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The Kanban Lens

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  • netherby_uk
    I just blogged this at... But I thought I d share the text in full on the list. The Kanban Lens is a new concept I ve added to me public talks and we ve
    Message 1 of 20 , Oct 18, 2013
      I just blogged this at...


      But I thought I'd share the text in full on the list. The Kanban Lens is a new concept I've added to me public talks and we've incorporated into the Foundation level curriculum for certified classes from Lean Kanban University. Here is the blog text...

      Regular readers who follow everything I post may already have spotted that I introduced a new way of thinking about Kanban. Like almost all of these "new" things, it isn't new at all. In fact, the concept existed in my first book, Agile Management, published over a decade ago. It took Andy Carmichael attending my coaching masterclass in Hamburg earlier this year to remind me of it. The Kanban Method is unpinned by the concept of "flow." Once again, something hiding in plain sight that I hadn't been thinking about or articulating clearly for a while.


      So with my Paris and Utrecht, Lean Kanban Conference key notes, I re-introduced "flow" to the Kanban party. I used the term "Core Enabling Concepts" but we are likely to use the nickname "Kanban Lens" because they give us a way to see things - a way to see how an organization is currently structured and functioning and to then "kanbanize" that existing structure without reorganizing it. Sometimes, a different way to see is all it takes to reveal obviously conflicting policies and catalyze improvements.


      The Kanban Lens

      1. Service-orientation
      2. Service delivery involves workflow
      3. Work flows through a series of information discovery activities

      Looking at a current organization through a service-oriented lens and seeing services where currently people only see functions and specializations is liberating and empowering. Service-orientation implies service delivery and therefore there must be customers for those services. It is this lens that enables the outside-in systems thinking approach to implementing Kanban that we cover in the Foundation level class curriculum from Lean Kanban University.


      That work flows through a series of information discovery activities is a concept borrowed from Lean Product Development. I first saw Don Reinertsen describe it in the early 1990s but he in turn credits the idea to Marvin Patterson. Michael Kennedy has also documented the same idea and I've tried to standardize on using Kennedy's language.


      I think many Lean consultants and many in the software development and IT space with an understanding of Lean (from manufacturing) miss the subtlety of this third concept - "work flows through a series of information discovery activities." It does not say, "work flows though a series of people with specialist skills." When mapping value streams, Lean people tell you to "follow the work." I think this is a red herring for knowledge work. Trying to map a complicated value creation network and then visualize it is a distraction. It gives you an overly complicated system and the many loops and joins in the network make visualization challenging. Following the work, through a series of people, also institutionalizes the handoffs between the people and masks important information about the activities performed by any one person in the chain. Since Agile Management over a decade ago, I've cautioned against this. We aren't interested in the passing of work between the people, we are interested in the dominant activity to discover new information at any given time in the workflow. This chain of activities tends to be much simpler and leads to significantly simpler and easier to comprehend visualization. Yes, the tickets on the board have to circulate if the process is iterative - so what? That is just a reflection of reality - design the kanban system accordingly.


      Viewing organizations through a Kanban Lens opens up new possibilities and enables us to set up extensive networks of interdependent kanban systems. Kanban scales in the enterprise by scaling out in a service-oriented fashion and it self-levels to optimize service delivery across a complex set of services, customers and their demands, through the use of a system of systems feedback loop. We call this system of systems feedback loop, the Operations Review.


      By adding the Kanban Lens to the literature and the teaching curriculum, we are helping people understand how to establish deep and extensive Kanban implementations that deliver significantly improved service delivery at enterprise scale. The Kanban Lens isn't new, it's just something that was hiding in plain sight and I was taking it for granted. By making it explicit I believe Kanban will be easier to teach and easier to adopt.

    • netherby_uk
      And this time with the blog URL http://www.djaa.com/kanban-lens ... I just blogged this at... But I thought I d share the text in full on the list. The Kanban
      Message 2 of 20 , Oct 18, 2013
        And this time with the blog URL
        http://www.djaa.com/kanban-lens

        :-/ sorry

         



        ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:

        I just blogged this at...


        But I thought I'd share the text in full on the list. The Kanban Lens is a new concept I've added to me public talks and we've incorporated into the Foundation level curriculum for certified classes from Lean Kanban University. Here is the blog text...

        Regular readers who follow everything I post may already have spotted that I introduced a new way of thinking about Kanban. Like almost all of these "new" things, it isn't new at all. In fact, the concept existed in my first book, Agile Management, published over a decade ago. It took Andy Carmichael attending my coaching masterclass in Hamburg earlier this year to remind me of it. The Kanban Method is unpinned by the concept of "flow." Once again, something hiding in plain sight that I hadn't been thinking about or articulating clearly for a while.


        So with my Paris and Utrecht, Lean Kanban Conference key notes, I re-introduced "flow" to the Kanban party. I used the term "Core Enabling Concepts" but we are likely to use the nickname "Kanban Lens" because they give us a way to see things - a way to see how an organization is currently structured and functioning and to then "kanbanize" that existing structure without reorganizing it. Sometimes, a different way to see is all it takes to reveal obviously conflicting policies and catalyze improvements.


        The Kanban Lens

        1. Service-orientation
        2. Service delivery involves workflow
        3. Work flows through a series of information discovery activities

        Looking at a current organization through a service-oriented lens and seeing services where currently people only see functions and specializations is liberating and empowering. Service-orientation implies service delivery and therefore there must be customers for those services. It is this lens that enables the outside-in systems thinking approach to implementing Kanban that we cover in the Foundation level class curriculum from Lean Kanban University.


        That work flows through a series of information discovery activities is a concept borrowed from Lean Product Development. I first saw Don Reinertsen describe it in the early 1990s but he in turn credits the idea to Marvin Patterson. Michael Kennedy has also documented the same idea and I've tried to standardize on using Kennedy's language.


        I think many Lean consultants and many in the software development and IT space with an understanding of Lean (from manufacturing) miss the subtlety of this third concept - "work flows through a series of information discovery activities." It does not say, "work flows though a series of people with specialist skills." When mapping value streams, Lean people tell you to "follow the work." I think this is a red herring for knowledge work. Trying to map a complicated value creation network and then visualize it is a distraction. It gives you an overly complicated system and the many loops and joins in the network make visualization challenging. Following the work, through a series of people, also institutionalizes the handoffs between the people and masks important information about the activities performed by any one person in the chain. Since Agile Management over a decade ago, I've cautioned against this. We aren't interested in the passing of work between the people, we are interested in the dominant activity to discover new information at any given time in the workflow. This chain of activities tends to be much simpler and leads to significantly simpler and easier to comprehend visualization. Yes, the tickets on the board have to circulate if the process is iterative - so what? That is just a reflection of reality - design the kanban system accordingly.


        Viewing organizations through a Kanban Lens opens up new possibilities and enables us to set up extensive networks of interdependent kanban systems. Kanban scales in the enterprise by scaling out in a service-oriented fashion and it self-levels to optimize service delivery across a complex set of services, customers and their demands, through the use of a system of systems feedback loop. We call this system of systems feedback loop, the Operations Review.


        By adding the Kanban Lens to the literature and the teaching curriculum, we are helping people understand how to establish deep and extensive Kanban implementations that deliver significantly improved service delivery at enterprise scale. The Kanban Lens isn't new, it's just something that was hiding in plain sight and I was taking it for granted. By making it explicit I believe Kanban will be easier to teach and easier to adopt.

      • Jeff Anderson
        David, I have always been super excited by the service oriented focus of kanban. The idea of iteratively of all a service oriented organization has always
        Message 3 of 20 , Oct 19, 2013
          David,

          I have always been super excited by the service oriented focus of kanban. The idea of iteratively of all a service oriented organization has always appealed to the architecture geek inside me. Plus I seen it actually works :-)

          Your last point about information discovery activities is one of those eureka moments for me. I think I have been using it although not explicitly without realizing it.

          Whenever I start  building a kanban system with clients, I "follow the work". This creates a crazy kanban system is basically unmanageable, too many columns, too many handoffs, too many cues.

          What ends up happening next to create a dramatic simplification, based on the things that need to get done, based on work state, not on who does it.  I find your post incredibly helpful in articulating this thinking, next time around I think I'm going to start with this.

          Very exciting stuff David!
          Jeff



          On Sat, Oct 19, 2013 at 12:34 AM, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:
           

          And this time with the blog URL
          http://www.djaa.com/kanban-lens

          :-/ sorry


           



          ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:

          I just blogged this at...


          But I thought I'd share the text in full on the list. The Kanban Lens is a new concept I've added to me public talks and we've incorporated into the Foundation level curriculum for certified classes from Lean Kanban University. Here is the blog text...

          Regular readers who follow everything I post may already have spotted that I introduced a new way of thinking about Kanban. Like almost all of these "new" things, it isn't new at all. In fact, the concept existed in my first book, Agile Management, published over a decade ago. It took Andy Carmichael attending my coaching masterclass in Hamburg earlier this year to remind me of it. The Kanban Method is unpinned by the concept of "flow." Once again, something hiding in plain sight that I hadn't been thinking about or articulating clearly for a while.


          So with my Paris and Utrecht, Lean Kanban Conference key notes, I re-introduced "flow" to the Kanban party. I used the term "Core Enabling Concepts" but we are likely to use the nickname "Kanban Lens" because they give us a way to see things - a way to see how an organization is currently structured and functioning and to then "kanbanize" that existing structure without reorganizing it. Sometimes, a different way to see is all it takes to reveal obviously conflicting policies and catalyze improvements.


          The Kanban Lens

          1. Service-orientation
          2. Service delivery involves workflow
          3. Work flows through a series of information discovery activities

          Looking at a current organization through a service-oriented lens and seeing services where currently people only see functions and specializations is liberating and empowering. Service-orientation implies service delivery and therefore there must be customers for those services. It is this lens that enables the outside-in systems thinking approach to implementing Kanban that we cover in the Foundation level class curriculum from Lean Kanban University.


          That work flows through a series of information discovery activities is a concept borrowed from Lean Product Development. I first saw Don Reinertsen describe it in the early 1990s but he in turn credits the idea to Marvin Patterson. Michael Kennedy has also documented the same idea and I've tried to standardize on using Kennedy's language.


          I think many Lean consultants and many in the software development and IT space with an understanding of Lean (from manufacturing) miss the subtlety of this third concept - "work flows through a series of information discovery activities." It does not say, "work flows though a series of people with specialist skills." When mapping value streams, Lean people tell you to "follow the work." I think this is a red herring for knowledge work. Trying to map a complicated value creation network and then visualize it is a distraction. It gives you an overly complicated system and the many loops and joins in the network make visualization challenging. Following the work, through a series of people, also institutionalizes the handoffs between the people and masks important information about the activities performed by any one person in the chain. Since Agile Management over a decade ago, I've cautioned against this. We aren't interested in the passing of work between the people, we are interested in the dominant activity to discover new information at any given time in the workflow. This chain of activities tends to be much simpler and leads to significantly simpler and easier to comprehend visualization. Yes, the tickets on the board have to circulate if the process is iterative - so what? That is just a reflection of reality - design the kanban system accordingly.


          Viewing organizations through a Kanban Lens opens up new possibilities and enables us to set up extensive networks of interdependent kanban systems. Kanban scales in the enterprise by scaling out in a service-oriented fashion and it self-levels to optimize service delivery across a complex set of services, customers and their demands, through the use of a system of systems feedback loop. We call this system of systems feedback loop, the Operations Review.


          By adding the Kanban Lens to the literature and the teaching curriculum, we are helping people understand how to establish deep and extensive Kanban implementations that deliver significantly improved service delivery at enterprise scale. The Kanban Lens isn't new, it's just something that was hiding in plain sight and I was taking it for granted. By making it explicit I believe Kanban will be easier to teach and easier to adopt.




          --
        • netherby_uk
          Thanks Jeff. It is amazing how it can take me a decade to discover how to communicate an idea cleanly and simply enough that people can receive it and
          Message 4 of 20 , Oct 19, 2013
            Thanks Jeff. It is amazing how it can take me a decade to discover how to communicate an idea cleanly and simply enough that people can receive it and comprehend it as intended. It's a continual learning loop for me. I truly hope that now we have something that will kick people into the realization this is a "different kind of Lean" we are talking about! And hence, why I'm de-emphasizing Lean as it just distracts people from what we are really trying to achieve - better management in knowledge worker industries.


            ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <Thomasjeffreyandersontwin@...> wrote:

            David,

            I have always been super excited by the service oriented focus of kanban. The idea of iteratively of all a service oriented organization has always appealed to the architecture geek inside me. Plus I seen it actually works :-)

            Your last point about information discovery activities is one of those eureka moments for me. I think I have been using it although not explicitly without realizing it.

            Whenever I start  building a kanban system with clients, I "follow the work". This creates a crazy kanban system is basically unmanageable, too many columns, too many handoffs, too many cues.

            What ends up happening next to create a dramatic simplification, based on the things that need to get done, based on work state, not on who does it.  I find your post incredibly helpful in articulating this thinking, next time around I think I'm going to start with this.

            Very exciting stuff David!
            Jeff



            On Sat, Oct 19, 2013 at 12:34 AM, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:
             

            And this time with the blog URL
            http://www.djaa.com/kanban-lens

            :-/ sorry


             



            ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:

            I just blogged this at...


            But I thought I'd share the text in full on the list. The Kanban Lens is a new concept I've added to me public talks and we've incorporated into the Foundation level curriculum for certified classes from Lean Kanban University. Here is the blog text...

            Regular readers who follow everything I post may already have spotted that I introduced a new way of thinking about Kanban. Like almost all of these "new" things, it isn't new at all. In fact, the concept existed in my first book, Agile Management, published over a decade ago. It took Andy Carmichael attending my coaching masterclass in Hamburg earlier this year to remind me of it. The Kanban Method is unpinned by the concept of "flow." Once again, something hiding in plain sight that I hadn't been thinking about or articulating clearly for a while.


            So with my Paris and Utrecht, Lean Kanban Conference key notes, I re-introduced "flow" to the Kanban party. I used the term "Core Enabling Concepts" but we are likely to use the nickname "Kanban Lens" because they give us a way to see things - a way to see how an organization is currently structured and functioning and to then "kanbanize" that existing structure without reorganizing it. Sometimes, a different way to see is all it takes to reveal obviously conflicting policies and catalyze improvements.


            The Kanban Lens

            1. Service-orientation
            2. Service delivery involves workflow
            3. Work flows through a series of information discovery activities

            Looking at a current organization through a service-oriented lens and seeing services where currently people only see functions and specializations is liberating and empowering. Service-orientation implies service delivery and therefore there must be customers for those services. It is this lens that enables the outside-in systems thinking approach to implementing Kanban that we cover in the Foundation level class curriculum from Lean Kanban University.


            That work flows through a series of information discovery activities is a concept borrowed from Lean Product Development. I first saw Don Reinertsen describe it in the early 1990s but he in turn credits the idea to Marvin Patterson. Michael Kennedy has also documented the same idea and I've tried to standardize on using Kennedy's language.


            I think many Lean consultants and many in the software development and IT space with an understanding of Lean (from manufacturing) miss the subtlety of this third concept - "work flows through a series of information discovery activities." It does not say, "work flows though a series of people with specialist skills." When mapping value streams, Lean people tell you to "follow the work." I think this is a red herring for knowledge work. Trying to map a complicated value creation network and then visualize it is a distraction. It gives you an overly complicated system and the many loops and joins in the network make visualization challenging. Following the work, through a series of people, also institutionalizes the handoffs between the people and masks important information about the activities performed by any one person in the chain. Since Agile Management over a decade ago, I've cautioned against this. We aren't interested in the passing of work between the people, we are interested in the dominant activity to discover new information at any given time in the workflow. This chain of activities tends to be much simpler and leads to significantly simpler and easier to comprehend visualization. Yes, the tickets on the board have to circulate if the process is iterative - so what? That is just a reflection of reality - design the kanban system accordingly.


            Viewing organizations through a Kanban Lens opens up new possibilities and enables us to set up extensive networks of interdependent kanban systems. Kanban scales in the enterprise by scaling out in a service-oriented fashion and it self-levels to optimize service delivery across a complex set of services, customers and their demands, through the use of a system of systems feedback loop. We call this system of systems feedback loop, the Operations Review.


            By adding the Kanban Lens to the literature and the teaching curriculum, we are helping people understand how to establish deep and extensive Kanban implementations that deliver significantly improved service delivery at enterprise scale. The Kanban Lens isn't new, it's just something that was hiding in plain sight and I was taking it for granted. By making it explicit I believe Kanban will be easier to teach and easier to adopt.




            --
          • Jeff Anderson
            the lean term does carry a lot of baggage with it, and always bumping into people who were trying to eliminate waste, reduce headcount etc. And call it lean,
            Message 5 of 20 , Oct 19, 2013
               the lean term does carry a lot of baggage with it, and always bumping into people who were trying to eliminate waste, reduce headcount etc. And call it lean,

              Glad to see these ideas are coming out cleanly, the one interesting thing  I've always found about kanban is that it is complex  without being complicated. But the subtlety is surprising, and some people completely miss it. I know I still have to work at it :-)
              Jeff


              On Sat, Oct 19, 2013 at 11:22 AM, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:
               

              Thanks Jeff. It is amazing how it can take me a decade to discover how to communicate an idea cleanly and simply enough that people can receive it and comprehend it as intended. It's a continual learning loop for me. I truly hope that now we have something that will kick people into the realization this is a "different kind of Lean" we are talking about! And hence, why I'm de-emphasizing Lean as it just distracts people from what we are really trying to achieve - better management in knowledge worker industries.



              ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <Thomasjeffreyandersontwin@...> wrote:

              David,

              I have always been super excited by the service oriented focus of kanban. The idea of iteratively of all a service oriented organization has always appealed to the architecture geek inside me. Plus I seen it actually works :-)

              Your last point about information discovery activities is one of those eureka moments for me. I think I have been using it although not explicitly without realizing it.

              Whenever I start  building a kanban system with clients, I "follow the work". This creates a crazy kanban system is basically unmanageable, too many columns, too many handoffs, too many cues.

              What ends up happening next to create a dramatic simplification, based on the things that need to get done, based on work state, not on who does it.  I find your post incredibly helpful in articulating this thinking, next time around I think I'm going to start with this.

              Very exciting stuff David!
              Jeff



              On Sat, Oct 19, 2013 at 12:34 AM, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:
               

              And this time with the blog URL
              http://www.djaa.com/kanban-lens

              :-/ sorry


               



              ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:

              I just blogged this at...


              But I thought I'd share the text in full on the list. The Kanban Lens is a new concept I've added to me public talks and we've incorporated into the Foundation level curriculum for certified classes from Lean Kanban University. Here is the blog text...

              Regular readers who follow everything I post may already have spotted that I introduced a new way of thinking about Kanban. Like almost all of these "new" things, it isn't new at all. In fact, the concept existed in my first book, Agile Management, published over a decade ago. It took Andy Carmichael attending my coaching masterclass in Hamburg earlier this year to remind me of it. The Kanban Method is unpinned by the concept of "flow." Once again, something hiding in plain sight that I hadn't been thinking about or articulating clearly for a while.


              So with my Paris and Utrecht, Lean Kanban Conference key notes, I re-introduced "flow" to the Kanban party. I used the term "Core Enabling Concepts" but we are likely to use the nickname "Kanban Lens" because they give us a way to see things - a way to see how an organization is currently structured and functioning and to then "kanbanize" that existing structure without reorganizing it. Sometimes, a different way to see is all it takes to reveal obviously conflicting policies and catalyze improvements.


              The Kanban Lens

              1. Service-orientation
              2. Service delivery involves workflow
              3. Work flows through a series of information discovery activities

              Looking at a current organization through a service-oriented lens and seeing services where currently people only see functions and specializations is liberating and empowering. Service-orientation implies service delivery and therefore there must be customers for those services. It is this lens that enables the outside-in systems thinking approach to implementing Kanban that we cover in the Foundation level class curriculum from Lean Kanban University.


              That work flows through a series of information discovery activities is a concept borrowed from Lean Product Development. I first saw Don Reinertsen describe it in the early 1990s but he in turn credits the idea to Marvin Patterson. Michael Kennedy has also documented the same idea and I've tried to standardize on using Kennedy's language.


              I think many Lean consultants and many in the software development and IT space with an understanding of Lean (from manufacturing) miss the subtlety of this third concept - "work flows through a series of information discovery activities." It does not say, "work flows though a series of people with specialist skills." When mapping value streams, Lean people tell you to "follow the work." I think this is a red herring for knowledge work. Trying to map a complicated value creation network and then visualize it is a distraction. It gives you an overly complicated system and the many loops and joins in the network make visualization challenging. Following the work, through a series of people, also institutionalizes the handoffs between the people and masks important information about the activities performed by any one person in the chain. Since Agile Management over a decade ago, I've cautioned against this. We aren't interested in the passing of work between the people, we are interested in the dominant activity to discover new information at any given time in the workflow. This chain of activities tends to be much simpler and leads to significantly simpler and easier to comprehend visualization. Yes, the tickets on the board have to circulate if the process is iterative - so what? That is just a reflection of reality - design the kanban system accordingly.


              Viewing organizations through a Kanban Lens opens up new possibilities and enables us to set up extensive networks of interdependent kanban systems. Kanban scales in the enterprise by scaling out in a service-oriented fashion and it self-levels to optimize service delivery across a complex set of services, customers and their demands, through the use of a system of systems feedback loop. We call this system of systems feedback loop, the Operations Review.


              By adding the Kanban Lens to the literature and the teaching curriculum, we are helping people understand how to establish deep and extensive Kanban implementations that deliver significantly improved service delivery at enterprise scale. The Kanban Lens isn't new, it's just something that was hiding in plain sight and I was taking it for granted. By making it explicit I believe Kanban will be easier to teach and easier to adopt.







              --
            • netherby_uk
              Complex without being complicated has a nice ring to it. It is both simple and complex but not complicated. Hence, it should be easy to comprehend and get
              Message 6 of 20 , Oct 19, 2013
                "Complex without being complicated" has a nice ring to it. It is both simple and complex but not complicated. Hence, it should be easy to comprehend and get started but many of the benefits are emergent and counter-intuitive. Hence, learning to trust it is based on experience and hearing stories from others than from deducing any particular outcome. This doesn't make it the easiest thing to "sell". ;-)

                David
                http://djaa.com/

                 



                ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <Thomasjeffreyandersontwin@...> wrote:

                 the lean term does carry a lot of baggage with it, and always bumping into people who were trying to eliminate waste, reduce headcount etc. And call it lean,

                Glad to see these ideas are coming out cleanly, the one interesting thing  I've always found about kanban is that it is complex  without being complicated. But the subtlety is surprising, and some people completely miss it. I know I still have to work at it :-)
                Jeff


                On Sat, Oct 19, 2013 at 11:22 AM, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:
                 

                Thanks Jeff. It is amazing how it can take me a decade to discover how to communicate an idea cleanly and simply enough that people can receive it and comprehend it as intended. It's a continual learning loop for me. I truly hope that now we have something that will kick people into the realization this is a "different kind of Lean" we are talking about! And hence, why I'm de-emphasizing Lean as it just distracts people from what we are really trying to achieve - better management in knowledge worker industries.



                ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <Thomasjeffreyandersontwin@...> wrote:

                David,

                I have always been super excited by the service oriented focus of kanban. The idea of iteratively of all a service oriented organization has always appealed to the architecture geek inside me. Plus I seen it actually works :-)

                Your last point about information discovery activities is one of those eureka moments for me. I think I have been using it although not explicitly without realizing it.

                Whenever I start  building a kanban system with clients, I "follow the work". This creates a crazy kanban system is basically unmanageable, too many columns, too many handoffs, too many cues.

                What ends up happening next to create a dramatic simplification, based on the things that need to get done, based on work state, not on who does it.  I find your post incredibly helpful in articulating this thinking, next time around I think I'm going to start with this.

                Very exciting stuff David!
                Jeff



                On Sat, Oct 19, 2013 at 12:34 AM, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:
                 

                And this time with the blog URL
                http://www.djaa.com/kanban-lens

                :-/ sorry


                 



                ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:

                I just blogged this at...


                But I thought I'd share the text in full on the list. The Kanban Lens is a new concept I've added to me public talks and we've incorporated into the Foundation level curriculum for certified classes from Lean Kanban University. Here is the blog text...

                Regular readers who follow everything I post may already have spotted that I introduced a new way of thinking about Kanban. Like almost all of these "new" things, it isn't new at all. In fact, the concept existed in my first book, Agile Management, published over a decade ago. It took Andy Carmichael attending my coaching masterclass in Hamburg earlier this year to remind me of it. The Kanban Method is unpinned by the concept of "flow." Once again, something hiding in plain sight that I hadn't been thinking about or articulating clearly for a while.


