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Odyssey III

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  • philb_39
    Arne, Has your Odyssey III arrived? Do you have a new project? I have a sample along with some nylon fabric samples that arrived today. I like the Odyssey
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 1, 2011
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      Arne, Has your Odyssey III arrived? Do you have a new project? I have a sample along with some nylon fabric samples that arrived today. I like the Odyssey features a lot. I'm not sure if it's too heavy for a sail with lower panels that will be about 2 inches wider (26in) than those on Broremann's sail. I'm wondering if panels that narrow will draw well with the Odyssey and if I did use it, should I go to a wider panel (close to 3 ft) with 3 rather than 4 lower panels. Of course I can't argue with the successful use of nylon. My boat is 16 feet with a very shallow keel, a disp. of 1100# and no ocean crossings planned. - Phil
    • Arne Kverneland, Norway
      Stavanger Wed. 20110202 Yes, the Odyssey III arrived a couple of weeks ago. It feels and weighs much the same as the blue coated rip-stop-woven nylon that was
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 2, 2011
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        Stavanger Wed. 20110202

        Yes, the Odyssey III arrived a couple of weeks ago. It feels and weighs much the same as the blue coated rip-stop-woven nylon that was used on Malena, Johanna and Samson.

        I guess the Odyssey is a bit on the thick side for a dinghy's sail. You should look for something in the 4oz range. I would rather do that than reducing the number of panels. I find that dividing a junk sail into 6-8 panels (instead of 3-5), gives better control. The luffs get shorter so need less tension to stay straight, and each panel makes a smaller reef which lets you fine-adjust the area better to the conditions. Remember, since reefing is so quick and easy, there is no reasons to reef away a third of the sail in one go.
        Broremann's sail cloth is somewhere around 4-5oz and very soft. If I had not stumbled over that cloth at the local sail makers, I guess I would have used some light polyethylene tarpaulin.

        Arne

        PS: If Odyssey was the only stuff I had, then I still would have used it for a dinghy. It will just take a bit more wind to inflate the panels... a wind Force 3 minus instead of 2 is my wild guess.





        --- In junkrig@yahoogroups.com, "philb_39" <philb_39@...> wrote:
        >
        > Arne, Has your Odyssey III arrived? Do you have a new project? I have a sample along with some nylon fabric samples that arrived today. I like the Odyssey features a lot. I'm not sure if it's too heavy for a sail with lower panels that will be about 2 inches wider (26in) than those on Broremann's sail. I'm wondering if panels that narrow will draw well with the Odyssey and if I did use it, should I go to a wider panel (close to 3 ft) with 3 rather than 4 lower panels. Of course I can't argue with the successful use of nylon. My boat is 16 feet with a very shallow keel, a disp. of 1100# and no ocean crossings planned. - Phil
        >
      • sailor1939
        Hi. Why not use rip stop nylon ment for spinnakers on junk rigged dinghys. The stretch in the material is minimal, so you may use the lightest there are.
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 2, 2011
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          Hi.

          Why not use rip stop nylon ment for spinnakers on junk rigged dinghys.
          The stretch in the material is minimal, so you may use the lightest there are.

          Victor

          --- In junkrig@yahoogroups.com, "Arne Kverneland, Norway" <arkverne@...> wrote:
          >
          > Stavanger Wed. 20110202
          >
          > Yes, the Odyssey III arrived a couple of weeks ago. It feels and weighs much the same as the blue coated rip-stop-woven nylon that was used on Malena, Johanna and Samson.
          >
          > I guess the Odyssey is a bit on the thick side for a dinghy's sail. You should look for something in the 4oz range. I would rather do that than reducing the number of panels. I find that dividing a junk sail into 6-8 panels (instead of 3-5), gives better control. The luffs get shorter so need less tension to stay straight, and each panel makes a smaller reef which lets you fine-adjust the area better to the conditions. Remember, since reefing is so quick and easy, there is no reasons to reef away a third of the sail in one go.
          > Broremann's sail cloth is somewhere around 4-5oz and very soft. If I had not stumbled over that cloth at the local sail makers, I guess I would have used some light polyethylene tarpaulin.
          >
          > Arne
          >
          > PS: If Odyssey was the only stuff I had, then I still would have used it for a dinghy. It will just take a bit more wind to inflate the panels... a wind Force 3 minus instead of 2 is my wild guess.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In junkrig@yahoogroups.com, "philb_39" <philb_39@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Arne, Has your Odyssey III arrived? Do you have a new project? I have a sample along with some nylon fabric samples that arrived today. I like the Odyssey features a lot. I'm not sure if it's too heavy for a sail with lower panels that will be about 2 inches wider (26in) than those on Broremann's sail. I'm wondering if panels that narrow will draw well with the Odyssey and if I did use it, should I go to a wider panel (close to 3 ft) with 3 rather than 4 lower panels. Of course I can't argue with the successful use of nylon. My boat is 16 feet with a very shallow keel, a disp. of 1100# and no ocean crossings planned. - Phil
          > >
          >
        • vakaman7
          I m thinking about the same thing. In the 100 sq ft size, the panels are small enough that the stretch might be minimal. I guess I ll have to make one to
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 2, 2011
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            I'm thinking about the same thing. In the 100 sq ft size, the panels are small enough that the stretch might be minimal. I guess I'll have to make one to find out.

            Gary

            --- In junkrig@yahoogroups.com, "sailor1939" <vicwin2009@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi.
            >
            > Why not use rip stop nylon ment for spinnakers on junk rigged dinghys.
            > The stretch in the material is minimal, so you may use the lightest there are.
            >
            > Victor
          • philb_39
            I appreciate the advice and food for thought. I just ordered enough 3.75 OZ coated nylon for a 132 Ft2 sail. I have several samples of 1.9 OZ coated and
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 2, 2011
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              I appreciate the advice and food for thought. I just ordered enough 3.75 OZ coated nylon for a 132 Ft2 sail. I have several samples of 1.9 OZ coated and uncoated ripstop, heaviest I could find. The silicone coated 1.9 OZ stuff just would not tear even after staring a cut with scissors. It was a small sample without much gripping room but it was much tougher than the un and urethane coated material of the same weight. I wondered about chafe and general wear with the 1.9, although batten pockets can be reinforced particularly at the mast. Anyway my boat gets to a point and stiffens up fairly well at 1100 lbs with 450 lbs in the keel and I went with the toughest of the heavier non ripstop choices I had. It's got to be better than a flour sack. As you point out, Gary, narrow panels should help keep any stretch in proportion. - Phil, converting a Com-pac 16


              --- In junkrig@yahoogroups.com, "vakaman7" <garyd@...> wrote:
              >
              > I'm thinking about the same thing. In the 100 sq ft size, the panels are small enough that the stretch might be minimal. I guess I'll have to make one to find out.
              >
              > Gary
              >
              > --- In junkrig@yahoogroups.com, "sailor1939" <vicwin2009@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Hi.
              > >
              > > Why not use rip stop nylon ment for spinnakers on junk rigged dinghys.
              > > The stretch in the material is minimal, so you may use the lightest there are.
              > >
              > > Victor
              >
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