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I just bought a K5

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  • Emil
    Hello, I ve been a member of this group for a while, hoping that I would have my own K5 again someday. When I was in my mid teens in the late 80 s I had an
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 19, 2009
      Hello, I've been a member of this group for a while, hoping that I would have my own K5 again someday. When I was in my mid teens in the late 80's I had an absolute fascination with the Kawai K5. It wasn't everywhere, but I idolized it as a super-synthesizer from what I read about it, how it sounded in the store, how "realistic" the piano was on the soundpage from my keyboard magazine and the fact that my piano instructor played out on one once. He told me all about it and I got jealous.

      So when they were being discounted towards the end of their product run, I bought one mail ordered from Sam Ash Music. I had it for nearly a month and really had some awesome time programming it. I especially liked messing around with it's filters. It did this weird thing with them linked to the lfo that I would like to hear again someday.

      Anyways I was about 15 or 16 at the time and the new K1 line caught my eyes and ears. I returned the K5 for a K1m and then later sold that for a K1II. I wound up selling that for a new K4(of course). Then I ditched digital altogether for many years to focus on real pianos, B3's and many other heavy keyboards, but alas I still have a place in my mind that tells me that the K5 is magical. So I've wanted one to replace the one I returned 19-20 years ago. I no longer get to do much with the heavy keyboards anymore anyways. In fact I mainly play a Kawai MP8 stage piano and that's it.

      So I found a K5 on ebay that was advertised as fully functional. I paid $175 for it. It turns on and the lcd is not too dim. It even came with a ram card, but the thing has zero presets or stored patches. It makes a noise, but I'd have to program every thing anew just to have some useful sounds. Also, most of the buttons don't function unless I press them hard. What do I need to do with this to restore it? I don't want it to wind up in the basement collecting dust with my collection of vintage keyboards that have issues that cost too much to fix. Am I going to be able to play this thing? What do I need to do?
    • jonathan_01uk
      Sounds like a flat inetrnal battery . . . not sure about the button being stiff, though.
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 20, 2009
        Sounds like a flat inetrnal battery . . . not sure about the button being stiff, though.

        --- In k5synth@yahoogroups.com, "Emil" <educabilia@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello, I've been a member of this group for a while, hoping that I would have my own K5 again someday. When I was in my mid teens in the late 80's I had an absolute fascination with the Kawai K5. It wasn't everywhere, but I idolized it as a super-synthesizer from what I read about it, how it sounded in the store, how "realistic" the piano was on the soundpage from my keyboard magazine and the fact that my piano instructor played out on one once. He told me all about it and I got jealous.
        >
        > So when they were being discounted towards the end of their product run, I bought one mail ordered from Sam Ash Music. I had it for nearly a month and really had some awesome time programming it. I especially liked messing around with it's filters. It did this weird thing with them linked to the lfo that I would like to hear again someday.
        >
        > Anyways I was about 15 or 16 at the time and the new K1 line caught my eyes and ears. I returned the K5 for a K1m and then later sold that for a K1II. I wound up selling that for a new K4(of course). Then I ditched digital altogether for many years to focus on real pianos, B3's and many other heavy keyboards, but alas I still have a place in my mind that tells me that the K5 is magical. So I've wanted one to replace the one I returned 19-20 years ago. I no longer get to do much with the heavy keyboards anymore anyways. In fact I mainly play a Kawai MP8 stage piano and that's it.
        >
        > So I found a K5 on ebay that was advertised as fully functional. I paid $175 for it. It turns on and the lcd is not too dim. It even came with a ram card, but the thing has zero presets or stored patches. It makes a noise, but I'd have to program every thing anew just to have some useful sounds. Also, most of the buttons don't function unless I press them hard. What do I need to do with this to restore it? I don't want it to wind up in the basement collecting dust with my collection of vintage keyboards that have issues that cost too much to fix. Am I going to be able to play this thing? What do I need to do?
        >
      • Antoine Deschênes
        If the card has nothing on it, either it was formatted, or it has a dead battery. Better change it after all those years. You can send presets through MIDI,
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 20, 2009
          If the card has nothing on it, either it was formatted, or it has a dead
          battery. Better change it after all those years.
          You can send presets through MIDI, it's quite simple in fact. (There are
          SysEx files to send in the Files section of the group)

          As for the buttons, I've always lived with them, but I bought many
          DeoxIT products recently for various repairs, so I'll try to see if that
          works and get back with instructions if it works. We've made some
          instructions on http://kfuenf.org/ if I remember correctly, but it
          involved a possible destruction of the button to be repaired (pulling
          hard with pliers to disassemble it) so I'm not too sure it's the best
          solution anymore.

          If you haven't already, take a look at http://kfuenf.org/ , there a good
          bit on information over there.



