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Sirens and Rocks in Agile Kanban Initiatives

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  • Joseph Hurtado
    Hi there everyone, I would like to open a discussion about some traps that are common to most Kanban initiatives. What these share in common is that they
    Message 1 of 42 , Dec 18, 2012
      Hi there everyone,
       
      I would like to open a discussion about some traps that are common to most Kanban initiatives.
       
      What these share in common is that they initially look alluring and even desirable to the novice Kanban Practitioner. I used the metaphor of Greek mythology, since it seems to fit the situation we face in our Kanban Journey. 
       
      These traps are a combination of Sirens, a tempting good outcome, which will lead people to the rocks or eventual but sure disaster.
       
      There are many traps out there, which in your experience are those deadly Sirens and Rocks that you would like to warn us about?
       
      I will share only one, to get the conversation started:
      - An obsession with the elimination of waste. This will eventually lead to disaster, bringing morale down, introducing a culture of fear and taking away the freedom we need in all creative work.
       
      Cheers,
       
      Joseph Hurtado
      Founder Agile Lion Institute
      http://AgileLion.com
      @AgileLionInst
      @JosephHurtado 
    • John Miller
      Thanks Rob. I am very much enjoying the people and conversations on this list Thank You, John Sent from my iPhone. It likes to sabotage my grammar. On Dec 21,
      Message 42 of 42 , Dec 26, 2012
        Thanks Rob. I am very much enjoying the people and conversations on this list  

        Thank You,
        John 
        Sent from my iPhone. It likes to sabotage my grammar. 


        On Dec 21, 2012, at 11:31 AM, Rob_Ferguson <rob_ferguson@...> wrote:

         

        Hi John,

        I see your point regarding customer value and can understand where you're coming from. Here's what I was talking about: "Does this add value to what you do" is the same question as "What's the value in doing that?" What's the value in making sure all the unit tests pass? What's the value in UAT? What's the value in functional tests?

        An example on how this worked on our team: when we first mapped our value stream, one of the steps in our existing process was "team code review." When asked, "Does that add value to what you do" (or "What's the value of doing that?") it opened up a great discussion. For our Kanban team that step in the process evolved to peer code review. It was determined that there is "value" (to the team, or in building quality software) in doing code reviews but team code review, being harder to schedule, was becoming a constraint to our flow.

        I hope that makes sense.

        Cheers!

        Rob

        --- In kanbandev@yahoogroups.com, John Miller <agileschools@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi All,
        >
        > I am having trouble following this particular thread about "value". It is perhaps just me and my limited understanding.
        >
        > I have always viewed "value" as "customer value" (end result) and "our ability to deliver customer value" (capacity and sustainability to deliver it). So, when I read "value", things that protect the organization from distractions and setbacks, like regulation compliance, are valuable, as it would divert resources of the organization to deliver value to the customer if we had to be in courts and fight a PR battle by being out of compliance. Focusing on high morale of the team is valuable, since, it builds and sustains capacity to deliver value to the customer. Growing mastery of skills is valuable, as it allows us to increase value to the customer, Going to the bathroom is definitely highly valuable! "Adding value" would mean anything that allows us to add customer value or perhaps prevent customer value decline from a systems perspective. Value = All contributions to the system(s) that sustains and/or enhances benefits to the customer.
        >
        > Perhaps I am not on the same page on the definition of value or am having trouble following the thread for some other reason. Thanks, great thread : )
        >
        > John Miller
        > http://agileschools.blogspot.com/

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