Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Just joined

Expand Messages
  • roncriss
    Iain, Welcome to the group. I m not familiar with that concept. Maybe you can offer some quotes from K? I ll be offline for a day or so. Hopefully not longer!
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 4, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      Iain,

      Welcome to the group. I'm not familiar with that concept. Maybe you
      can offer some quotes from K?

      I'll be offline for a day or so. Hopefully not longer! Hope you'll
      all discuss this topic without me. I'll catch up when I get back.

      ~Ron(Moderator)~

      --- In kierkegaardians@yahoogroups.com, "iain3232000"
      <iain3232000@y...> wrote:
      > Today I deceided that I would join this group, since I've a renewed
      > interest in the work and philosophy of Soren Kierkegaard. I have
      > always found his works and approach to philosophy to be appealing.
      > Just to give you some biographical info., I've taken a few courses
      in
      > existentialism and I'm majoring in philosophy. I cannot say that I
      > have an extensive knowledge of Kierkegaard, or even an adequate
      > knowledge of his thought. I do however, plan to foster this
      interest
      > in Kierkegaardian thought and hope that I'll be able to have some
      > great discussions with all of you.
      > I noticed that in the previous messages Kierkegaard's theme of
      > the 'knight of faith' was mentioned quite a few times. If I recall
      > correctly, (I read 'fear and trembling' about three years ago, so
      > it's been a while) the 'knight of faith' renounces both wish and
      > duty, (in the universal/ethical sense) so that by going against
      one's
      > duty to God one chooses the particular over the universal, and thus
      > shows faith in God. (On a subjective level)
      > An important and helpful distiction must be made between
      the 'knight
      > of faith' and the 'tragic hero'(.) Whereas the 'Knight of faith'
      > renounces his objective duty, for a higher one, (which is faith in
      > God, through the teleological suspension of the ethical)
      the 'tragic
      > hero' is represented in a similar way: by renouncing wish and duty
      at
      > one level, but replacing it with another higher duty, yet remaining
      > within the realm of the ethical or universal. (I believe that
      > Kierkegaard used Socrates as a good example of the 'tragic hero') I
      > think that this is an useful comparison.
      > Anyway, I look forward to hearing from you all and hope that we can
      > have some great discussions. sincerely, Iain.
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.