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Re: [junkrig] junk rigged beach cat

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  • Victor Winterthun
    Hi Ray. Regarding your Dingy. The geometry of the sail has little to do with efficiency. Paralel battens are most practical when it comes to reefing, and it is
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 1, 2005
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      Hi Ray.

      Regarding your Dingy.

      The geometry of the sail has little to do with efficiency.
      Paralel battens are most practical when it comes to reefing, and it is for easy reefing we have the Chinese lug.
      The Hasler/McLeod sail neen a shorter mast than the Van Loan type for the same area.
      For this reasons, I would chose the Hasler/McLeod sail.

      To make the sail efficient, I would sew inn a litle camber in the panels. 6 to 8% of the cord.
      Distance between paralell battens ca. 2'.

      Victor
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Ray Aldridge
      To: junkrig@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, February 28, 2005 11:38 PM
      Subject: [junkrig] junk rigged beach cat


      I've been interested in junk rig for many years, ever since I first read about
      Hasler's Jester. Unfortunately, all the boats I've owned have been Bermudian
      and I never got around to converting one of them.

      I've built several small boats, but always to someone else's design. I'm
      planning to build from my own design soon, and since of all my boats my
      all-time favorite was an old Wharram catamaran (a 27' Tane) I'd like to build
      a trailerable beach cruising cat.

      I understand that multihulls are not generally thought to be appropriate for
      junk rig, because the high speeds bring the apparent wind forward and the
      junk rig is not as able to windward as Bermudian. But to paraphrase Dick
      Newick, everyone wants their boat to be fast, comfortable, and cheap-- and
      you can have two out of three. If you build a small cat to be cheap and
      comfortable but not particularly fast, the boat still has many advantages
      over a pocket monohull cruiser, in my opinion.

      To start out, I'm going to try a junk rig on an 11' dinghy I built a few years
      back-- Dave Gerr's Nester, which separates into two pieces for deck stowage.
      Here are my questions, and I'll be very grateful for any help. Is the
      Reddish rig definitely superior to windward, compared to the Hasler and Van
      Loan variants? Would the difference be worthwhile, compared to a Van Loan
      sail with camber built into the panels? How many lower panels are
      appropriate in a small dinghy sail (say 70 sq. ft?) And finally, does anyone
      know of a good tutorial for using the Sailcut8 program? I can't seem to
      figure out how to input specific values-- the slider bars are not labeled in
      the version I have, which I got just a few days ago. Also, there are no
      proportions on the panels output, so how do you use the output to cut a sail?

      If anyone on the list lives along the Northwest Florida gulf coast and sails
      with a junk rig, I'd sure like to talk to you about it.

      Thanks much,

      Ray






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    • rhaldridge
      Victor, thanks for the reply. I d probably prefer the Hasler/McLeod rig, as you recommend, because I understand the sheeting arrangements better-- there
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 1, 2005
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        Victor, thanks for the reply.

        I'd probably prefer the Hasler/McLeod rig, as you recommend, because I
        understand the sheeting arrangements better-- there doesn't seem to be
        any easily available diagram and description of the Reddish sheeting
        set-up. I would assume that Reddish disagrees with the idea that the
        geometry of the sail has little to do with efficiency, though he
        apparently believes in building a little camber into his panels these
        days. Probably I don't understand the theory of the sail, but isn't
        it that twist serves as camber?

        Thanks again-- it's really good to hear from folks whose knowledge
        comes from practical experience with the rig. Easy reefing is
        certainly a huge consideration for me.

        Ray





        --- In junkrig@yahoogroups.com, "Victor Winterthun"
        <victor.winterthun@c...> wrote:
        > Hi Ray.
        >
        > Regarding your Dingy.
        >
        > The geometry of the sail has little to do with efficiency.
        > Paralel battens are most practical when it comes to reefing, and it
        is for easy reefing we have the Chinese lug.
        > The Hasler/McLeod sail neen a shorter mast than the Van Loan type
        for the same area.
        > For this reasons, I would chose the Hasler/McLeod sail.
        >
        > To make the sail efficient, I would sew inn a litle camber in the
        panels. 6 to 8% of the cord.
        > Distance between paralell battens ca. 2'.
        >
        > Victor
      • Timothy Dunn
        It seems to me that hinges or cut rounds (quilting) in junk sails allow greater sail area, are simpler, and offer camber when well reefed. I think the jury is
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 1, 2005
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          It seems to me that hinges or cut rounds (quilting) in
          junk sails allow greater sail area, are simpler, and
          offer camber when well reefed. I think the jury is
          still out on the benefits of variations of creating
          camber right at the leach. I think the Reddish rig is
          obsolete in comparison, due to these advantages.

          Tim Dunn


          =====





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