegaard lived in an intellectual climate of the 'illusions of
      objectivity'- mainly science and speculative/rationalistic philosophy
      (Hegel) was becoming a dominant way of thinking and interpreting the
      world.(including ourselves) Not only did this affect the way people
      thought and acted, but it led to the existing individual forgetting
      and losing sight of his particularness, uniqueness, and authenticity.
      This is the reason why Kierkegaard's Problem: How to become a
      Christian in Christendom, is such a problem. He goes on to say
      that 'No system of thought can explain the unique experience of the
      individual.' Another 'The degree to which one is objectively secure
      in one's belief or relationship with God and Christianity is the
      degree to which one moves away from subjective truth or inwardness.'
      We must also keep in mind that when Kierkegaard was alive, the church
      of Denmark was the state religion of the time. One only had to be
      born in Denmark to be a member of the church, and hence a Christian.
      It is obvious what would have troubled K.: there was no personal
      religious experience or individual commitment necessary to be a
      Christian in Denmark. Individual commitment requires there to be a
      choice, however at birth this chioce had already been determined. The
      state religion was a contradicton in terms to K. And that's why his
      writings focus on religious indifference and hypocrisy. He even went
      so far to call it the fallacy of 'Christendom' in Denmark. I don't
      think anyone can properly interpret his work without having these
      historical thoughts in the back of their minds.
      Lastly, I found these lines from somewhere. Might have been his
      essay 'present age', not sure though I'll have to find out.- (')
      absorption in the 'outward', the external; absense of clear sense of
      individual identity and responsibility; complacent aquiescence in
      deterministic myths as opposed to serious practical commitment; a
      pervasive cult of indifference presenting itself under the guise of
      sophisticated detachment.(') K. is surely defining not only the state
      of Denmark, but also the pervasive mood of his era...(apathy,
      indifference) Thanks, Iain.
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