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Re: [Kenya Saijiki] bat as kigo or topic?

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  • Greve Gabi
    Dear Isabelle sensei and all thanks for the interesting observations and photos ! Yes, the tree sounds like a good candidate for haiku too , let us obeserve it
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 30, 2010
      Dear Isabelle sensei and all

      thanks for the interesting observations and photos !

      Yes, the tree sounds like a good candidate for haiku too , let us
      obeserve it more closely!
      Gabi


      > Dear Gabi sensei and all,
      >
      > We may not be in a position to tell whether the bat would be a kigo or
      > topic. Maybe we do not get sufficient chances to observe the bats...
      > what do you think, Kenya haijin?
      >
      > There was a time when, every night, I used to work late in my office
      > in All Saints' Cathedral. At that time, I had a car and used to drive
      > home at night time. Whenever I went to get the car outside the
      > Cathedral, I used to pass by that wonderful mûkûyû tree which those of
      > you who came to the Cathedral for our kukai in November last year will
      > have seen (we held some of our working group sessions right under that
      > tree).
      >
      > I have forgotten what time of year it was, but the figs on this tree
      > were ripe, and there were swarms of fruit bats flying around, enjoying
      > the figs. I have no idea where those bats lived, nor what they do
      > during the rest of the year -- but they were very active during those
      > particular nights!
      >
      > I have some pictures of the tree and its fruit (by daytime) here :
      >
      > http://www.flickr.com/photos/prondis_in_kenya/2086909435/
      > http://www.flickr.com/photos/prondis_in_kenya/3220161761/
      >
      > The first was taken at the end of May, the second in January -- so I
      > wonder whether this tree bears fruit twice a year? I shall have to
      > watch it far more attentively.
      >
      > Gabi sensei, the mûkûyû tree may itself be a kigo. It is certainly THE
      > tree of the Kikuyu (gîkûyû) people, whose name is derived from this
      > tree. I have never consciously seen this tree in flower, but the figs
      > themselves are very noticeable. And I suspect that the bats take them
      > all -- I cannot remember ever having seen one of them fall to the
      > ground!
      >
      > There is also a whole avenue of mûkûyû trees in Central Park, not far
      > from the Children's Traffic Park.
      >
      > I wonder whether we have any other bats, apart from these fruit bats?
      >
      > Isabelle.
      >
      >
      > On 28 Aug 2010, at 11:25, Greve Gabi wrote:
      >
      > Dear Brian, Isabelle sensei and all
      >
      > I also love the BAT haiku.
      >
      > We have the bats here in Japan as a kigo for summer.
      > http://wkdkigodatabase03.blogspot.com/2008/01/bat-koomori.html
      >
      > How about in your country? Any seasonality our would they rather be topics?
      >
      > Gabi
      >
      >
      >
      > Brian Etole wrote:
      >
      >
      > calm afternoon--
      > a bat hangs on a loose
      > dry branch
      >
      > Brian Etole (Peacock)
      >
      > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      >
      > Dear Brian san, dear all,
      >
      >
      > I also like your second haiku, and I wish I could have seen that bat
      > with you! You have observed very well, as you tell us more about that
      > branch where the bat hangs. The only thing that you might like to
      > change, is the first line, which seems to have no real connection with
      > the main point you make in the second and third lines. You could say
      > something that would give more information to the reader, for instance
      > the place you saw the bat ("Uhuru Park" or wherever it might have
      > been). Even better might be the name of the tree ("Naivasha thorn" or
      > whatever the tree might have been).
      >
      > So, you could have :
      >
      > Naivasha thorn --
      > a bat hangs on a loose
      > dry branch
      >
      >
      > Isabelle.
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
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