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Canebrake ER - 29 Jun 07

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  • Bob Barnes
    5:20am-8:50am, Monday, June 29, 2007 California Department of Fish & Game Canebrake Ecological Reserve South Fork Kern River riparian forest edge via Public
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 29, 2007
      5:20am-8:50am, Monday, June 29, 2007
      California Department of Fish & Game Canebrake Ecological Reserve
      South Fork Kern River riparian forest edge via Public Access Trail &
      non-public access route

      NOTE: First time in thirty years ... August birding in June, only
      without the young ... few numbers, no Tricolored Blackbirds or
      Lawrence's Goldfinches. I suspect little or no nesting. Perhaps one
      clutch was attempted, then the nesting season was done (essentially
      by early June). Very few butterflies, some dragonflies, very few
      flowers, no grasshoppers, no mosquitos. Any thoughts?

      SPECIES & NUMBERS: California Quail 33, Great Blue Heron 1,
      Red-shouldered Hawk 2, Red-tailed Hawk 2, Virginia Rail 1, Wilson's
      Snipe 1, Mourning Dove 18, Greater Roadrunner 1, White-throated Swift
      1, Nuttall's Woodpecker 5, Downy Woodpecker 2, Hairy Woodpecker 1,
      Northern Flicker 8, Western Wood-Pewee 4, Black Phoebe 4,
      Ash-throated Flycatcher 9, Western Kingbird 4, Western Scrub-Jay 6,
      Common Raven 6, Tree Swallow 15, Cliff Swallow 2, Oak Titmouse 4,
      White-breasted Nuthatch 1, Bewick's Wren 4, House Wren 6, Western
      Bluebird 3, Wrentit 2, European Starling 2, Yellow Warbler 5, Common
      Yellowthroat 14, Summer Tanager 2, Spotted Towhee 1, California
      Towhee 7, Savannah Sparrow 3, Song Sparrow 14, Black-headed Grosbeak
      1, Blue Grosbeak 3, Red-winged Blackbird 16, Bullock's Oriole 3,
      House Finch 9, House Sparrow 5 ... 41 species, 231 individuals.

      Bob Barnes, Ridgecrest




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    • yakimapark@aol.com
      Based on our regional biological survey work this year wildlife populations are going to be hurting. Bird populations will drop because of the drought. Like
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 29, 2007
        Based on our regional biological survey work this year wildlife populations
        are going to be hurting. Bird populations will drop because of the drought.
        Like in 1991 when we had 1.5 inches of rain at Elk Hills, in the late summer
        and fall we started finding owls and hawks who had died from starvation
        (assumption based on no obvious other cause and keels with little "meat" on
        them.) I would expect something similar this fall. Only this year- apparently we
        also have impacts of losses from WNV.

        Annual vegetation barely grew and germinated at all this year in the
        southern San Joaquin Valley or in the Mojave. Very few annual forbs germinated at
        all- mostly weedy species except for plants that were in dips, draws, pockets
        that collect moisture and north facing slopes.

        North of Coalinga, it was a little wetter and more annual grass growth was
        evident. But south of there in many areas in the SJV, the standing crop is
        mostly from last year.

        East of Bakersfield, we already have started to see evidence of birds and
        squirrels pecking. digging deeply in the soil looking for seedbank seeds, as
        annual seeds and fruits are not available this year for the most part.

        Its going to be a tough year for birds. And now bears and other wildlife
        are fleeing into the desert from the Oak Creek Cyn fire. So that will be
        interesting!

        I saw a Swainson's thrush in Feb near Tehachapi, on one of our project sites
        and I have seen tri-colored black birds twice in areas I wouldn't expect
        them higher in the hills and away from water. Had Swainson's thrush in my
        backyard for several weeks and heard one singing again last week (some mt. bird?).
        Also had black headed phoebe hunting the sidewalk and water over my
        swimming pool and my neighbors pool as well- Have never in seven years seen that.
        There are fewer dragon and damsel flies this year and during blunt-nosed
        leopard lizard surveys, grasshopper populations were spotty and medium to low
        compared to two years ago,

        My resident mockingbird is also imitating the resident's robin alarm call??!
        I had never noticed that before. That probably has nothing to do with
        nothing.

        Good birding! Keep cool and start hydrating before you go into the field!!
        Marcia Wolfe



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