                So with my Paris and Utrecht, Lean Kanban Conference key notes, I re-introduced "flow" to the Kanban party. I used the term "Core Enabling Concepts" but we are likely to use the nickname "Kanban Lens" because they give us a way to see things - a way to see how an organization is currently structured and functioning and to then "kanbanize" that existing structure without reorganizing it. Sometimes, a different way to see is all it takes to reveal obviously conflicting policies and catalyze improvements.


                The Kanban Lens

                1. Service-orientation
                2. Service delivery involves workflow
                3. Work flows through a series of information discovery activities

                Looking at a current organization through a service-oriented lens and seeing services where currently people only see functions and specializations is liberating and empowering. Service-orientation implies service delivery and therefore there must be customers for those services. It is this lens that enables the outside-in systems thinking approach to implementing Kanban that we cover in the Foundation level class curriculum from Lean Kanban University.


                That work flows through a series of information discovery activities is a concept borrowed from Lean Product Development. I first saw Don Reinertsen describe it in the early 1990s but he in turn credits the idea to Marvin Patterson. Michael Kennedy has also documented the same idea and I've tried to standardize on using Kennedy's language.


                I think many Lean consultants and many in the software development and IT space with an understanding of Lean (from manufacturing) miss the subtlety of this third concept - "work flows through a series of information discovery activities." It does not say, "work flows though a series of people with specialist skills." When mapping value streams, Lean people tell you to "follow the work." I think this is a red herring for knowledge work. Trying to map a complicated value creation network and then visualize it is a distraction. It gives you an overly complicated system and the many loops and joins in the network make visualization challenging. Following the work, through a series of people, also institutionalizes the handoffs between the people and masks important information about the activities performed by any one person in the chain. Since Agile Management over a decade ago, I've cautioned against this. We aren't interested in the passing of work between the people, we are interested in the dominant activity to discover new information at any given time in the workflow. This chain of activities tends to be much simpler and leads to significantly simpler and easier to comprehend visualization. Yes, the tickets on the board have to circulate if the process is iterative - so what? That is just a reflection of reality - design the kanban system accordingly.


                Viewing organizations through a Kanban Lens opens up new possibilities and enables us to set up extensive networks of interdependent kanban systems. Kanban scales in the enterprise by scaling out in a service-oriented fashion and it self-levels to optimize service delivery across a complex set of services, customers and their demands, through the use of a system of systems feedback loop. We call this system of systems feedback loop, the Operations Review.


                By adding the Kanban Lens to the literature and the teaching curriculum, we are helping people understand how to establish deep and extensive Kanban implementations that deliver significantly improved service delivery at enterprise scale. The Kanban Lens isn't new, it's just something that was hiding in plain sight and I was taking it for granted. By making it explicit I believe Kanban will be easier to teach and easier to adopt.







                --
              • Jeff Anderson
                I actually find what s hard to sell to some people is that you can get good value from people who have spent years practicing Kanban, a lot of people think
                Message 7 of 20 , Oct 19, 2013
                   I actually find what's hard to sell to some people is that you can get good value from people who have spent years practicing Kanban, a lot of people think it's just Sticky notes on the wall, which is so far from the truth. the whole ability to enable a service oriented organization for me is one of the big value points. But that seems to fly over some peoples have :-)


                  On Sat, Oct 19, 2013 at 5:55 PM, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:
                   

                  "Complex without being complicated" has a nice ring to it. It is both simple and complex but not complicated. Hence, it should be easy to comprehend and get started but many of the benefits are emergent and counter-intuitive. Hence, learning to trust it is based on experience and hearing stories from others than from deducing any particular outcome. This doesn't make it the easiest thing to "sell". ;-)

                  David
                  http://djaa.com/


                   



                  ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <Thomasjeffreyandersontwin@...> wrote:

                   the lean term does carry a lot of baggage with it, and always bumping into people who were trying to eliminate waste, reduce headcount etc. And call it lean,

                  Glad to see these ideas are coming out cleanly, the one interesting thing  I've always found about kanban is that it is complex  without being complicated. But the subtlety is surprising, and some people completely miss it. I know I still have to work at it :-)
                  Jeff


                  On Sat, Oct 19, 2013 at 11:22 AM, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:
                   

                  Thanks Jeff. It is amazing how it can take me a decade to discover how to communicate an idea cleanly and simply enough that people can receive it and comprehend it as intended. It's a continual learning loop for me. I truly hope that now we have something that will kick people into the realization this is a "different kind of Lean" we are talking about! And hence, why I'm de-emphasizing Lean as it just distracts people from what we are really trying to achieve - better management in knowledge worker industries.



                  ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <Thomasjeffreyandersontwin@...> wrote:

                  David,

                  I have always been super excited by the service oriented focus of kanban. The idea of iteratively of all a service oriented organization has always appealed to the architecture geek inside me. Plus I seen it actually works :-)

                  Your last point about information discovery activities is one of those eureka moments for me. I think I have been using it although not explicitly without realizing it.

                  Whenever I start  building a kanban system with clients, I "follow the work". This creates a crazy kanban system is basically unmanageable, too many columns, too many handoffs, too many cues.

                  What ends up happening next to create a dramatic simplification, based on the things that need to get done, based on work state, not on who does it.  I find your post incredibly helpful in articulating this thinking, next time around I think I'm going to start with this.

                  Very exciting stuff David!
                  Jeff



                  On Sat, Oct 19, 2013 at 12:34 AM, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:
                   

                  And this time with the blog URL
                  http://www.djaa.com/kanban-lens

                  :-/ sorry


                   



                  ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:

                  I just blogged this at...


                  But I thought I'd share the text in full on the list. The Kanban Lens is a new concept I've added to me public talks and we've incorporated into the Foundation level curriculum for certified classes from Lean Kanban University. Here is the blog text...

                  Regular readers who follow everything I post may already have spotted that I introduced a new way of thinking about Kanban. Like almost all of these "new" things, it isn't new at all. In fact, the concept existed in my first book, Agile Management, published over a decade ago. It took Andy Carmichael attending my coaching masterclass in Hamburg earlier this year to remind me of it. The Kanban Method is unpinned by the concept of "flow." Once again, something hiding in plain sight that I hadn't been thinking about or articulating clearly for a while.


                  So with my Paris and Utrecht, Lean Kanban Conference key notes, I re-introduced "flow" to the Kanban party. I used the term "Core Enabling Concepts" but we are likely to use the nickname "Kanban Lens" because they give us a way to see things - a way to see how an organization is currently structured and functioning and to then "kanbanize" that existing structure without reorganizing it. Sometimes, a different way to see is all it takes to reveal obviously conflicting policies and catalyze improvements.


                  The Kanban Lens

                  1. Service-orientation
                  2. Service delivery involves workflow
                  3. Work flows through a series of information discovery activities

                  Looking at a current organization through a service-oriented lens and seeing services where currently people only see functions and specializations is liberating and empowering. Service-orientation implies service delivery and therefore there must be customers for those services. It is this lens that enables the outside-in systems thinking approach to implementing Kanban that we cover in the Foundation level class curriculum from Lean Kanban University.


                  That work flows through a series of information discovery activities is a concept borrowed from Lean Product Development. I first saw Don Reinertsen describe it in the early 1990s but he in turn credits the idea to Marvin Patterson. Michael Kennedy has also documented the same idea and I've tried to standardize on using Kennedy's language.


                  I think many Lean consultants and many in the software development and IT space with an understanding of Lean (from manufacturing) miss the subtlety of this third concept - "work flows through a series of information discovery activities." It does not say, "work flows though a series of people with specialist skills." When mapping value streams, Lean people tell you to "follow the work." I think this is a red herring for knowledge work. Trying to map a complicated value creation network and then visualize it is a distraction. It gives you an overly complicated system and the many loops and joins in the network make visualization challenging. Following the work, through a series of people, also institutionalizes the handoffs between the people and masks important information about the activities performed by any one person in the chain. Since Agile Management over a decade ago, I've cautioned against this. We aren't interested in the passing of work between the people, we are interested in the dominant activity to discover new information at any given time in the workflow. This chain of activities tends to be much simpler and leads to significantly simpler and easier to comprehend visualization. Yes, the tickets on the board have to circulate if the process is iterative - so what? That is just a reflection of reality - design the kanban system accordingly.


                  Viewing organizations through a Kanban Lens opens up new possibilities and enables us to set up extensive networks of interdependent kanban systems. Kanban scales in the enterprise by scaling out in a service-oriented fashion and it self-levels to optimize service delivery across a complex set of services, customers and their demands, through the use of a system of systems feedback loop. We call this system of systems feedback loop, the Operations Review.


                  By adding the Kanban Lens to the literature and the teaching curriculum, we are helping people understand how to establish deep and extensive Kanban implementations that deliver significantly improved service delivery at enterprise scale. The Kanban Lens isn't new, it's just something that was hiding in plain sight and I was taking it for granted. By making it explicit I believe Kanban will be easier to teach and easier to adopt.







                  --




                  --
                • alexzheglov
                  Jeff, David (and other members) I was excited about the knowledge discovery process and mapping such processes for about two years, since David blogged about
                  Message 8 of 20 , Oct 20, 2013

                    Jeff, David (and other members)


                    I was excited about the knowledge discovery process and mapping such processes for about two years, since David blogged about it right after LKBE11.  I started using it in practice almost immediately and with good results.  Jeff, when you looked at some boards in my office during your short visit about a year ago, they were created by collaboratively mapping those information-producing dominant activities.


                    I often hear questions/stories from local kanban users who often change their board designs when they realize their new incoming work items doesn't really fit the workflow shown on the board.  They change their board, but soon enough another incoming work item upsets it.  Such board changes are not real improvements, just board maintenance.  This is not the case with the boards created using the knowledge discovery process mapping - those boards change with time too, but much more because of improvements in the process than due to fixing mistakes in mapping that process.


                    Another practical tip for mapping KDP and identifying dominant activities - bring in as many people as possible into the mapping exercise.  I've tried doing it with fewer people and that led to those people later dominating conversations in front of the board.  (And of course I started doing it differently afterwards.)


                    Service orientation also resonates very strongly with me.  The habits of matching backlog items with team members may be entrenched even on fairly Agile teams.  They can go through a lot of backlog items with good velocity, but it's easy for them to neglect what services they provide and to whom.  Then we can begin conversations and use the Kanban Lens to help them see their services and catalyze improvements or organizational refactorings.  This approach (developed by many members of this group) is so much more powerful than visualizing a team's process.


                    Thank you!

                    Alexei Zheglov



                    ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <kanbandev@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                     I actually find what's hard to sell to some people is that you can get good value from people who have spent years practicing Kanban, a lot of people think it's just Sticky notes on the wall, which is so far from the truth. the whole ability to enable a service oriented organization for me is one of the big value points. But that seems to fly over some peoples have :-)


                    On Sat, Oct 19, 2013 at 5:55 PM, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:
                     

                    "Complex without being complicated" has a nice ring to it. It is both simple and complex but not complicated. Hence, it should be easy to comprehend and get started but many of the benefits are emergent and counter-intuitive. Hence, learning to trust it is based on experience and hearing stories from others than from deducing any particular outcome. This doesn't make it the easiest thing to "sell". ;-)

                    David
                    http://djaa.com/


                     



                    ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <Thomasjeffreyandersontwin@...> wrote:

                     the lean term does carry a lot of baggage with it, and always bumping into people who were trying to eliminate waste, reduce headcount etc. And call it lean,

                    Glad to see these ideas are coming out cleanly, the one interesting thing  I've always found about kanban is that it is complex  without being complicated. But the subtlety is surprising, and some people completely miss it. I know I still have to work at it :-)
                    Jeff


                    On Sat, Oct 19, 2013 at 11:22 AM, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:
                     

                    Thanks Jeff. It is amazing how it can take me a decade to discover how to communicate an idea cleanly and simply enough that people can receive it and comprehend it as intended. It's a continual learning loop for me. I truly hope that now we have something that will kick people into the realization this is a "different kind of Lean" we are talking about! And hence, why I'm de-emphasizing Lean as it just distracts people from what we are really trying to achieve - better management in knowledge worker industries.



                    ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <Thomasjeffreyandersontwin@...> wrote:

                    David,

                    I have always been super excited by the service oriented focus of kanban. The idea of iteratively of all a service oriented organization has always appealed to the architecture geek inside me. Plus I seen it actually works :-)

                    Your last point about information discovery activities is one of those eureka moments for me. I think I have been using it although not explicitly without realizing it.

