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4th Sat Meet Held

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  • FindStone
    Punam, Sweta, Jayshree, Rima, Rtn. Ruia shared their insights on 24th July. Punam Sawhney has been associated as a very active volunteer in many activities,
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 1, 2004
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      Punam, Sweta, Jayshree, Rima, Rtn. Ruia shared their insights on 24th July.
       
      Punam Sawhney has been associated as a very active volunteer in many activities, first in Delhi and now in Mumbai. Her stories, e.g. about responses of kids, touched our hearts. She is also involved with Insaaniyat as our level of tolerance (at all levels of daily interaction) is very low. She made an interesting observation that Delhi has higher tolerance than Mumbai. Punam exemplifies the virtues that get developed within ourselves when we get involved with helping others. She makes a strong case that we should get our children to begin helping causes while in school itself.
       
      We also discussed about collecting clothes for Assam floods and the difficulty as no organization seems to have taken the lead.
       
      Sweta Singh is involved with micro-credit programs. Hailing from Patna, she has recently moved from Delhi to Mumbai. A professional social service person, she is helping Human Rights First, a NGO in Worli, develop micro-finance programs in slums. Helping form groups of 20 women saving even Rs. 10 a month enables a) a source of emergency funds at no or low interest, b) a group willing to help each other and share ideas, and c) empowerment of women. She seeks help in identifying contacts in slums, and in networking with other similar or complementary NGOs.
       
      Jayshree, a volunteer, is an income-tax practitioner, helping Sweta.
       
      Rima Kashyap publishes the bi-monthly NGOConnect magazine. She wants stories of events and experiences from NGOs. She does not want brochures. She wants news. She wants volunteers too. Rima is also involved with Shakti.
       
      Rotarian Ramprasad Ruia shared the various social service activities that Rotary, in general, and his club, Hill South, and he, in particular are doing. One project he elaborated on is an Eye Bank project. He explained the efforts that they put in to explain to hospital administrators, doctors, and nurses about talking to patients and their families about the need and procedure of Cornea Donations. They now get an average of 50 corneas per month. Considering that there are so many people whose blindness can go away with a simple cornea operation, he expressed frustration at not being able to spread the message of donation widely enough.
       
      My observations were:
       
      - There is a clear need for info to be publicly available e.g. what is the project, its impact, appeal for help, forms for helping, etc. e.g. what is the form to fill if one wants to donate one's eyes after death? what would be the procedure involved at that time? etc.
       
      - So I would urge you to send all data about your activities so that we can put it up free on www.karmayog.com . The notion of informing when people contact you is a little out-dated. 2 main reasons - the net is an effective medium; and people don't have time to contact to get info.
       
      - There is a clear need to sensitise people about the impact on a beneficiary. This will also lead to better appreciation and support for the NGO. e.g. is outside help really needed to get 20 women to save Rs. 10 per month? is a formal group needed to borrow Rs. 200 or 500? what are the consequences of not being able to borrow, and of being able to borrow, etc.
       
      - Annual Reports and websites are effective ways of doing this via stories, testimonials, statistics, etc. But many don't stress this enough or, unfortunately write it in a dispassionate way.
       
      - There is a disconnect between Rotary and NGOs. Awareness, appreciation, co-ordination, support, etc. need to be built on. In my opinion, Karmayog could and should be used by both groups for disseminating info to each other, as there does not appear to be any other easy medium.
       
      - Checklists, templates, etc. are useful so do email these for displaying on the site e.g. format for sending a proposal to a Rotary Club.
       
      - Do post your brochures, annual reports, forms, appeal letters, etc. to us.
       
      See you next Saturday.
      Thanks
      Vinay
    • Punam Sawhney
      Hi! Ruchika, What u read in the report below was merely me sharing of my experience in Delhi and Mumbai. MOst of my formative years have been in Delhi. School
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 11, 2004
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        Hi! Ruchika,
        What u read in the report below was merely me sharing of my experience in Delhi and Mumbai. MOst of my formative years have been in Delhi. School - Springdales, College _ Hindu  in delhi University and working wiht a Computer firm, then Delhi Saksharta Samiti and couple of other NGO's. Then I shifted to BBy in 1997. all those years i never felt the presence of a prejudice against a community as strongly as i felt it in BBY. Coming from the Delhi mindset it came as a shock to me when all my neighbours reacted strongly to me employing a MUslim as a driver !! There objection was he looks like a muslim and he reads NAmaz five times a day !! I said good he prays for all four of us  too!! Since we dont do much of it ourselves.... and he is a very good driver, well mannered and polite. That is the kind of person i needed to take the children or me around. It was later that i found out that he had a keen mind, rembered and followed current issues and national politics with great interest !! I have always had long interesting conversations with him on our trips back and forth... sharing my insaaniyat work with him and his sharing his views. He has become a part of our family and will I hope remain so for years to come!!
         
        Weather any officail documnets or studies about this prejudice exsists or not i may not be able ot tell you. However one of my other co -worker in Insaaniyat whose name is Jairus Banaji and who has a long and adventrous history in BBy maybe able to help you more. I am sending u his email id and u can write to him.
         
