Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [Kenya Saijiki] grevillea tree . . . topic or kigo ?

Expand Messages
  • Isabelle Prondzynski
    Dear Gabi sensei, dear all, The grevillea robusta is definitely a kigo in Kenya. It flowers during the short rains and we need to check when it drops its
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 26, 2011
      Dear Gabi sensei, dear all,

      The grevillea robusta is definitely a kigo in Kenya. It flowers during the short rains and we need to check when it drops its leaves. The fallen leaves could be a kigo too, as they are slow to decompose and therefore rather noticeable for a time. Like almost all Kenyan trees, it is an evergreen.

      Kigo : Short rains

      We could produce a kigo page with this :

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      The grevillea robusta is one of the most common trees in Nairobi and the Highlands of Kenya. It is not cultivated for its looks, but more for its uses, as it grows straight and tall and produces good timber, both for building and for firewood.

      It is quite common for large branches of this tree to be cut down with pangas, leaving the rest of the tree to recover and continue to grow. Few Kenyans notice the flowers of this tree, related to the protea of South Africa, as these are often hidden among the foliage and high up from the ground, and coincide with those of the far more showy jacaranda and tipu trees.


      Photo and text © Isabelle Prondzynski

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Grevillea Robusta

      Exotic, native to Eastern Australia

      Names : Mgrivea (Swahili), Mûkima (Kikuyu)

      A semi-deciduous, naturalised tree reaching 20m or more in height, very fast-growing, widely plantedat altitudes of 1,200 m above sea level. It does best in areas of deep soil and good rainfall, but tolerates poorer soils.

      Bark : Dark grey; rough; furrowed vertically.
      Leaves : Distrinctive; deeply divided, fern-like, up to 3 cm long, leathery olive-green above, silky silvery grey below, fallen leaves grey, stiff, slow to decompose.
      Flowers : Numerous; in one-sided golden orange spikes up to 12 cm in length; showy.
      Fruit : Dark capsules, about 1 cm long, with slender beaks, young capsule grey-green in colour; splits to release two winged seeds.
      Uses : The timber is tough and durable, used for quality furniture, veneer / plywood, fuel, posts, fencing and wooden toys. Leaves serve as fodder.

      ~ Najma Dharani, Field Guide to common trees and shrubs of East Africa, Struik Publishers, Cape Town 2002.

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


      Grevillea flower. Photo © Isabelle Prondzynski

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Haiku :

      grevillea boughs
      stand bare in the mist --
      grey sky

      saw-dust scented air
      on Landhies road --
      fallen grevilleas

      Muthurwa food vendors
      filling sacks with saw dust --
      whirring power saw

      a bulldozer bites log
      after log to load the lorries --
      sliced grevillea

      outdoor class --
      an uprooted grevillea
      on the school roof

      ~ Patrick Wafula

      a dry carpet
      of grevillea leaves-
      Landhies Road

      fallen grevillea--
      a sculptor whittles a cooking spoon
      from a stump

      ~ Andrew Otinga


      Grevillea leaves. Photo © Isabelle Prondzynski

    • Greve Gabi
      ... Dear Haiku friends from Kenya, thanks to all your efforts, we now have a great page about this great tree. Isabelle sensei, your photos are amazing !
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 2, 2011
        >
        >
        > Dear Gabi sensei, dear all,
        > The grevillea robusta is definitely a kigo in Kenya. It flowers during the short rains and we need to check when it drops its leaves. The fallen leaves could be a kigo too, as they are slow to decompose and therefore rather noticeable for a time. Like almost all Kenyan trees, it is an evergreen.

        Dear Haiku friends from Kenya,
        thanks to all your efforts, we now have a great page about this great tree.
        Isabelle sensei, your photos are amazing !

        http://kenyasaijiki.blogspot.com/2011/03/grevillea-tree.html


        Gabi
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.