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mugumo tree

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  • Greve Gabi
    From: caleb wothes This collection is special to me, and my family. I wrote most of these haiku in campus, under a Mugumo tree on the greenly lawn. I sat there
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 14, 2011
      From: caleb wothes

      This collection is special to me, and my family. I wrote most of these
      haiku in campus, under a Mugumo tree on the greenly lawn. I sat there
      most of the afternoons last week, silently mourning the death of my
      sister.

      departed sister--
      dry mugumo leaves gloom
      the lawn

      June dusk--
      I fight back tears under
      a mugumo

      concrete seat--
      a dry mugumo leaf keeps
      me company

      under a mugumo--
      I watch June dusk brighten
      office fluorescents

      campus lawn--
      I sadly watch rusty keys dangle
      on mugumo


      Caleb Mutua.


      quote
      The Mugumo Fig Tree of Kenya
      By: Elizabeth Mumbi Waichinga

      Mugumo is the name of a special sacred tree known to the Kikuyu
      community and many others in Kenya. Its name was inherited from the
      ancestors, and the ancestors inherited it from their ancestors.

      For some reason, the holiness of this tree has survived the ages. Even
      a cultural invasion by foreigners -which Mugo Wa Kibiro prophesied
      about and influenced the dress code of the natives and gave them a
      foreign language- didn’t destroy the sacredness of the Mugumo tree.
      Several theories have evolved about this indigenous tree.

      Some natives believe that going around this tree seven times would
      automatically change oneís sex. But no one has ever experienced this
      transformation. Others believe spirits of the ancestors and the living
      dead hover around this tree. In fact some have claimed to have heard
      and recognized voices of departed relatives.

      Mugumo is a rare tree found only in big forests like Mount Kenya. The
      Kikuyu community inhabiting the slopes of mount Kirinyaga, which has
      since been renamed Mount Kenya, considers this tree their shrine. They
      use it to commemorate their land’s independence.

      MORE in this source
      http://www.szirine.com/2004/09/20/the-mugumo-fig-tree-of-kenya/


      Thanks for sharing your sorrow and this tree!
      Gabi
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