                    Whenever I start  building a kanban system with clients, I "follow the work". This creates a crazy kanban system is basically unmanageable, too many columns, too many handoffs, too many cues.

                    What ends up happening next to create a dramatic simplification, based on the things that need to get done, based on work state, not on who does it.  I find your post incredibly helpful in articulating this thinking, next time around I think I'm going to start with this.

                    Very exciting stuff David!
                    Jeff



                    On Sat, Oct 19, 2013 at 12:34 AM, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:
                     

                    And this time with the blog URL
                    http://www.djaa.com/kanban-lens

                    :-/ sorry


                     



                    ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:

                    I just blogged this at...


                    But I thought I'd share the text in full on the list. The Kanban Lens is a new concept I've added to me public talks and we've incorporated into the Foundation level curriculum for certified classes from Lean Kanban University. Here is the blog text...

                    Regular readers who follow everything I post may already have spotted that I introduced a new way of thinking about Kanban. Like almost all of these "new" things, it isn't new at all. In fact, the concept existed in my first book, Agile Management, published over a decade ago. It took Andy Carmichael attending my coaching masterclass in Hamburg earlier this year to remind me of it. The Kanban Method is unpinned by the concept of "flow." Once again, something hiding in plain sight that I hadn't been thinking about or articulating clearly for a while.


                    So with my Paris and Utrecht, Lean Kanban Conference key notes, I re-introduced "flow" to the Kanban party. I used the term "Core Enabling Concepts" but we are likely to use the nickname "Kanban Lens" because they give us a way to see things - a way to see how an organization is currently structured and functioning and to then "kanbanize" that existing structure without reorganizing it. Sometimes, a different way to see is all it takes to reveal obviously conflicting policies and catalyze improvements.


                    The Kanban Lens

                    1. Service-orientation
                    2. Service delivery involves workflow
                    3. Work flows through a series of information discovery activities

                    Looking at a current organization through a service-oriented lens and seeing services where currently people only see functions and specializations is liberating and empowering. Service-orientation implies service delivery and therefore there must be customers for those services. It is this lens that enables the outside-in systems thinking approach to implementing Kanban that we cover in the Foundation level class curriculum from Lean Kanban University.


                    That work flows through a series of information discovery activities is a concept borrowed from Lean Product Development. I first saw Don Reinertsen describe it in the early 1990s but he in turn credits the idea to Marvin Patterson. Michael Kennedy has also documented the same idea and I've tried to standardize on using Kennedy's language.


                    I think many Lean consultants and many in the software development and IT space with an understanding of Lean (from manufacturing) miss the subtlety of this third concept - "work flows through a series of information discovery activities." It does not say, "work flows though a series of people with specialist skills." When mapping value streams, Lean people tell you to "follow the work." I think this is a red herring for knowledge work. Trying to map a complicated value creation network and then visualize it is a distraction. It gives you an overly complicated system and the many loops and joins in the network make visualization challenging. Following the work, through a series of people, also institutionalizes the handoffs between the people and masks important information about the activities performed by any one person in the chain. Since Agile Management over a decade ago, I've cautioned against this. We aren't interested in the passing of work between the people, we are interested in the dominant activity to discover new information at any given time in the workflow. This chain of activities tends to be much simpler and leads to significantly simpler and easier to comprehend visualization. Yes, the tickets on the board have to circulate if the process is iterative - so what? That is just a reflection of reality - design the kanban system accordingly.


                    Viewing organizations through a Kanban Lens opens up new possibilities and enables us to set up extensive networks of interdependent kanban systems. Kanban scales in the enterprise by scaling out in a service-oriented fashion and it self-levels to optimize service delivery across a complex set of services, customers and their demands, through the use of a system of systems feedback loop. We call this system of systems feedback loop, the Operations Review.


                    By adding the Kanban Lens to the literature and the teaching curriculum, we are helping people understand how to establish deep and extensive Kanban implementations that deliver significantly improved service delivery at enterprise scale. The Kanban Lens isn't new, it's just something that was hiding in plain sight and I was taking it for granted. By making it explicit I believe Kanban will be easier to teach and easier to adopt.







                    --



                    --
                  • Jeff Anderson
                    very insightful alexi, I feel like I ve encountered something profound on this thread. One question I have is what you do when you have an organization that is
                    Message 9 of 20 , Oct 20, 2013
                       very insightful alexi,

                      I feel like I've encountered something profound on this thread.

                      One question I have is what you do when you have an organization that is structured according to highly specialized functional silos and work is passed off between departments  through the intervention of management? Do you have each department separately understand how they can provide services to each other?  Or would you try to restructure the organization to better support a service delivery model first?

                      Another question I would have is people's take on doing this for projects or programs versus maintenance or operations. in this instance a request could be "provide me an estimate" or it could be "build a web application", the latter being very hard to put a service delivery comes around being that it is both large, and highly variable in terms of how large it could be.



                      On Sun, Oct 20, 2013 at 5:41 PM, <alexzheglov@...> wrote:
                       

                      Jeff, David (and other members)


                      I was excited about the knowledge discovery process and mapping such processes for about two years, since David blogged about it right after LKBE11.  I started using it in practice almost immediately and with good results.  Jeff, when you looked at some boards in my office during your short visit about a year ago, they were created by collaboratively mapping those information-producing dominant activities.


                      I often hear questions/stories from local kanban users who often change their board designs when they realize their new incoming work items doesn't really fit the workflow shown on the board.  They change their board, but soon enough another incoming work item upsets it.  Such board changes are not real improvements, just board maintenance.  This is not the case with the boards created using the knowledge discovery process mapping - those boards change with time too, but much more because of improvements in the process than due to fixing mistakes in mapping that process.


                      Another practical tip for mapping KDP and identifying dominant activities - bring in as many people as possible into the mapping exercise.  I've tried doing it with fewer people and that led to those people later dominating conversations in front of the board.  (And of course I started doing it differently afterwards.)


                      Service orientation also resonates very strongly with me.  The habits of matching backlog items with team members may be entrenched even on fairly Agile teams.  They can go through a lot of backlog items with good velocity, but it's easy for them to neglect what services they provide and to whom.  Then we can begin conversations and use the Kanban Lens to help them see their services and catalyze improvements or organizational refactorings.  This approach (developed by many members of this group) is so much more powerful than visualizing a team's process.


                      Thank you!

                      Alexei Zheglov



                      ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <kanbandev@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                       I actually find what's hard to sell to some people is that you can get good value from people who have spent years practicing Kanban, a lot of people think it's just Sticky notes on the wall, which is so far from the truth. the whole ability to enable a service oriented organization for me is one of the big value points. But that seems to fly over some peoples have :-)


                      On Sat, Oct 19, 2013 at 5:55 PM, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:
                       

                      "Complex without being complicated" has a nice ring to it. It is both simple and complex but not complicated. Hence, it should be easy to comprehend and get started but many of the benefits are emergent and counter-intuitive. Hence, learning to trust it is based on experience and hearing stories from others than from deducing any particular outcome. This doesn't make it the easiest thing to "sell". ;-)

                      David
                      http://djaa.com/


                       



                      ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <Thomasjeffreyandersontwin@...> wrote:

                       the lean term does carry a lot of baggage with it, and always bumping into people who were trying to eliminate waste, reduce headcount etc. And call it lean,

                      Glad to see these ideas are coming out cleanly, the one interesting thing  I've always found about kanban is that it is complex  without being complicated. But the subtlety is surprising, and some people completely miss it. I know I still have to work at it :-)
                      Jeff


                      On Sat, Oct 19, 2013 at 11:22 AM, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:
                       

                      Thanks Jeff. It is amazing how it can take me a decade to discover how to communicate an idea cleanly and simply enough that people can receive it and comprehend it as intended. It's a continual learning loop for me. I truly hope that now we have something that will kick people into the realization this is a "different kind of Lean" we are talking about! And hence, why I'm de-emphasizing Lean as it just distracts people from what we are really trying to achieve - better management in knowledge worker industries.



                      ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <Thomasjeffreyandersontwin@...> wrote:

                      David,

                      I have always been super excited by the service oriented focus of kanban. The idea of iteratively of all a service oriented organization has always appealed to the architecture geek inside me. Plus I seen it actually works :-)

                      Your last point about information discovery activities is one of those eureka moments for me. I think I have been using it although not explicitly without realizing it.

                      Whenever I start  building a kanban system with clients, I "follow the work". This creates a crazy kanban system is basically unmanageable, too many columns, too many handoffs, too many cues.

                      What ends up happening next to create a dramatic simplification, based on the things that need to get done, based on work state, not on who does it.  I find your post incredibly helpful in articulating this thinking, next time around I think I'm going to start with this.

                      Very exciting stuff David!
                      Jeff



                      On Sat, Oct 19, 2013 at 12:34 AM, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:
                       

                      And this time with the blog URL
                      http://www.djaa.com/kanban-lens

                      :-/ sorry


                       



                      ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:

                      I just blogged this at...


                      But I thought I'd share the text in full on the list. The Kanban Lens is a new concept I've added to me public talks and we've incorporated into the Foundation level curriculum for certified classes from Lean Kanban University. Here is the blog text...

                      Regular readers who follow everything I post may already have spotted that I introduced a new way of thinking about Kanban. Like almost all of these "new" things, it isn't new at all. In fact, the concept existed in my first book, Agile Management, published over a decade ago. It took Andy Carmichael attending my coaching masterclass in Hamburg earlier this year to remind me of it. The Kanban Method is unpinned by the concept of "flow." Once again, something hiding in plain sight that I hadn't been thinking about or articulating clearly for a while.


                      So with my Paris and Utrecht, Lean Kanban Conference key notes, I re-introduced "flow" to the Kanban party. I used the term "Core Enabling Concepts" but we are likely to use the nickname "Kanban Lens" because they give us a way to see things - a way to see how an organization is currently structured and functioning and to then "kanbanize" that existing structure without reorganizing it. Sometimes, a different way to see is all it takes to reveal obviously conflicting policies and catalyze improvements.


                      The Kanban Lens

                      1. Service-orientation
                      2. Service delivery involves workflow
                      3. Work flows through a series of information discovery activities

                      Looking at a current organization through a service-oriented lens and seeing services where currently people only see functions and specializations is liberating and empowering. Service-orientation implies service delivery and therefore there must be customers for those services. It is this lens that enables the outside-in systems thinking approach to implementing Kanban that we cover in the Foundation level class curriculum from Lean Kanban University.


                      That work flows through a series of information discovery activities is a concept borrowed from Lean Product Development. I first saw Don Reinertsen describe it in the early 1990s but he in turn credits the idea to Marvin Patterson. Michael Kennedy has also documented the same idea and I've tried to standardize on using Kennedy's language.


                      I think many Lean consultants and many in the software development and IT space with an understanding of Lean (from manufacturing) miss the subtlety of this third concept - "work flows through a series of information discovery activities." It does not say, "work flows though a series of people with specialist skills." When mapping value streams, Lean people tell you to "follow the work." I think this is a red herring for knowledge work. Trying to map a complicated value creation network and then visualize it is a distraction. It gives you an overly complicated system and the many loops and joins in the network make visualization challenging. Following the work, through a series of people, also institutionalizes the handoffs between the people and masks important information about the activities performed by any one person in the chain. Since Agile Management over a decade ago, I've cautioned against this. We aren't interested in the passing of work between the people, we are interested in the dominant activity to discover new information at any given time in the workflow. This chain of activities tends to be much simpler and leads to significantly simpler and easier to comprehend visualization. Yes, the tickets on the board have to circulate if the process is iterative - so what? That is just a reflection of reality - design the kanban system accordingly.


                      Viewing organizations through a Kanban Lens opens up new possibilities and enables us to set up extensive networks of interdependent kanban systems. Kanban scales in the enterprise by scaling out in a service-oriented fashion and it self-levels to optimize service delivery across a complex set of services, customers and their demands, through the use of a system of systems feedback loop. We call this system of systems feedback loop, the Operations Review.


                      By adding the Kanban Lens to the literature and the teaching curriculum, we are helping people understand how to establish deep and extensive Kanban implementations that deliver significantly improved service delivery at enterprise scale. The Kanban Lens isn't new, it's just something that was hiding in plain sight and I was taking it for granted. By making it explicit I believe Kanban will be easier to teach and easier to adopt.