        Insaaniyat is a body that came up post the riots in Godhra and it is a net based body with no registered office. It has several sections and i am associated with the schools group because we felt very strongly that prejudices of all kind make their way into childrens minds early on in life.... say between the classes of vii- ix and if at that tiem they can be made to just open up their mind and question things being thrown at them... it would make a difference to them as adults...
        nothing in our education system ...as it has turned out today lets kids question too much.... and in schools where their are 45-50 students in a class and the syllabus is a struggle ... teachers whose job it used to be to develop enquiring minds.... ar ebusy making every student tow a specific line so they dont have to check work...all write the same stuff. Kids are encouraged to mugup and write verbatim form the book ... what are we doing to our kids????Producing Robots???
        In such a set up where is the time for a teacher to work at the minds of children and handle issues which no doubt come up in their mind but never get addressed. SUPW periods in schools are used for teaching stiching?? How is that socially useful or productive?? Value education periods, whcih can most easily be used to discuss important national and international issues , are taken as remedial clasees. 
        So in schools that were willing we took this tiem and started kids workshops... making it a mehtod fo rkids to realise that people were not very differnt from each other .. helping them go into the role of say a terrorist, or a victim , media or some such group and thinking about their role and situation inlife... just to make them think...
        the things the kids came up with were so interesting!1
        will send u more if u are interested or we cna try and meet and talk oneof these days.
        with warm regards
        Punam
         
        jairus@... - Jairus Banaji

        Ruchika Bahl <ruchikabahl@...> wrote:
         
        Please reply back at  ruchikabahl@...
         
        Could I get more information on Insanniyat?? Was curious to know more about ' Delhi has more tolerance than Mumbai"?...is there a study supporting this. I am very interested in getting more details on this.Could Punam Sawhney please respond to this.?
         
        Many Thanks
        Ruchika

        Ruchika Bahl
        Director
        Law For All Initiative
        Ashoka:Innovators For the Public
        Flat no 6,Bina Apts, Guru Gangeshwar Marg,
        6th Road, Khar(W),
        Mumbai-400052.
        India.
        Tel no: 022-26056773,26047635
        Reply Email: ruchikabahl@...
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: FindStone
        Sent: Sunday, August 01, 2004 2:23 PM
        Subject: [karmayog] 4th Sat Meet Held

        Punam, Sweta, Jayshree, Rima, Rtn. Ruia shared their insights on 24th July.
         
        Punam Sawhney has been associated as a very active volunteer in many activities, first in Delhi and now in Mumbai. Her stories, e.g. about responses of kids, touched our hearts. She is also involved with Insaaniyat as our level of tolerance (at all levels of daily interaction) is very low. She made an interesting observation that Delhi has higher tolerance than Mumbai. Punam exemplifies the virtues that get developed within ourselves when we get involved with helping others. She makes a strong case that we should get our children to begin helping causes while in school itself.
         
        We also discussed about collecting clothes for Assam floods and the difficulty as no organization seems to have taken the lead.
         
        Sweta Singh is involved with micro-credit programs. Hailing from Patna, she has recently moved from Delhi to Mumbai. A professional social service person, she is helping Human Rights First, a NGO in Worli, develop micro-finance programs in slums. Helping form groups of 20 women saving even Rs. 10 a month enables a) a source of emergency funds at no or low interest, b) a group willing to help each other and share ideas, and c) empowerment of women. She seeks help in identifying contacts in slums, and in networking with other similar or complementary NGOs.
         
        Jayshree, a volunteer, is an income-tax practitioner, helping Sweta.
         
        Rima Kashyap publishes the bi-monthly NGOConnect magazine. She wants stories of events and experiences from NGOs. She does not want brochures. She wants news. She wants volunteers too. Rima is also involved with Shakti.
         
        Rotarian Ramprasad Ruia shared the various social service activities that Rotary, in general, and his club, Hill South, and he, in particular are doing. One project he elaborated on is an Eye Bank project. He explained the efforts that they put in to explain to hospital administrators, doctors, and nurses about talking to patients and their families about the need and procedure of Cornea Donations. They now get an average of 50 corneas per month. Considering that there are so many people whose blindness can go away with a simple cornea operation, he expressed frustration at not being able to spread the message of donation widely enough.
         
        My observations were:
         
        - There is a clear need for info to be publicly available e.g. what is the project, its impact, appeal for help, forms for helping, etc. e.g. what is the form to fill if one wants to donate one's eyes after death? what would be the procedure involved at that time? etc.
         
        - So I would urge you to send all data about your activities so that we can put it up free on www.karmayog.com . The notion of informing when people contact you is a little out-dated. 2 main reasons - the net is an effective medium; and people don't have time to contact to get info.
         
        - There is a clear need to sensitise people about the impact on a beneficiary. This will also lead to better appreciation and support for the NGO. e.g. is outside help really needed to get 20 women to save Rs. 10 per month? is a formal group needed to borrow Rs. 200 or 500? what are the consequences of not being able to borrow, and of being able to borrow, etc.
         
        - Annual Reports and websites are effective ways of doing this via stories, testimonials, statistics, etc. But many don't stress this enough or, unfortunately write it in a dispassionate way.
         
        - There is a disconnect between Rotary and NGOs. Awareness, appreciation, co-ordination, support, etc. need to be built on. In my opinion, Karmayog could and should be used by both groups for disseminating info to each other, as there does not appear to be any other easy medium.
         
        - Checklists, templates, etc. are useful so do email these for displaying on the site e.g. format for sending a proposal to a Rotary Club.
         
        - Do post your brochures, annual reports, forms, appeal letters, etc. to us.
         
        See you next Saturday.
        Thanks
        Vinay



        All views expressed are of the original sender even if posted by Vinay or Karmayog.



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