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Re: [kafka-list] Gregor REALLY a bug?

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  • Cady godess
    Very interesting. ... ===== Listen to the MUSTN TS child, Listen to the DONT s Listen to the SHOULDN TS, the IMPOSSIBLES, the WON TS Listen to the NEVER HAVES,
    Message 1 of 12 , Mar 29, 2004
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      Very interesting.

      --- Putrescent Stench of Death
      <putrescent_stench@...> wrote:
      > Something can be written in a concrete, or literal,
      > context, without actually having happened in real
      > life.
      >
      > There's nothing in the text itself that implies the
      > transformation is "surreal" or "a dream." Kafka
      > often
      > writes about things happening that don't happen in
      > real life (as far as we know), and these events are
      > symbolic, but to be a symbol, something must first
      > be
      > the thing it is before it can be what it symbolizes.
      > Kafka's style is very dry, mundane, and unadorned, I
      > think that's because he wanted the events to seem
      > more
      > believable. When something is surreal, there is an
      > ambiguity as to what's happening, what's being
      > represented. Kafka's writing isn't like that at all.
      > It's mundane, clear, and precise. Think of painting.
      > Salvador Dali is surrealist. Kafka would be more
      > like
      > the modernist painting of the fall of Icarus; the
      > majority of the painting is taken up by workers
      > plowing in a field, showing everyday activities, and
      > in the background, there's a little figure falling
      > from the sky, barely noticable. This is more Kafka's
      > style to me.
      >
      > How can the story go on after Gregor is dead if he's
      > dreaming it? Also, if it's a dream, why is it told
      > through 3rd person? There's a difference between
      > soemthing having metaphorical implications, and
      > actually being a metaphor.
      >
      > I actually think it's important that Gregor's
      > metamorphosis is a literal one. If his change is
      > just
      > a dream, then the whole story is a kind of "trick,"
      > and nothing significant is really coming from the
      > change. However, if it is a literal change, then
      > there
      > is a definite revelation going on, to Gregor and to
      > the people around him.
      >
      > Andrew
      >
      > =====
      > For the most part the phenomenology of the world is
      > a nightmarish excrescence.
      >
      >
      > All these buildings. What did Talbert want to
      > do--sodomize the Festival Hall?
      >
      > __________________________________
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      > Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free web site building tool.
      > Try it!
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      >


      =====
      Listen to the MUSTN'TS child, Listen to the DONT's
      Listen to the SHOULDN'TS, the IMPOSSIBLES, the WON'TS
      Listen to the NEVER HAVES, then Listen close to me
      ANYTHING can happen child, ANYTHING can be

      __________________________________
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      Yahoo! Finance Tax Center - File online. File on time.
      http://taxes.yahoo.com/filing.html
    • Mykel
      it s has been said that maybe Gregor was dead from the start, that in fact the metamorphosis in itself is DEATH that DEATH is the final form. In my mind as I
      Message 2 of 12 , Apr 4, 2004
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        it's has been said that maybe Gregor was dead from the start, that
        in fact the metamorphosis in itself is "DEATH" that DEATH is the
        final form.

        In my mind as I read the metamorphisis . I noticed that this
        metamorphisis doesn't take place EVER. if GREGOR is a BUG when he
        awakes. We as the reader never SEE ANY METAMORPHOSIS?... however we
        do witness the family metamorphosis. Right in front of our eyes...
        they change constantly. The story continues after Gregor dies from
        an apple wound... because the metamorphosis has yet to be
        witnessed... Specially the sister who goes from young girl who in
        the beginning is CRYING while Gregor's boss comes to check up on
        him... to WORKING WOMEN.. worthy to be married off.


        --- In kafka-list@yahoogroups.com, Cady godess <cady_godess@y...>
        wrote:
        > Very interesting.
        >
        > --- Putrescent Stench of Death
        > <putrescent_stench@y...> wrote:
        > > Something can be written in a concrete, or literal,
        > > context, without actually having happened in real
        > > life.
        > >
        > > There's nothing in the text itself that implies the
        > > transformation is "surreal" or "a dream." Kafka
        > > often
        > > writes about things happening that don't happen in
        > > real life (as far as we know), and these events are
        > > symbolic, but to be a symbol, something must first
        > > be
        > > the thing it is before it can be what it symbolizes.
        > > Kafka's style is very dry, mundane, and unadorned, I
        > > think that's because he wanted the events to seem
        > > more
        > > believable. When something is surreal, there is an
        > > ambiguity as to what's happening, what's being
        > > represented. Kafka's writing isn't like that at all.
        > > It's mundane, clear, and precise. Think of painting.
        > > Salvador Dali is surrealist. Kafka would be more
        > > like
        > > the modernist painting of the fall of Icarus; the
        > > majority of the painting is taken up by workers
        > > plowing in a field, showing everyday activities, and
        > > in the background, there's a little figure falling
        > > from the sky, barely noticable. This is more Kafka's
        > > style to me.
        > >
        > > How can the story go on after Gregor is dead if he's
        > > dreaming it? Also, if it's a dream, why is it told
        > > through 3rd person? There's a difference between
        > > soemthing having metaphorical implications, and
        > > actually being a metaphor.
        > >
        > > I actually think it's important that Gregor's
        > > metamorphosis is a literal one. If his change is
        > > just
        > > a dream, then the whole story is a kind of "trick,"
        > > and nothing significant is really coming from the
        > > change. However, if it is a literal change, then
        > > there
        > > is a definite revelation going on, to Gregor and to
        > > the people around him.
        > >
        > > Andrew
        > >
        > > =====
        > > For the most part the phenomenology of the world is
        > > a nightmarish excrescence.
        > >
        > >
        > > All these buildings. What did Talbert want to
        > > do--sodomize the Festival Hall?
        > >
        > > __________________________________
        > > Do you Yahoo!?
        > > Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free web site building tool.
        > > Try it!
        > > http://webhosting.yahoo.com/ps/sb/
        > >
        >
        >
        > =====
        > Listen to the MUSTN'TS child, Listen to the DONT's
        > Listen to the SHOULDN'TS, the IMPOSSIBLES, the WON'TS
        > Listen to the NEVER HAVES, then Listen close to me
        > ANYTHING can happen child, ANYTHING can be
        >
        > __________________________________
        > Do you Yahoo!?
        > Yahoo! Finance Tax Center - File online. File on time.
        > http://taxes.yahoo.com/filing.html
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