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Re: Kafka and Derrida (deconstruction)

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  • nicoleh7
    Hi group, For those of you who would be interested in the article of Martha Robinson I refer to in my previous post (see below) please note that the URL has
    Message 1 of 5 , May 27, 2005
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      Hi group,

      For those of you who would be interested in the article of Martha
      Robinson I refer to in my previous post (see below) please note that
      the URL has changed to :


      http://tarlton.law.utexas.edu/lpop/etext/lsf/robinson6.htm

      My apologies for not having checked the link before posting.

      Best
      Nicole



      --- In kafka-list@yahoogroups.com, "nicoleh7" <nicoleh7@y...> wrote:
      > Hi Janet
      >
      > What an intersting post !
      > I confess to not having read much of Derrida, getting (too?) easily
      > irritated by what I experience as his pedantry.
      >
      > But the way you present his thesis about Kafka makes it
      fascinating !
      > You must be an excellent teacher !
      >
      > For a totally different approach of The Trial, you might like to
      read
      > Martha Robinson's article "The Law of the State in Kafka's The
      > Trial" :
      >
      > http://www.law.utexas.edu/lpop/etext/lsf/robinson6.htm
      >
      > The author gives a lot of information about the legal system in the
      > Austrian Empire at the time Kafka lived and contends that many
      > elements in the Trial are a satire of it.
      >
      > When you have the time, please let us know how your research is
      going.
      >
      > Best
      > Nicole
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In kafka-list@yahoogroups.com, "his_assistants"
      > <his_assistants@y...> wrote:
      > > Hello,
      > >
      > > My name is Janet Lucas. I obtained my Ph.D. in 2003 and currently
      > > teach English Literature (modernism in particular) at the
      University
      > > of Toronto and York University.
      > >
      > > My current research has led me to Kafka (I love his work and have
      > all
      > > of major novels and short stories). Kafka's writing,
      particularly
      > in
      > > The Castle and The Trial led me to Derrida. Derrida, at least in
      > his
      > > earlier work, e.g., "Structure, Sign and Play...," "Differance"
      and
      > > Grammatology, focused on how while the structure was predicated
      > upon a
      > > presence--a presence that would fix the play of meaning--it was in
      > > fact predicated upon an absence. This is played out (forgive the
      > pun)
      > > in The Castle and The Trial. Kafka's writing reveals as a
      discourse
      > > predicated upon absence, though (and importantly), the characters
      > > unquestioningly believe in a 'presence,.' and it is precisely
      their
      > > belief that simultaneously enforces a presence while revealing its
      > > absence. Specifically, it is the constant 'play' of the
      characters
      > in
      > > their acting in accordance with a presence that does not exist
      (but
      > > exists only to the extent that they believe it; and as such
      > > continually construct it)--something that a presence is supposed
      to
      > > limit--that The Castle and The Trial reveals the lack of a master
      > > signifier (the Law, God, etc.)
      > >
      > > My concern here is that I might be arguing a point that has
      already
      > > been made. If anyone can let me know, or has any ideas on the
      > subject,
      > > please let me know.
      > >
      > > --
      > > Sincerely,
      > >
      > > Janet L. Lucas, Ph.D.
      > > University of Toronto
      > > York University
      > > e-mail: jlucas@y...
      > > web: www.yorku.ca/jlucas
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