          Le 2009-04-20 00:06, Emil a écrit :
          > Hello, I've been a member of this group for a while, hoping that I would have my own K5 again someday. When I was in my mid teens in the late 80's I had an absolute fascination with the Kawai K5. It wasn't everywhere, but I idolized it as a super-synthesizer from what I read about it, how it sounded in the store, how "realistic" the piano was on the soundpage from my keyboard magazine and the fact that my piano instructor played out on one once. He told me all about it and I got jealous.
          >
          > So when they were being discounted towards the end of their product run, I bought one mail ordered from Sam Ash Music. I had it for nearly a month and really had some awesome time programming it. I especially liked messing around with it's filters. It did this weird thing with them linked to the lfo that I would like to hear again someday.
          >
          > Anyways I was about 15 or 16 at the time and the new K1 line caught my eyes and ears. I returned the K5 for a K1m and then later sold that for a K1II. I wound up selling that for a new K4(of course). Then I ditched digital altogether for many years to focus on real pianos, B3's and many other heavy keyboards, but alas I still have a place in my mind that tells me that the K5 is magical. So I've wanted one to replace the one I returned 19-20 years ago. I no longer get to do much with the heavy keyboards anymore anyways. In fact I mainly play a Kawai MP8 stage piano and that's it.
          >
          > So I found a K5 on ebay that was advertised as fully functional. I paid $175 for it. It turns on and the lcd is not too dim. It even came with a ram card, but the thing has zero presets or stored patches. It makes a noise, but I'd have to program every thing anew just to have some useful sounds. Also, most of the buttons don't function unless I press them hard. What do I need to do with this to restore it? I don't want it to wind up in the basement collecting dust with my collection of vintage keyboards that have issues that cost too much to fix. Am I going to be able to play this thing? What do I need to do?
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Bruce Manning
          Emil,   The K5 is a magical keyboard and is a rarity in the synth industry still. Congratulations on your purchase. ... From: Antoine Deschênes
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 20, 2009
            Emil,
             
            The K5 is a magical keyboard and is a rarity in the synth industry still.
            Congratulations on your purchase.

            --- On Mon, 4/20/09, Antoine Deschênes <antdes45@...> wrote:
            From: Antoine Deschênes <antdes45@...>
            Subject: Re: [k5synth] I just bought a K5
            To: k5synth@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Monday, April 20, 2009, 8:46 AM

            If the card has nothing on it, either it was formatted, or it has a dead
            battery. Better change it after all those years.
            You can send presets through MIDI, it's quite simple in fact. (There are
            SysEx files to send in the Files section of the group)

            As for the buttons, I've always lived with them, but I bought many
            DeoxIT products recently for various repairs, so I'll try to see if that
            works and get back with instructions if it works. We've made some
            instructions on http://kfuenf. org/ if I remember correctly, but it
            involved a possible destruction of the button to be repaired (pulling
            hard with pliers to disassemble it) so I'm not too sure it's the best
            solution anymore.

            If you haven't already, take a look at http://kfuenf. org/ , there a good
            bit on information over there.

            Le 2009-04-20 00:06, Emil a écrit :
            > Hello, I've been a member of this group for a while, hoping that I would have my own K5 again someday. When I was in my mid teens in the late 80's I had an absolute fascination with the Kawai K5. It wasn't everywhere, but I idolized it as a super-synthesizer from what I read about it, how it sounded in the store, how "realistic" the piano was on the soundpage from my keyboard magazine and the fact that my piano instructor played out on one once. He told me all about it and I got jealous.
            >
            > So when they were being discounted towards the end of their product run, I bought one mail ordered from Sam Ash Music. I had it for nearly a month and really had some awesome time programming it. I especially liked messing around with it's filters. It did this weird thing with them linked to the lfo that I would like to hear again someday.
            >
            > Anyways I was about 15 or 16 at the time and the new K1 line caught my eyes and ears. I returned the K5 for a K1m and then later sold that for a K1II. I wound up selling that for a new K4(of course). Then I ditched digital altogether for many years to focus on real pianos, B3's and many other heavy keyboards, but alas I still have a place in my mind that tells me that the K5 is magical. So I've wanted one to replace the one I returned 19-20 years ago. I no longer get to do much with the heavy keyboards anymore anyways. In fact I mainly play a Kawai MP8 stage piano and that's it.
            >
            > So I found a K5 on ebay that was advertised as fully functional. I paid $175 for it. It turns on and the lcd is not too dim. It even came with a ram card, but the thing has zero presets or stored patches. It makes a noise, but I'd have to program every thing anew just to have some useful sounds. Also, most of the buttons don't function unless I press them hard. What do I need to do with this to restore it? I don't want it to wind up in the basement collecting dust with my collection of vintage keyboards that have issues that cost too much to fix. Am I going to be able to play this thing? What do I need to do?
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------ --------- --------- ------
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >

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