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World Wildlife Fund (WWF) to give city students lessons on forests

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  • Sheetal - Karmayog
    WWF to give city students lessons on forests In the next four months, students from schools across the city will spend some time identifying trees and see for
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 13, 2011
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      WWF to give city students lessons on forests
       
      In the next four months, students from schools across the city will spend some time identifying trees and see for themselves the encroachments at the Sanjay Gandhi National Park (SGNP) at Borivli.
       
      In a bid to sensitise school kids about forests in urban areas and work towards conservation, the World Wide Fund for Nature ­ India will launch a nationwide `Cities for Forests' campaign from July 24. The United Nations General Assembly has declared 2011 as the International Year of Forests.
       
      �There are deep linkages between forests, urban habitat and human well being.

      Therefore, saving the forests is essential for the survival and expansion of our cities,� said Goldin Quadros, interim director, WWF-India. �The campaign will enhance urban understanding on the value of forests, and educating people on the utility and benefits of natural forest cover.�
       
      The 20-city campaign will culminate in the first week of October to coincide with Wildlife Week. As part of the campaign, WWF-India will also launch a website www.citiesforforests.in that will serve as a platform for participants and supporters to interact, share and document their stories and observations.
       
      Through the website, children can record their experiences and findings from their trips.

      �These findings can be in the form of stories, essays, reports, poems, videos, songs, photo, presentations, even sketches, paintings and any other creative forms to share on campaign website,� said Quadros. Day-long trips to SGNP and other green spaces in the city such as the Mahim Nature Park will help educated students on the various threats to urban forests and ways to better manage them.
       
      �Children today are just bookworms and have no understanding of urban forests. This campaign would really help in enhancing their knowledge on how important these green spaces are for the city,� said Sangeeta Ajgaonkar, teacher at the IES Modern English School, Dadar.
       
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