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Re: [kanbandev] German Kanban & Kaizen case study

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  • Jack Vinson
    Translations are always available on the first pass from Google Translate (and probably some others). Give this a whirl:
    Message 1 of 20 , Mar 27, 2012
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      Translations are always available on the first pass from Google Translate (and probably some others).  Give this a whirl: http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=de&tl=en&js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.loop-2.net%2Ffallstudie_hypoport

      On Tue, Mar 27, 2012 at 7:07 AM, Doug Boling <doug.boling@...> wrote:


      Any chance of getting a translation for those of us who are barely able to speak American English (as opposed to the King's English)?  I have a hard enough time with one language much less two.  However, necessity is the mother of invention.  I have learned to read your beer labels. <smile>

      Doug Boling 


      On Mon, Mar 26, 2012 at 8:57 AM, Thomas <thomas.scholz@...> wrote:
       

      Hi there,

      my name is Thomas and I'm currently working at loop-2.net in Germany. I'm following your group for almost a year now and I really appreciate all the inspiring discussions and topics. Now it's my turn to give something back at least for the German members in terms of a Kanban & Kaizen case study written in German.

      Six months ago we started an implementation of Kanban & Kaizen at Hypoport AG. The course of action and the results were summarized in a case study and a video that can be found here:

      http://www.loop-2.net/fallstudie_hypoport

      Best regards,

      Thomas





    • brucemount@aol.com
      THANK YOU to everyone who took the time to tell me what s on your Kanban cards! That was a huge help! --Bruce
      Message 2 of 20 , Mar 27, 2012
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        THANK YOU to everyone who took the time to tell me what's on your Kanban cards!  That was a huge help!

        --Bruce

      • Matthias Bohlen
        Hello Thomas, nice wrap up of a very systematic introduction of a Kanban system! Thank you for sharing this! Best regards, Matthias Bohlen
        Message 3 of 20 , Mar 27, 2012
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          Hello Thomas,
          nice wrap up of a very systematic introduction of a Kanban system!

          Thank you for sharing this!

          Best regards,
          Matthias Bohlen


          --- sent from a mobile device ---


          Am 26.03.2012 um 14:57 schrieb "Thomas" <thomas.scholz@...>:

           

          Hi there,

          my name is Thomas and I'm currently working at loop-2.net in Germany. I'm following your group for almost a year now and I really appreciate all the inspiring discussions and topics. Now it's my turn to give something back at least for the German members in terms of a Kanban & Kaizen case study written in German.

          Six months ago we started an implementation of Kanban & Kaizen at Hypoport AG. The course of action and the results were summarized in a case study and a video that can be found here:

          http://www.loop-2.net/fallstudie_hypoport

          Best regards,

          Thomas

        • Zsolt Fabok
          Hi Thomas, Thank you for the answers, they are very useful! Cheers, Zsolt ... Hi Thomas, Thank you for the answers, they are very useful! Cheers, Zsolt On Tue,
          Message 4 of 20 , Mar 28, 2012
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            Hi Thomas,

            Thank you for the answers, they are very useful!

            Cheers,
            Zsolt

            On Tue, Mar 27, 2012 at 2:47 PM, Thomas <thomas.scholz@...> wrote:
             

            Hi Zsolt,

            With regards to the “pull from two sources” that’s exactly what happens. One random representative of each team discuss every morning the current status at the single source board (ssb) with other representatives and the product owner. The ssb is the main information radiator where bugs, improvements (internal and external), change requests and epics etc were summed up. Depending of the capacity of each team items can be pulled regarding their priority.

            If an epic gets pulled the first step is to separate it in different user stories and tasks and estimate the amount of work (story points). The last column of the so called project board acts as a queue where developers are allowed to pull tasks that are nearly the same size as bugs, crs etc. handled on the so called kanban board. This course of action is based on the fact that the current workload is balanced (50% maintenance, 50% feature development). The priority among all items on the kanban board is visualized by different colors or lanes.  

            An improvement meeting or so called “red-line-process” (referring to the andon system in the TPS) takes place if a limit is crossed. The team got a little star trek figure that shouts “we’re maxed out, captain” (I apologize to all the trekkies if the translation doesn’t fit). If somebody is pressing the Checkov the team gets together to analyze the bottleneck and discuss possible solutions (the usual process is covered at fig. 5). Furthermore the bottleneck gets documented on little card. Those cards were discussed every two weeks in the second part of the kaizen meeting. Measures that were approved during the kaizen meeting(s) are part of the ssb as well.

            The drop in the CFD is in deed curious but sometimes items get transferred from one team to another team due to different knowledge level, staff changes etc. This is not exactly how it should be, but in theory, theory and practice are the same ;)

            Best regards,

            Thomas

            @ Doug: I’m sorry there are no plans for a translation yet,but the next case study will be in English as well

            @ Rob: Thank you.


          • Karl Scotland
            Hi Bruce, I wrote up my thoughts on kanban visualisation design here: http://availagility.co.uk/2011/09/26/a-kanban-visualisation-tip/
            Message 5 of 20 , Mar 28, 2012
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              Hi Bruce,

              I wrote up my thoughts on kanban visualisation design here:
              http://availagility.co.uk/2011/09/26/a-kanban-visualisation-tip/
              http://availagility.co.uk/2011/12/22/visualising-kanban-dimensions-with-tips/

              Might give you some ideas on how to design boards and cards, given the contextual nature of things :)

              Karl

              On 27 March 2012 17:53, <brucemount@...> wrote:


              THANK YOU to everyone who took the time to tell me what's on your Kanban cards!  That was a huge help!

              --Bruce






              --
              Karl Scotland
              Lean & Agile Coach
              http://www.availagility.co.uk/
            • brucemount@aol.com
              Karl: Wow, you never cease to amazing with how much useful information you have and how generous you are in sharing it. This hands on view of Kanban is
              Message 6 of 20 , Mar 28, 2012
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                Karl:

                Wow, you never cease to amazing with how much useful information you have and how generous you are in sharing it.  This "hands on" view of Kanban is incredibly helpful, thank you.

                --Bruce


                -----Original Message-----
                From: Karl Scotland <kjscotland@...>
                To: kanbandev <kanbandev@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Wed, Mar 28, 2012 12:47 pm
                Subject: Re: [kanbandev] What do you put on your Kanban card?

                 
                Hi Bruce,

                I wrote up my thoughts on kanban visualisation design here:
                http://availagility.co.uk/2011/09/26/a-kanban-visualisation-tip/
                http://availagility.co.uk/2011/12/22/visualising-kanban-dimensions-with-tips/

                Might give you some ideas on how to design boards and cards, given the contextual nature of things :)

                Karl

                On 27 March 2012 17:53, <brucemount@...> wrote:


                THANK YOU to everyone who took the time to tell me what's on your Kanban cards!  That was a huge help!

                --Bruce






                --
                Karl Scotland
                Lean & Agile Coach
                http://www.availagility.co.uk/
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