                      --
                    • alexzheglov
                      Jeff, on your first question, it probably depends on the organization, but speaking for the company where I work, the latter - restructuring (and retraining)
                      Message 10 of 20 , Oct 20, 2013

                        Jeff,


                        on your first question, it probably depends on the organization, but speaking for the company where I work, the latter - restructuring (and retraining) is clearly outside the tolerances.  At the same time, the former - refactoring helped by understanding the services - has actually been proven to work.  We've recently had a case like that.  The important part of it was that it came from the people and quickly gained acceptance, not via a management edict or as a change designed by a process consultant.  My role was to help them see the services and engage their customers.  I chose not to go along with the expectations of some people from the original team, when they first contacted me for help, to set them up with a flashy board and an iterationless process.


                        If we had every department interdependently and competently seek their own capability-demand balance using kanban systems, I guess we'd probably see such refactorings and other improvements more often.


                        On your second question, we have a department that does billable work and uses the two-service model like you described.


                        Alexei Zheglov



                        ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <kanbandev@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                         very insightful alexi,

                        I feel like I've encountered something profound on this thread.

                        One question I have is what you do when you have an organization that is structured according to highly specialized functional silos and work is passed off between departments  through the intervention of management? Do you have each department separately understand how they can provide services to each other?  Or would you try to restructure the organization to better support a service delivery model first?

                        Another question I would have is people's take on doing this for projects or programs versus maintenance or operations. in this instance a request could be "provide me an estimate" or it could be "build a web application", the latter being very hard to put a service delivery comes around being that it is both large, and highly variable in terms of how large it could be.



                        On Sun, Oct 20, 2013 at 5:41 PM, <alexzheglov@...> wrote:
                         

                        Jeff, David (and other members)


                        I was excited about the knowledge discovery process and mapping such processes for about two years, since David blogged about it right after LKBE11.  I started using it in practice almost immediately and with good results.  Jeff, when you looked at some boards in my office during your short visit about a year ago, they were created by collaboratively mapping those information-producing dominant activities.


                        I often hear questions/stories from local kanban users who often change their board designs when they realize their new incoming work items doesn't really fit the workflow shown on the board.  They change their board, but soon enough another incoming work item upsets it.  Such board changes are not real improvements, just board maintenance.  This is not the case with the boards created using the knowledge discovery process mapping - those boards change with time too, but much more because of improvements in the process than due to fixing mistakes in mapping that process.


                        Another practical tip for mapping KDP and identifying dominant activities - bring in as many people as possible into the mapping exercise.  I've tried doing it with fewer people and that led to those people later dominating conversations in front of the board.  (And of course I started doing it differently afterwards.)


                        Service orientation also resonates very strongly with me.  The habits of matching backlog items with team members may be entrenched even on fairly Agile teams.  They can go through a lot of backlog items with good velocity, but it's easy for them to neglect what services they provide and to whom.  Then we can begin conversations and use the Kanban Lens to help them see their services and catalyze improvements or organizational refactorings.  This approach (developed by many members of this group) is so much more powerful than visualizing a team's process.


                        Thank you!

                        Alexei Zheglov



                        ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <kanbandev@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                         I actually find what's hard to sell to some people is that you can get good value from people who have spent years practicing Kanban, a lot of people think it's just Sticky notes on the wall, which is so far from the truth. the whole ability to enable a service oriented organization for me is one of the big value points. But that seems to fly over some peoples have :-)


                        On Sat, Oct 19, 2013 at 5:55 PM, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:
                         

                        "Complex without being complicated" has a nice ring to it. It is both simple and complex but not complicated. Hence, it should be easy to comprehend and get started but many of the benefits are emergent and counter-intuitive. Hence, learning to trust it is based on experience and hearing stories from others than from deducing any particular outcome. This doesn't make it the easiest thing to "sell". ;-)

                        David
                        http://djaa.com/


                         



                        ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <Thomasjeffreyandersontwin@...> wrote:

                         the lean term does carry a lot of baggage with it, and always bumping into people who were trying to eliminate waste, reduce headcount etc. And call it lean,

                        Glad to see these ideas are coming out cleanly, the one interesting thing  I've always found about kanban is that it is complex  without being complicated. But the subtlety is surprising, and some people completely miss it. I know I still have to work at it :-)
                        Jeff


                        On Sat, Oct 19, 2013 at 11:22 AM, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:
                         

                        Thanks Jeff. It is amazing how it can take me a decade to discover how to communicate an idea cleanly and simply enough that people can receive it and comprehend it as intended. It's a continual learning loop for me. I truly hope that now we have something that will kick people into the realization this is a "different kind of Lean" we are talking about! And hence, why I'm de-emphasizing Lean as it just distracts people from what we are really trying to achieve - better management in knowledge worker industries.



                        ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <Thomasjeffreyandersontwin@...> wrote:

                        David,

                        I have always been super excited by the service oriented focus of kanban. The idea of iteratively of all a service oriented organization has always appealed to the architecture geek inside me. Plus I seen it actually works :-)

                        Your last point about information discovery activities is one of those eureka moments for me. I think I have been using it although not explicitly without realizing it.

                        Whenever I start  building a kanban system with clients, I "follow the work". This creates a crazy kanban system is basically unmanageable, too many columns, too many handoffs, too many cues.

                        What ends up happening next to create a dramatic simplification, based on the things that need to get done, based on work state, not on who does it.  I find your post incredibly helpful in articulating this thinking, next time around I think I'm going to start with this.

                        Very exciting stuff David!
                        Jeff



                        On Sat, Oct 19, 2013 at 12:34 AM, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:
                         

                        And this time with the blog URL
                        http://www.djaa.com/kanban-lens

                        :-/ sorry


                         



                        ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:

                        I just blogged this at...


                        But I thought I'd share the text in full on the list. The Kanban Lens is a new concept I've added to me public talks and we've incorporated into the Foundation level curriculum for certified classes from Lean Kanban University. Here is the blog text...

                        Regular readers who follow everything I post may already have spotted that I introduced a new way of thinking about Kanban. Like almost all of these "new" things, it isn't new at all. In fact, the concept existed in my first book, Agile Management, published over a decade ago. It took Andy Carmichael attending my coaching masterclass in Hamburg earlier this year to remind me of it. The Kanban Method is unpinned by the concept of "flow." Once again, something hiding in plain sight that I hadn't been thinking about or articulating clearly for a while.


                        So with my Paris and Utrecht, Lean Kanban Conference key notes, I re-introduced "flow" to the Kanban party. I used the term "Core Enabling Concepts" but we are likely to use the nickname "Kanban Lens" because they give us a way to see things - a way to see how an organization is currently structured and functioning and to then "kanbanize" that existing structure without reorganizing it. Sometimes, a different way to see is all it takes to reveal obviously conflicting policies and catalyze improvements.


                        The Kanban Lens

                        1. Service-orientation
                        2. Service delivery involves workflow
                        3. Work flows through a series of information discovery activities

                        Looking at a current organization through a service-oriented lens and seeing services where currently people only see functions and specializations is liberating and empowering. Service-orientation implies service delivery and therefore there must be customers for those services. It is this lens that enables the outside-in systems thinking approach to implementing Kanban that we cover in the Foundation level class curriculum from Lean Kanban University.


                        That work flows through a series of information discovery activities is a concept borrowed from Lean Product Development. I first saw Don Reinertsen describe it in the early 1990s but he in turn credits the idea to Marvin Patterson. Michael Kennedy has also documented the same idea and I've tried to standardize on using Kennedy's language.


                        I think many Lean consultants and many in the software development and IT space with an understanding of Lean (from manufacturing) miss the subtlety of this third concept - "work flows through a series of information discovery activities." It does not say, "work flows though a series of people with specialist skills." When mapping value streams, Lean people tell you to "follow the work." I think this is a red herring for knowledge work. Trying to map a complicated value creation network and then visualize it is a distraction. It gives you an overly complicated system and the many loops and joins in the network make visualization challenging. Following the work, through a series of people, also institutionalizes the handoffs between the people and masks important information about the activities performed by any one person in the chain. Since Agile Management over a decade ago, I've cautioned against this. We aren't interested in the passing of work between the people, we are interested in the dominant activity to discover new information at any given time in the workflow. This chain of activities tends to be much simpler and leads to significantly simpler and easier to comprehend visualization. Yes, the tickets on the board have to circulate if the process is iterative - so what? That is just a reflection of reality - design the kanban system accordingly.


                        Viewing organizations through a Kanban Lens opens up new possibilities and enables us to set up extensive networks of interdependent kanban systems. Kanban scales in the enterprise by scaling out in a service-oriented fashion and it self-levels to optimize service delivery across a complex set of services, customers and their demands, through the use of a system of systems feedback loop. We call this system of systems feedback loop, the Operations Review.


                        By adding the Kanban Lens to the literature and the teaching curriculum, we are helping people understand how to establish deep and extensive Kanban implementations that deliver significantly improved service delivery at enterprise scale. The Kanban Lens isn't new, it's just something that was hiding in plain sight and I was taking it for granted. By making it explicit I believe Kanban will be easier to teach and easier to adopt.







                        --
                      • Karl Scotland
                        Hi David, I like this. For me it fills a hole in the Kanban Method, which is what would be a desirable disposition for a kanban system evolution? It seems to
                        Message 11 of 20 , Oct 21, 2013
                          Hi David,

                          I like this. For me it fills a hole in the Kanban Method, which is "what would be a desirable disposition for a kanban system evolution?" It seems to align with why I like to talk about system impact. In particular, the service-orientation is a link to Value, and the knowledge discovery process is a link to Flow.

                          I'm wondering about the wording of 3 and whether it could include a reference to the human nature of the knowledge discovery? Or is that implicit?

                          Karl


                          On 19 October 2013 05:28, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:


                          I just blogged this at...


                          But I thought I'd share the text in full on the list. The Kanban Lens is a new concept I've added to me public talks and we've incorporated into the Foundation level curriculum for certified classes from Lean Kanban University. Here is the blog text...

                          Regular readers who follow everything I post may already have spotted that I introduced a new way of thinking about Kanban. Like almost all of these "new" things, it isn't new at all. In fact, the concept existed in my first book, Agile Management, published over a decade ago. It took Andy Carmichael attending my coaching masterclass in Hamburg earlier this year to remind me of it. The Kanban Method is unpinned by the concept of "flow." Once again, something hiding in plain sight that I hadn't been thinking about or articulating clearly for a while.


                          So with my Paris and Utrecht, Lean Kanban Conference key notes, I re-introduced "flow" to the Kanban party. I used the term "Core Enabling Concepts" but we are likely to use the nickname "Kanban Lens" because they give us a way to see things - a way to see how an organization is currently structured and functioning and to then "kanbanize" that existing structure without reorganizing it. Sometimes, a different way to see is all it takes to reveal obviously conflicting policies and catalyze improvements.


                          The Kanban Lens

                          1. Service-orientation
                          2. Service delivery involves workflow
                          3. Work flows through a series of information discovery activities

                          Looking at a current organization through a service-oriented lens and seeing services where currently people only see functions and specializations is liberating and empowering. Service-orientation implies service delivery and therefore there must be customers for those services. It is this lens that enables the outside-in systems thinking approach to implementing Kanban that we cover in the Foundation level class curriculum from Lean Kanban University.


                          That work flows through a series of information discovery activities is a concept borrowed from Lean Product Development. I first saw Don Reinertsen describe it in the early 1990s but he in turn credits the idea to Marvin Patterson. Michael Kennedy has also documented the same idea and I've tried to standardize on using Kennedy's language.


                          I think many Lean consultants and many in the software development and IT space with an understanding of Lean (from manufacturing) miss the subtlety of this third concept - "work flows through a series of information discovery activities." It does not say, "work flows though a series of people with specialist skills." When mapping value streams, Lean people tell you to "follow the work." I think this is a red herring for knowledge work. Trying to map a complicated value creation network and then visualize it is a distraction. It gives you an overly complicated system and the many loops and joins in the network make visualization challenging. Following the work, through a series of people, also institutionalizes the handoffs between the people and masks important information about the activities performed by any one person in the chain. Since Agile Management over a decade ago, I've cautioned against this. We aren't interested in the passing of work between the people, we are interested in the dominant activity to discover new information at any given time in the workflow. This chain of activities tends to be much simpler and leads to significantly simpler and easier to comprehend visualization. Yes, the tickets on the board have to circulate if the process is iterative - so what? That is just a reflection of reality - design the kanban system accordingly.


