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stepable galvanized steel poles

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  • Mike Smith
    I have seen our local utility companies are using a hot dipped tapered steel pole that appears to be able to be hinged down to have the lighting fixtures
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 4, 2003
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      I have seen our local utility companies are using a hot dipped
      tapered steel pole that appears to be able to be hinged down to have
      the lighting fixtures maintained. This brings up the idea of being
      able to step the mast for extended cruising under power or storage.
      I like the idea of being able to get under some low bridges without a
      major drama. and it would open up the posibility of taking on some
      of the european canal systems or something like the intracoastal
      waterways in the USA.

      Mike Smith
      Adelaide, South Australia
    • Willem Schultink
      Mike, That sounds to me like a good idea, and one that I will be exploring in more depth when I finally get to building my own boat. I have plans and frames
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 4, 2003
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        Mike,

        That sounds to me like a good idea, and one that I will be exploring in more
        depth when I finally get to building my own boat. I have plans and frames
        for a Roberts Spray 33 in steel, which I plan to rig a a junk. I reckon you
        can design into a steel boat the strength needed to deck step an unstayed
        mast and build a sturdy tabernacle to hold it firm in a seaway. You can do
        this by taking mast supports down to the keel and then diagonally through
        bulkheads, etc to wherever the stress needs to be dispersed to. Any good
        engineer familiar with steel and the loads imposed on a mast in a seaway
        will be able to design it. Once a properly designed steel structure is fully
        welded in place it is virtually indestructible in its normal use.

        The tabernacle itself needs to be properly designed, of course, but that is
        also only an engineering problem. It can seem scary to have an unstayed
        mast deckstepped, but consider aeroplane wings, which take enormous
        stresses. They too are unstayed, which would have been considered foolhardy
        in the early days of aeroplane design. Now they support aeroplanes that
        weigh hundreds of tons. It was just an engineering problem that someone
        sorted out.

        I first thought about this whole issue of deckstepped mast when living in
        Perth, Western Australia. All boats moored on the Swan River have to pass
        under the traffic bridges at Fremantle. I was at the time building a 53 foot
        steel ketch, bermudan rigged. Both masts were deckstepped, and I could pass
        under the bridges with ease. I also noted with interest that Rolly Tasker's
        mighty ocean racer, Siska, with its 90 foot mast, was also able to fold it
        down to get under the bridges - though getting it down was quite an
        operation to watch! Rolly was a member of Royal Perth Yacht Club, which was
        way up the river.

        I still like the idea of the freedom of having deckstepped masts which can
        be folded down when it suits me, and I can see no reason why it can't be
        achieved with unstayed masts.

        Willem

        Websites that work! Clarity! Simplicity! Speed!
        www.willemzz.com
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Mike Smith" <dominoconsultant@...>
        To: <junkrig@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, March 05, 2003 9:50 AM
        Subject: [junkrig] stepable galvanized steel poles


        > I have seen our local utility companies are using a hot dipped
        > tapered steel pole that appears to be able to be hinged down to have
        > the lighting fixtures maintained. This brings up the idea of being
        > able to step the mast for extended cruising under power or storage.
        > I like the idea of being able to get under some low bridges without a
        > major drama. and it would open up the posibility of taking on some
        > of the european canal systems or something like the intracoastal
        > waterways in the USA.
        >
        > Mike Smith
        > Adelaide, South Australia
        >
        >
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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        >
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        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
      • Perry Phillips
        Mike, I agree! That s why I put a tabernacle on my little junk rigged West Wight Potter. I can t see why it couldn t be done for larger boats as well. Perry
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 4, 2003
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          Mike,

          I agree! That's why I put a tabernacle on my little junk rigged West Wight
          Potter. I can't see why it couldn't be done for larger boats as well.


          Perry Phillips
          C-Type WWP #44 "Bobber"
          Port Arthur, Texas
          http://home.gt.rr.com/bobberslog/


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