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Re: [junkrig] Re: Camber versus hinge

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  • Victor Winterthun
    Sorry I was too tired last night, and got some names wrong. The name of the yacht is TYSTIE, and the owner: David Tyler. Victor ... From: Victor Winterthun
    Message 1 of 18 , May 1, 2003
      Sorry
      I was too tired last night, and got some names wrong.

      The name of the yacht is TYSTIE, and the owner: David Tyler.

      Victor
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Victor Winterthun" <victor.winterthun@...>
      To: <junkrig@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, April 30, 2003 11:03 PM
      Subject: Re: [junkrig] Re: Camber versus hinge


      > Hi Tim.
      > The battens are so vertical in the upper part of the sail, that when correct twisted, a horisontal wind will see a camber.
      > Look at the yacht TYSIE. Owned by Robert Tyler. There is a article about her in the last newsletter from Junk Rig Association.
      >
      > Victor
      >
    • Paul Stewart-Day
      Hi Tim, Re your request Did you notice the different compass directions when you tacked .. , today I did some more work on the conversion to flaps and took
      Message 2 of 18 , May 3, 2003
        Hi Tim,

        Re your request "Did you notice the different compass directions when
        you tacked ..", today I did some more work on the conversion to flaps
        and took out the boat on the harbour for about 4 rather frustrating
        hours, due to very light winds from near calms up to force 2 approx.
        My lowest batten is not yet hinged, but the next 3 are, and I have
        made the upper one rigid again as I forecast.

        In very light winds with fairly smooth water I was pointing 40
        degrees to windward (tacking through 80 degrees), with full sail.
        When the wind got up a little more, with the water a little choppy, I
        was pointing 45 degrees to windward (tacking through 90 degrees),
        usually, also under full sail. A few times I tacked through 100
        degrees in those conditions, but I think that was due to my lack of
        sailing experience with the altered rig. So its still early days yet
        but when I have hinged the lowest batten, within a few days I hope, I
        will take the time to teach myself how to optimally sail with the
        modified rig, do some more rigorous testing and report again.

        Best regards,

        Paul Stewart-Day
      • Tim Dunn
        Hi, Paul That s great! I assume your previous best was to tack through 100 degrees. That was my best on Batwing. Now that you mention it, we could use some
        Message 3 of 18 , May 3, 2003
          Hi, Paul

          That's great! I assume your previous best was to tack through 100 degrees. That was my best on Batwing. Now that you mention it, we could use some feedback about sheeting angles from members with cambered, hinged, or gurney flapped sails. Guys?

          Tim Dunn

          In very light winds with fairly smooth water I was pointing 40
          degrees to windward (tacking through 80 degrees), with full sail.
          When the wind got up a little more, with the water a little choppy, I
          was pointing 45 degrees to windward (tacking through 90 degrees),
          usually, also under full sail. A few times I tacked through 100
          degrees in those conditions, but I think that was due to my lack of
          sailing experience with the altered rig.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Paul Stewart-Day
          Hi Tim, Re: I assume your previous best was to tack through 100 degrees. Yes. Re: .. we could use some feedback about sheeting angles from members with
          Message 4 of 18 , May 3, 2003
            Hi Tim,

            Re: "I assume your previous best was to tack through 100 degrees."

            Yes.


            Re: ".. we could use some feedback about sheeting angles from members
            with cambered, hinged, or gurney flapped sails."

            Could you or someone with a little more knowledge than moi about how
            to express/enumerate sheeting angles, please tell me how to go about
            it? What I can say is that I am now sheeting in the sail several
            degrees closer to the centre line of my boat. I am still not sure how
            hard I should sheet in with the modified rig, that will be a trial
            and error process. Based on the small amount of harbour testing so
            far I suspect that, on my boat at least, the beating sheeting angle
            will vary depending on the amount of sail hoisted, the sea state, and
            the wind strength.

            I want to express my appreciation to all those members who have been
            contributing to the dialogues about improving JR windward
            performance. In particular I want to acknowledge the great help that
            Bernard Slotboom and Victor Winterthun have been in relation to the
            gurney flap discourse/research. Thanks to those members my boat is so
            effective to windward that I haven't used my motor since I started
            testing the modified rig. (Where I sail there are lots of headlands,
            and a couple of sharp bends in a river with surrounding hills to get
            to and from my mooring.)

            Best regards,

            Paul Stewart-Day
          • Tim Dunn
            Hi, Paul how to express/enumerate sheeting angles, please tell me how to go about it? What I can say is that I am now sheeting in the sail several degrees
            Message 5 of 18 , May 3, 2003
              Hi, Paul
              "how to express/enumerate sheeting angles, please tell me how to go about
              it? What I can say is that I am now sheeting in the sail several
              degrees closer to the centre line of my boat. "

              That'll do.

              "I want to express my appreciation to all those members who have been
              contributing to the dialogues about improving JR windward
              performance. In particular I want to acknowledge the great help that
              Bernard Slotboom and Victor Winterthun have been in relation to the
              gurney flap discourse/research."

              Hear Hear!

              Tim Dunn

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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