                          Viewing organizations through a Kanban Lens opens up new possibilities and enables us to set up extensive networks of interdependent kanban systems. Kanban scales in the enterprise by scaling out in a service-oriented fashion and it self-levels to optimize service delivery across a complex set of services, customers and their demands, through the use of a system of systems feedback loop. We call this system of systems feedback loop, the Operations Review.


                          By adding the Kanban Lens to the literature and the teaching curriculum, we are helping people understand how to establish deep and extensive Kanban implementations that deliver significantly improved service delivery at enterprise scale. The Kanban Lens isn't new, it's just something that was hiding in plain sight and I was taking it for granted. By making it explicit I believe Kanban will be easier to teach and easier to adopt.






                          --
                          Karl Scotland
                          Lean & Agile Coach
                          http://www.availagility.co.uk/
                        • netherby_uk
                          Hi Karl, I hope we don t have to encumber the definition with Work flows through a series of knowledge discovery activities performed by humans but I do take
                          Message 12 of 20 , Oct 22, 2013

                            Hi Karl,


                            I hope we don't have to encumber the definition with


                            Work flows through a series of knowledge discovery activities "performed by humans"


                            but I do take your point that the wording on 3 could probably be sharpened up


                            David

                            http://djaa.com/



                            ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <kanbandev@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                            Hi David,

                            I like this. For me it fills a hole in the Kanban Method, which is "what would be a desirable disposition for a kanban system evolution?" It seems to align with why I like to talk about system impact. In particular, the service-orientation is a link to Value, and the knowledge discovery process is a link to Flow.

                            I'm wondering about the wording of 3 and whether it could include a reference to the human nature of the knowledge discovery? Or is that implicit?

                            Karl


                            On 19 October 2013 05:28, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:


                            I just blogged this at...


                            But I thought I'd share the text in full on the list. The Kanban Lens is a new concept I've added to me public talks and we've incorporated into the Foundation level curriculum for certified classes from Lean Kanban University. Here is the blog text...

                            Regular readers who follow everything I post may already have spotted that I introduced a new way of thinking about Kanban. Like almost all of these "new" things, it isn't new at all. In fact, the concept existed in my first book, Agile Management, published over a decade ago. It took Andy Carmichael attending my coaching masterclass in Hamburg earlier this year to remind me of it. The Kanban Method is unpinned by the concept of "flow." Once again, something hiding in plain sight that I hadn't been thinking about or articulating clearly for a while.


                            So with my Paris and Utrecht, Lean Kanban Conference key notes, I re-introduced "flow" to the Kanban party. I used the term "Core Enabling Concepts" but we are likely to use the nickname "Kanban Lens" because they give us a way to see things - a way to see how an organization is currently structured and functioning and to then "kanbanize" that existing structure without reorganizing it. Sometimes, a different way to see is all it takes to reveal obviously conflicting policies and catalyze improvements.


                            The Kanban Lens

                            1. Service-orientation
                            2. Service delivery involves workflow
                            3. Work flows through a series of information discovery activities

                            Looking at a current organization through a service-oriented lens and seeing services where currently people only see functions and specializations is liberating and empowering. Service-orientation implies service delivery and therefore there must be customers for those services. It is this lens that enables the outside-in systems thinking approach to implementing Kanban that we cover in the Foundation level class curriculum from Lean Kanban University.


                            That work flows through a series of information discovery activities is a concept borrowed from Lean Product Development. I first saw Don Reinertsen describe it in the early 1990s but he in turn credits the idea to Marvin Patterson. Michael Kennedy has also documented the same idea and I've tried to standardize on using Kennedy's language.


                            I think many Lean consultants and many in the software development and IT space with an understanding of Lean (from manufacturing) miss the subtlety of this third concept - "work flows through a series of information discovery activities." It does not say, "work flows though a series of people with specialist skills." When mapping value streams, Lean people tell you to "follow the work." I think this is a red herring for knowledge work. Trying to map a complicated value creation network and then visualize it is a distraction. It gives you an overly complicated system and the many loops and joins in the network make visualization challenging. Following the work, through a series of people, also institutionalizes the handoffs between the people and masks important information about the activities performed by any one person in the chain. Since Agile Management over a decade ago, I've cautioned against this. We aren't interested in the passing of work between the people, we are interested in the dominant activity to discover new information at any given time in the workflow. This chain of activities tends to be much simpler and leads to significantly simpler and easier to comprehend visualization. Yes, the tickets on the board have to circulate if the process is iterative - so what? That is just a reflection of reality - design the kanban system accordingly.


                            Viewing organizations through a Kanban Lens opens up new possibilities and enables us to set up extensive networks of interdependent kanban systems. Kanban scales in the enterprise by scaling out in a service-oriented fashion and it self-levels to optimize service delivery across a complex set of services, customers and their demands, through the use of a system of systems feedback loop. We call this system of systems feedback loop, the Operations Review.


                            By adding the Kanban Lens to the literature and the teaching curriculum, we are helping people understand how to establish deep and extensive Kanban implementations that deliver significantly improved service delivery at enterprise scale. The Kanban Lens isn't new, it's just something that was hiding in plain sight and I was taking it for granted. By making it explicit I believe Kanban will be easier to teach and easier to adopt.






                            --
                            Karl Scotland
                            Lean & Agile Coach
                            http://www.availagility.co.uk/
                          • netherby_uk
                            very insightful, Alexei! :-) Thanks for sharing your experience on this. ... Jeff, David (and other members) I was excited about the knowledge discovery
                            Message 13 of 20 , Oct 22, 2013
                              very insightful, Alexei! :-) Thanks for sharing your experience on this.

                               



                              ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <kanbandev@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                              Jeff, David (and other members)


                              I was excited about the knowledge discovery process and mapping such processes for about two years, since David blogged about it right after LKBE11.  I started using it in practice almost immediately and with good results.  Jeff, when you looked at some boards in my office during your short visit about a year ago, they were created by collaboratively mapping those information-producing dominant activities.


                              I often hear questions/stories from local kanban users who often change their board designs when they realize their new incoming work items doesn't really fit the workflow shown on the board.  They change their board, but soon enough another incoming work item upsets it.  Such board changes are not real improvements, just board maintenance.  This is not the case with the boards created using the knowledge discovery process mapping - those boards change with time too, but much more because of improvements in the process than due to fixing mistakes in mapping that process.


                              Another practical tip for mapping KDP and identifying dominant activities - bring in as many people as possible into the mapping exercise.  I've tried doing it with fewer people and that led to those people later dominating conversations in front of the board.  (And of course I started doing it differently afterwards.)


                              Service orientation also resonates very strongly with me.  The habits of matching backlog items with team members may be entrenched even on fairly Agile teams.  They can go through a lot of backlog items with good velocity, but it's easy for them to neglect what services they provide and to whom.  Then we can begin conversations and use the Kanban Lens to help them see their services and catalyze improvements or organizational refactorings.  This approach (developed by many members of this group) is so much more powerful than visualizing a team's process.


                              Thank you!

                              Alexei Zheglov



                              ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <kanbandev@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                               I actually find what's hard to sell to some people is that you can get good value from people who have spent years practicing Kanban, a lot of people think it's just Sticky notes on the wall, which is so far from the truth. the whole ability to enable a service oriented organization for me is one of the big value points. But that seems to fly over some peoples have :-)


                              On Sat, Oct 19, 2013 at 5:55 PM, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:
                               

                              "Complex without being complicated" has a nice ring to it. It is both simple and complex but not complicated. Hence, it should be easy to comprehend and get started but many of the benefits are emergent and counter-intuitive. Hence, learning to trust it is based on experience and hearing stories from others than from deducing any particular outcome. This doesn't make it the easiest thing to "sell". ;-)

                              David
                              http://djaa.com/


                               



                              ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <Thomasjeffreyandersontwin@...> wrote:

                               the lean term does carry a lot of baggage with it, and always bumping into people who were trying to eliminate waste, reduce headcount etc. And call it lean,

                              Glad to see these ideas are coming out cleanly, the one interesting thing  I've always found about kanban is that it is complex  without being complicated. But the subtlety is surprising, and some people completely miss it. I know I still have to work at it :-)
                              Jeff


                              On Sat, Oct 19, 2013 at 11:22 AM, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:
                               

                              Thanks Jeff. It is amazing how it can take me a decade to discover how to communicate an idea cleanly and simply enough that people can receive it and comprehend it as intended. It's a continual learning loop for me. I truly hope that now we have something that will kick people into the realization this is a "different kind of Lean" we are talking about! And hence, why I'm de-emphasizing Lean as it just distracts people from what we are really trying to achieve - better management in knowledge worker industries.



                              ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <Thomasjeffreyandersontwin@...> wrote:

                              David,

                              I have always been super excited by the service oriented focus of kanban. The idea of iteratively of all a service oriented organization has always appealed to the architecture geek inside me. Plus I seen it actually works :-)

                              Your last point about information discovery activities is one of those eureka moments for me. I think I have been using it although not explicitly without realizing it.

                              Whenever I start  building a kanban system with clients, I "follow the work". This creates a crazy kanban system is basically unmanageable, too many columns, too many handoffs, too many cues.

                              What ends up happening next to create a dramatic simplification, based on the things that need to get done, based on work state, not on who does it.  I find your post incredibly helpful in articulating this thinking, next time around I think I'm going to start with this.

                              Very exciting stuff David!
                              Jeff



                              On Sat, Oct 19, 2013 at 12:34 AM, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:
                               

                              And this time with the blog URL
                              http://www.djaa.com/kanban-lens

                              :-/ sorry


                               



                              ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:

                              I just blogged this at...


                              But I thought I'd share the text in full on the list. The Kanban Lens is a new concept I've added to me public talks and we've incorporated into the Foundation level curriculum for certified classes from Lean Kanban University. Here is the blog text...

                              Regular readers who follow everything I post may already have spotted that I introduced a new way of thinking about Kanban. Like almost all of these "new" things, it isn't new at all. In fact, the concept existed in my first book, Agile Management, published over a decade ago. It took Andy Carmichael attending my coaching masterclass in Hamburg earlier this year to remind me of it. The Kanban Method is unpinned by the concept of "flow." Once again, something hiding in plain sight that I hadn't been thinking about or articulating clearly for a while.


                              So with my Paris and Utrecht, Lean Kanban Conference key notes, I re-introduced "flow" to the Kanban party. I used the term "Core Enabling Concepts" but we are likely to use the nickname "Kanban Lens" because they give us a way to see things - a way to see how an organization is currently structured and functioning and to then "kanbanize" that existing structure without reorganizing it. Sometimes, a different way to see is all it takes to reveal obviously conflicting policies and catalyze improvements.


                              The Kanban Lens

                              1. Service-orientation
                              2. Service delivery involves workflow
                              3. Work flows through a series of information discovery activities

                              Looking at a current organization through a service-oriented lens and seeing services where currently people only see functions and specializations is liberating and empowering. Service-orientation implies service delivery and therefore there must be customers for those services. It is this lens that enables the outside-in systems thinking approach to implementing Kanban that we cover in the Foundation level class curriculum from Lean Kanban University.


                              That work flows through a series of information discovery activities is a concept borrowed from Lean Product Development. I first saw Don Reinertsen describe it in the early 1990s but he in turn credits the idea to Marvin Patterson. Michael Kennedy has also documented the same idea and I've tried to standardize on using Kennedy's language.


                              I think many Lean consultants and many in the software development and IT space with an understanding of Lean (from manufacturing) miss the subtlety of this third concept - "work flows through a series of information discovery activities." It does not say, "work flows though a series of people with specialist skills." When mapping value streams, Lean people tell you to "follow the work." I think this is a red herring for knowledge work. Trying to map a complicated value creation network and then visualize it is a distraction. It gives you an overly complicated system and the many loops and joins in the network make visualization challenging. Following the work, through a series of people, also institutionalizes the handoffs between the people and masks important information about the activities performed by any one person in the chain. Since Agile Management over a decade ago, I've cautioned against this. We aren't interested in the passing of work between the people, we are interested in the dominant activity to discover new information at any given time in the workflow. This chain of activities tends to be much simpler and leads to significantly simpler and easier to comprehend visualization. Yes, the tickets on the board have to circulate if the process is iterative - so what? That is just a reflection of reality - design the kanban system accordingly.


                              Viewing organizations through a Kanban Lens opens up new possibilities and enables us to set up extensive networks of interdependent kanban systems. Kanban scales in the enterprise by scaling out in a service-oriented fashion and it self-levels to optimize service delivery across a complex set of services, customers and their demands, through the use of a system of systems feedback loop. We call this system of systems feedback loop, the Operations Review.


                              By adding the Kanban Lens to the literature and the teaching curriculum, we are helping people understand how to establish deep and extensive Kanban implementations that deliver significantly improved service delivery at enterprise scale. The Kanban Lens isn't new, it's just something that was hiding in plain sight and I was taking it for granted. By making it explicit I believe Kanban will be easier to teach and easier to adopt.







                              --



                              --
                            • Doug Shelton
                              Why do you object to Karl s statement Work flows through a series of knowledge discovery activities performed by humans ?? *R. Douglas Doug Shelton, PMP,
                              Message 14 of 20 , Oct 22, 2013
                                Why do you object to Karl's statement "Work flows through a series of knowledge discovery activities "performed by humans"??


                                R. Douglas "Doug" Shelton, PMP, CSM, SPC, ICP-AC, ICP-TF, ITILv3

                                eMail: rdougshelton@...

                                Yahoo IM: dshelton94501

                                Gtalk/Skype: rdougshelton

                                Linked-In URL: http://www.linkedin.com/in/rdouglasshelton



                              • Mike Burrows
                                Hi Karl, If you accept my values model (which I map directly to canonical descriptions of the method), there is no disposition hole to be filled. The values
                                Message 15 of 20 , Oct 23, 2013
                                  Hi Karl,

                                  If you accept my values model (which I map directly to canonical descriptions of the method), there is no "disposition" hole to be filled. The values represent not just what the Kanban method brings, but what we hope to develop over time. Moreover, three of the values - namely customer focus, flow and leadership - are very much about direction (and very well aligned to the renewed emphasis on service orientation and service delivery).

                                  But I digress...

                                  I thnk the crucial point that may be getting missed is that we're talking about a way of looking at things that
                                  1. is about both process and organisation, and
                                  2. may represent a radical departure from current thinking
                                  Even where the concepts don't seem so radical, many of us here know that the effect on the quality and performance of service delivery can be dramatic. It's a paradox that has been observed here before: how is it that the "start with what you do now" method often seem introduce such immediate change?

                                  The big challenge for us here (and to me as much as anyone) is that our emphasis on evolution, continuous improvement, direction, disposition etc may be hiding something really valuable from those who might have the most to benefit from Kanban but aren't seeing that it is likely to meet their needs. We need to fix that.

                                  Watch out for a blog post today or tomorrow. Meanwhile, if you're curious about how to turn the "process of knowledge discovery" concept into action, you may enjoy this one from a few weeks ago: http://positiveincline.com/index.php/2013/09/stand-up-meeting-thinking-tool-leadership-routine/

                                  Regards,
                                  Mike



                                  On 21 October 2013 10:10, Karl Scotland <kjscotland@...> wrote:
                                   

                                  Hi David,

                                  I like this. For me it fills a hole in the Kanban Method, which is "what would be a desirable disposition for a kanban system evolution?" It seems to align with why I like to talk about system impact. In particular, the service-orientation is a link to Value, and the knowledge discovery process is a link to Flow.

                                  I'm wondering about the wording of 3 and whether it could include a reference to the human nature of the knowledge discovery? Or is that implicit?

                                  Karl


                                  On 19 October 2013 05:28, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:


                                  I just blogged this at...


                                  But I thought I'd share the text in full on the list. The Kanban Lens is a new concept I've added to me public talks and we've incorporated into the Foundation level curriculum for certified classes from Lean Kanban University. Here is the blog text...

                                  Regular readers who follow everything I post may already have spotted that I introduced a new way of thinking about Kanban. Like almost all of these "new" things, it isn't new at all. In fact, the concept existed in my first book, Agile Management, published over a decade ago. It took Andy Carmichael attending my coaching masterclass in Hamburg earlier this year to remind me of it. The Kanban Method is unpinned by the concept of "flow." Once again, something hiding in plain sight that I hadn't been thinking about or articulating clearly for a while.


                                  So with my Paris and Utrecht, Lean Kanban Conference key notes, I re-introduced "flow" to the Kanban party. I used the term "Core Enabling Concepts" but we are likely to use the nickname "Kanban Lens" because they give us a way to see things - a way to see how an organization is currently structured and functioning and to then "kanbanize" that existing structure without reorganizing it. Sometimes, a different way to see is all it takes to reveal obviously conflicting policies and catalyze improvements.


                                  The Kanban Lens

                                  1. Service-orientation
                                  2. Service delivery involves workflow
                                  3. Work flows through a series of information discovery activities

                                  Looking at a current organization through a service-oriented lens and seeing services where currently people only see functions and specializations is liberating and empowering. Service-orientation implies service delivery and therefore there must be customers for those services. It is this lens that enables the outside-in systems thinking approach to implementing Kanban that we cover in the Foundation level class curriculum from Lean Kanban University.


                                  That work flows through a series of information discovery activities is a concept borrowed from Lean Product Development. I first saw Don Reinertsen describe it in the early 1990s but he in turn credits the idea to Marvin Patterson. Michael Kennedy has also documented the same idea and I've tried to standardize on using Kennedy's language.


                                  I think many Lean consultants and many in the software development and IT space with an understanding of Lean (from manufacturing) miss the subtlety of this third concept - "work flows through a series of information discovery activities." It does not say, "work flows though a series of people with specialist skills." When mapping value streams, Lean people tell you to "follow the work." I think this is a red herring for knowledge work. Trying to map a complicated value creation network and then visualize it is a distraction. It gives you an overly complicated system and the many loops and joins in the network make visualization challenging. Following the work, through a series of people, also institutionalizes the handoffs between the people and masks important information about the activities performed by any one person in the chain. Since Agile Management over a decade ago, I've cautioned against this. We aren't interested in the passing of work between the people, we are interested in the dominant activity to discover new information at any given time in the workflow. This chain of activities tends to be much simpler and leads to significantly simpler and easier to comprehend visualization. Yes, the tickets on the board have to circulate if the process is iterative - so what? That is just a reflection of reality - design the kanban system accordingly.


                                  Viewing organizations through a Kanban Lens opens up new possibilities and enables us to set up extensive networks of interdependent kanban systems. Kanban scales in the enterprise by scaling out in a service-oriented fashion and it self-levels to optimize service delivery across a complex set of services, customers and their demands, through the use of a system of systems feedback loop. We call this system of systems feedback loop, the Operations Review.


                                  By adding the Kanban Lens to the literature and the teaching curriculum, we are helping people understand how to establish deep and extensive Kanban implementations that deliver significantly improved service delivery at enterprise scale. The Kanban Lens isn't new, it's just something that was hiding in plain sight and I was taking it for granted. By making it explicit I believe Kanban will be easier to teach and easier to adopt.






                                  --
                                  Karl Scotland
                                  Lean & Agile Coach
                                  http://www.availagility.co.uk/


                                • Mike Burrows
                                  Here s that promised post: One method, three agendas Enjoy, Mike -- Mike Burrows
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Oct 23, 2013

                                    Here's that promised post: One method, three agendas

                                    Enjoy,
                                    Mike



                                    On 23 October 2013 11:34, Mike Burrows <mjb@...> wrote:
                                    Hi Karl,

                                    If you accept my values model (which I map directly to canonical descriptions of the method), there is no "disposition" hole to be filled. The values represent not just what the Kanban method brings, but what we hope to develop over time. Moreover, three of the values - namely customer focus, flow and leadership - are very much about direction (and very well aligned to the renewed emphasis on service orientation and service delivery).

                                    But I digress...

                                    I thnk the crucial point that may be getting missed is that we're talking about a way of looking at things that
                                    1. is about both process and organisation, and
                                    2. may represent a radical departure from current thinking
                                    Even where the concepts don't seem so radical, many of us here know that the effect on the quality and performance of service delivery can be dramatic. It's a paradox that has been observed here before: how is it that the "start with what you do now" method often seem introduce such immediate change?

                                    The big challenge for us here (and to me as much as anyone) is that our emphasis on evolution, continuous improvement, direction, disposition etc may be hiding something really valuable from those who might have the most to benefit from Kanban but aren't seeing that it is likely to meet their needs. We need to fix that.

                                    Watch out for a blog post today or tomorrow. Meanwhile, if you're curious about how to turn the "process of knowledge discovery" concept into action, you may enjoy this one from a few weeks ago: http://positiveincline.com/index.php/2013/09/stand-up-meeting-thinking-tool-leadership-routine/

                                    Regards,
                                    Mike



                                    On 21 October 2013 10:10, Karl Scotland <kjscotland@...> wrote:
                                     

                                    Hi David,

                                    I like this. For me it fills a hole in the Kanban Method, which is "what would be a desirable disposition for a kanban system evolution?" It seems to align with why I like to talk about system impact. In particular, the service-orientation is a link to Value, and the knowledge discovery process is a link to Flow.

                                    I'm wondering about the wording of 3 and whether it could include a reference to the human nature of the knowledge discovery? Or is that implicit?

                                    Karl


                                    On 19 October 2013 05:28, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:


                                    I just blogged this at...


                                    But I thought I'd share the text in full on the list. The Kanban Lens is a new concept I've added to me public talks and we've incorporated into the Foundation level curriculum for certified classes from Lean Kanban University. Here is the blog text...

                                    Regular readers who follow everything I post may already have spotted that I introduced a new way of thinking about Kanban. Like almost all of these "new" things, it isn't new at all. In fact, the concept existed in my first book, Agile Management, published over a decade ago. It took Andy Carmichael attending my coaching masterclass in Hamburg earlier this year to remind me of it. The Kanban Method is unpinned by the concept of "flow." Once again, something hiding in plain sight that I hadn't been thinking about or articulating clearly for a while.


                                    So with my Paris and Utrecht, Lean Kanban Conference key notes, I re-introduced "flow" to the Kanban party. I used the term "Core Enabling Concepts" but we are likely to use the nickname "Kanban Lens" because they give us a way to see things - a way to see how an organization is currently structured and functioning and to then "kanbanize" that existing structure without reorganizing it. Sometimes, a different way to see is all it takes to reveal obviously conflicting policies and catalyze improvements.


                                    The Kanban Lens

                                    1. Service-orientation
                                    2. Service delivery involves workflow
                                    3. Work flows through a series of information discovery activities

                                    Looking at a current organization through a service-oriented lens and seeing services where currently people only see functions and specializations is liberating and empowering. Service-orientation implies service delivery and therefore there must be customers for those services. It is this lens that enables the outside-in systems thinking approach to implementing Kanban that we cover in the Foundation level class curriculum from Lean Kanban University.


                                    That work flows through a series of information discovery activities is a concept borrowed from Lean Product Development. I first saw Don Reinertsen describe it in the early 1990s but he in turn credits the idea to Marvin Patterson. Michael Kennedy has also documented the same idea and I've tried to standardize on using Kennedy's language.


                                    I think many Lean consultants and many in the software development and IT space with an understanding of Lean (from manufacturing) miss the subtlety of this third concept - "work flows through a series of information discovery activities." It does not say, "work flows though a series of people with specialist skills." When mapping value streams, Lean people tell you to "follow the work." I think this is a red herring for knowledge work. Trying to map a complicated value creation network and then visualize it is a distraction. It gives you an overly complicated system and the many loops and joins in the network make visualization challenging. Following the work, through a series of people, also institutionalizes the handoffs between the people and masks important information about the activities performed by any one person in the chain. Since Agile Management over a decade ago, I've cautioned against this. We aren't interested in the passing of work between the people, we are interested in the dominant activity to discover new information at any given time in the workflow. This chain of activities tends to be much simpler and leads to significantly simpler and easier to comprehend visualization. Yes, the tickets on the board have to circulate if the process is iterative - so what? That is just a reflection of reality - design the kanban system accordingly.


                                    Viewing organizations through a Kanban Lens opens up new possibilities and enables us to set up extensive networks of interdependent kanban systems. Kanban scales in the enterprise by scaling out in a service-oriented fashion and it self-levels to optimize service delivery across a complex set of services, customers and their demands, through the use of a system of systems feedback loop. We call this system of systems feedback loop, the Operations Review.


                                    By adding the Kanban Lens to the literature and the teaching curriculum, we are helping people understand how to establish deep and extensive Kanban implementations that deliver significantly improved service delivery at enterprise scale. The Kanban Lens isn't new, it's just something that was hiding in plain sight and I was taking it for granted. By making it explicit I believe Kanban will be easier to teach and easier to adopt.






                                    --
                                    Karl Scotland
                                    Lean & Agile Coach
                                    http://www.availagility.co.uk/



                                  • Karl Scotland
                                    ... You re right - I wouldn t put it like that :-) ... For me the 3 optical regions that your trifocal lens helps focus on are: 1. The service oriented nature
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Oct 24, 2013

                                      On 23 October 2013 02:31, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:

                                      I hope we don't have to encumber the definition with 

                                      Work flows through a series of knowledge discovery activities "performed by humans"

                                      You're right - I wouldn't put it like that :-)

                                      but I do take your point that the wording on 3 could probably be sharpened up

                                      For me the 3 optical regions that your trifocal lens helps focus on are:
                                      1. The service oriented nature of work
                                      2. The workflow within the service orientation
                                      3. The knowledge discovery within the workflow
                                       
                                      I noticed that I think you have used both information discovery and knowledge discovery. I think I prefer knowledge discovery because that feels like it implies the human nature of the work better. Knowledge is a result of humans doing something with the information?

                                      Karl

                                      ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <kanbandev@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                                      Hi David,

                                      I like this. For me it fills a hole in the Kanban Method, which is "what would be a desirable disposition for a kanban system evolution?" It seems to align with why I like to talk about system impact. In particular, the service-orientation is a link to Value, and the knowledge discovery process is a link to Flow.

                                      I'm wondering about the wording of 3 and whether it could include a reference to the human nature of the knowledge discovery? Or is that implicit?

                                      Karl


                                      On 19 October 2013 05:28, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:


                                      I just blogged this at...


                                      But I thought I'd share the text in full on the list. The Kanban Lens is a new concept I've added to me public talks and we've incorporated into the Foundation level curriculum for certified classes from Lean Kanban University. Here is the blog text...

                                      Regular readers who follow everything I post may already have spotted that I introduced a new way of thinking about Kanban. Like almost all of these "new" things, it isn't new at all. In fact, the concept existed in my first book, Agile Management, published over a decade ago. It took Andy Carmichael attending my coaching masterclass in Hamburg earlier this year to remind me of it. The Kanban Method is unpinned by the concept of "flow." Once again, something hiding in plain sight that I hadn't been thinking about or articulating clearly for a while.


                                      So with my Paris and Utrecht, Lean Kanban Conference key notes, I re-introduced "flow" to the Kanban party. I used the term "Core Enabling Concepts" but we are likely to use the nickname "Kanban Lens" because they give us a way to see things - a way to see how an organization is currently structured and functioning and to then "kanbanize" that existing structure without reorganizing it. Sometimes, a different way to see is all it takes to reveal obviously conflicting policies and catalyze improvements.


                                      The Kanban Lens

                                      1. Service-orientation
                                      2. Service delivery involves workflow
                                      3. Work flows through a series of information discovery activities

                                      Looking at a current organization through a service-oriented lens and seeing services where currently people only see functions and specializations is liberating and empowering. Service-orientation implies service delivery and therefore there must be customers for those services. It is this lens that enables the outside-in systems thinking approach to implementing Kanban that we cover in the Foundation level class curriculum from Lean Kanban University.


                                      That work flows through a series of information discovery activities is a concept borrowed from Lean Product Development. I first saw Don Reinertsen describe it in the early 1990s but he in turn credits the idea to Marvin Patterson. Michael Kennedy has also documented the same idea and I've tried to standardize on using Kennedy's language.


                                      I think many Lean consultants and many in the software development and IT space with an understanding of Lean (from manufacturing) miss the subtlety of this third concept - "work flows through a series of information discovery activities." It does not say, "work flows though a series of people with specialist skills." When mapping value streams, Lean people tell you to "follow the work." I think this is a red herring for knowledge work. Trying to map a complicated value creation network and then visualize it is a distraction. It gives you an overly complicated system and the many loops and joins in the network make visualization challenging. Following the work, through a series of people, also institutionalizes the handoffs between the people and masks important information about the activities performed by any one person in the chain. Since Agile Management over a decade ago, I've cautioned against this. We aren't interested in the passing of work between the people, we are interested in the dominant activity to discover new information at any given time in the workflow. This chain of activities tends to be much simpler and leads to significantly simpler and easier to comprehend visualization. Yes, the tickets on the board have to circulate if the process is iterative - so what? That is just a reflection of reality - design the kanban system accordingly.


                                      Viewing organizations through a Kanban Lens opens up new possibilities and enables us to set up extensive networks of interdependent kanban systems. Kanban scales in the enterprise by scaling out in a service-oriented fashion and it self-levels to optimize service delivery across a complex set of services, customers and their demands, through the use of a system of systems feedback loop. We call this system of systems feedback loop, the Operations Review.


                                      By adding the Kanban Lens to the literature and the teaching curriculum, we are helping people understand how to establish deep and extensive Kanban implementations that deliver significantly improved service delivery at enterprise scale. The Kanban Lens isn't new, it's just something that was hiding in plain sight and I was taking it for granted. By making it explicit I believe Kanban will be easier to teach and easier to adopt.






                                      --
                                      Karl Scotland
                                      Lean & Agile Coach
                                      http://www.availagility.co.uk/





                                      --
                                      Karl Scotland
                                      Lean & Agile Coach
                                      http://www.availagility.co.uk/
                                    • Karl Scotland
                                      Hi Mike ... I do accept your values model, and agree they help set direction. I hadn t considered them part of the Kanban Method, but a compatible extension
                                      Message 18 of 20 , Oct 24, 2013

                                        Hi Mike

                                        On 23 October 2013 11:34, Mike Burrows <mjb@...> wrote:

                                        If you accept my values model (which I map directly to canonical descriptions of the method), there is no "disposition" hole to be filled. The values represent not just what the Kanban method brings, but what we hope to develop over time. Moreover, three of the values - namely customer focus, flow and leadership - are very much about direction (and very well aligned to the renewed emphasis on service orientation and service delivery).

                                        I do accept your values model, and agree they help set direction. I hadn't considered them part of the Kanban Method, but a compatible extension which is also filling a gap.

                                        Karl
                                      • Mike Burrows
                                        That s fair. A compatible extension with the ambition to be adopted into the core :-) -- Mike Burrows mjb@asplake.co.uk http://positiveincline.com
                                        Message 19 of 20 , Oct 24, 2013

                                          That's fair.  A compatible extension with the ambition to be adopted into the core :-)



                                          On 24 October 2013 10:09, Karl Scotland <kjscotland@...> wrote:
                                           


                                          Hi Mike

                                          On 23 October 2013 11:34, Mike Burrows <mjb@...> wrote:

                                          If you accept my values model (which I map directly to canonical descriptions of the method), there is no "disposition" hole to be filled. The values represent not just what the Kanban method brings, but what we hope to develop over time. Moreover, three of the values - namely customer focus, flow and leadership - are very much about direction (and very well aligned to the renewed emphasis on service orientation and service delivery).

                                          I do accept your values model, and agree they help set direction. I hadn't considered them part of the Kanban Method, but a compatible extension which is also filling a gap.

                                          Karl


                                        • netherby_uk
                                          Yes, I like this better. Thanks. And yes, knowledge discovery is the Michael Kennedy term that I ve been trying to standardize on. I ve been reading too much
                                          Message 20 of 20 , Oct 24, 2013
                                            Yes, I like this better. Thanks. And yes, "knowledge discovery" is the Michael Kennedy term that I've been trying to standardize on. I've been reading too much Real Option theory stuff recently with its "information arrival process" terminology. I need to be careful not to mix those ideas and terms.

                                             



                                            ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <kanbandev@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                                            On 23 October 2013 02:31, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:

                                            I hope we don't have to encumber the definition with 

                                            Work flows through a series of knowledge discovery activities "performed by humans"

                                            You're right - I wouldn't put it like that :-)

                                            but I do take your point that the wording on 3 could probably be sharpened up

                                            For me the 3 optical regions that your trifocal lens helps focus on are:
                                            1. The service oriented nature of work
                                            2. The workflow within the service orientation
                                            3. The knowledge discovery within the workflow
                                             
                                            I noticed that I think you have used both information discovery and knowledge discovery. I think I prefer knowledge discovery because that feels like it implies the human nature of the work better. Knowledge is a result of humans doing something with the information?

                                            Karl

                                            ---In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, <kanbandev@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                                            Hi David,

                                            I like this. For me it fills a hole in the Kanban Method, which is "what would be a desirable disposition for a kanban system evolution?" It seems to align with why I like to talk about system impact. In particular, the service-orientation is a link to Value, and the knowledge discovery process is a link to Flow.

                                            I'm wondering about the wording of 3 and whether it could include a reference to the human nature of the knowledge discovery? Or is that implicit?

                                            Karl


                                            On 19 October 2013 05:28, <netherby_uk@...> wrote:


                                            I just blogged this at...


                                            But I thought I'd share the text in full on the list. The Kanban Lens is a new concept I've added to me public talks and we've incorporated into the Foundation level curriculum for certified classes from Lean Kanban University. Here is the blog text...

                                            Regular readers who follow everything I post may already have spotted that I introduced a new way of thinking about Kanban. Like almost all of these "new" things, it isn't new at all. In fact, the concept existed in my first book, Agile Management, published over a decade ago. It took Andy Carmichael attending my coaching masterclass in Hamburg earlier this year to remind me of it. The Kanban Method is unpinned by the concept of "flow." Once again, something hiding in plain sight that I hadn't been thinking about or articulating clearly for a while.


                                            So with my Paris and Utrecht, Lean Kanban Conference key notes, I re-introduced "flow" to the Kanban party. I used the term "Core Enabling Concepts" but we are likely to use the nickname "Kanban Lens" because they give us a way to see things - a way to see how an organization is currently structured and functioning and to then "kanbanize" that existing structure without reorganizing it. Sometimes, a different way to see is all it takes to reveal obviously conflicting policies and catalyze improvements.


                                            The Kanban Lens

                                            1. Service-orientation
                                            2. Service delivery involves workflow
                                            3. Work flows through a series of information discovery activities

                                            Looking at a current organization through a service-oriented lens and seeing services where currently people only see functions and specializations is liberating and empowering. Service-orientation implies service delivery and therefore there must be customers for those services. It is this lens that enables the outside-in systems thinking approach to implementing Kanban that we cover in the Foundation level class curriculum from Lean Kanban University.


                                            That work flows through a series of information discovery activities is a concept borrowed from Lean Product Development. I first saw Don Reinertsen describe it in the early 1990s but he in turn credits the idea to Marvin Patterson. Michael Kennedy has also documented the same idea and I've tried to standardize on using Kennedy's language.


                                            I think many Lean consultants and many in the software development and IT space with an understanding of Lean (from manufacturing) miss the subtlety of this third concept - "work flows through a series of information discovery activities." It does not say, "work flows though a series of people with specialist skills." When mapping value streams, Lean people tell you to "follow the work." I think this is a red herring for knowledge work. Trying to map a complicated value creation network and then visualize it is a distraction. It gives you an overly complicated system and the many loops and joins in the network make visualization challenging. Following the work, through a series of people, also institutionalizes the handoffs between the people and masks important information about the activities performed by any one person in the chain. Since Agile Management over a decade ago, I've cautioned against this. We aren't interested in the passing of work between the people, we are interested in the dominant activity to discover new information at any given time in the workflow. This chain of activities tends to be much simpler and leads to significantly simpler and easier to comprehend visualization. Yes, the tickets on the board have to circulate if the process is iterative - so what? That is just a reflection of reality - design the kanban system accordingly.


                                            Viewing organizations through a Kanban Lens opens up new possibilities and enables us to set up extensive networks of interdependent kanban systems. Kanban scales in the enterprise by scaling out in a service-oriented fashion and it self-levels to optimize service delivery across a complex set of services, customers and their demands, through the use of a system of systems feedback loop. We call this system of systems feedback loop, the Operations Review.


                                            By adding the Kanban Lens to the literature and the teaching curriculum, we are helping people understand how to establish deep and extensive Kanban implementations that deliver significantly improved service delivery at enterprise scale. The Kanban Lens isn't new, it's just something that was hiding in plain sight and I was taking it for granted. By making it explicit I believe Kanban will be easier to teach and easier to adopt.






                                            --
                                            Karl Scotland
                                            Lean & Agile Coach
                                            http://www.availagility.co.uk/





                                            --
                                            Karl Scotland
                                            Lean & Agile Coach
                                            http://www.availagility.co.uk/
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