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Re: [json] Re: json date format 2006-12-03T13:56:21

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  • Peter Michaux
    ... Douglas, is there a particular reason for not including milliseconds in json.js? Thanks, Peter -- Fork JavaScript: http://forkjavascript.org
    Message 1 of 12 , Jan 6, 2007
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      On 12/4/06, Peter Michaux <petermichaux@...> wrote:
      >
      > This is what I was thinking. Milliseconds could be important at times
      > and seems unfortunate to throw them out if there is no reason.

      Douglas, is there a particular reason for not including milliseconds in json.js?

      Thanks,
      Peter
      --
      Fork JavaScript: http://forkjavascript.org
    • Douglas Crockford
      ... in json.js? You have the source, you can put them in any time you want to. But first, let me ask you a question: How confident that your system s clock has
      Message 2 of 12 , Jan 6, 2007
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        > Douglas, is there a particular reason for not including milliseconds
        in json.js?

        You have the source, you can put them in any time you want to. But
        first, let me ask you a question: How confident that your system's
        clock has millisecond accuracy? And that the latency of the OS +
        Browser + JavaScript will not cause significant drift by the time it
        is delivered to your application? How meaningful will the milliseconds
        be when you put them on the wire and send them to your server, whose
        clock is not in sync with yours? Milliseconds are a waste of time.

        There are applications, such as video editing, where subsecond
        accuracy is important. If you have such an application, then you would
        want to tack on frames or fractional seconds. If you don't really need
        it, then it is better to not deceive yourself with false precision.
      • Peter Michaux
        ... I m sorry for bothering you, sir. Thank you for your answer. I ll go back to my corner now. Peter
        Message 3 of 12 , Jan 6, 2007
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          On 1/6/07, Douglas Crockford <douglas@...> wrote:
          >
          > > Douglas, is there a particular reason for not including milliseconds
          > in json.js?
          >
          > You have the source, you can put them in any time you want to. But
          > first, let me ask you a question: How confident that your system's
          > clock has millisecond accuracy? And that the latency of the OS +
          > Browser + JavaScript will not cause significant drift by the time it
          > is delivered to your application? How meaningful will the milliseconds
          > be when you put them on the wire and send them to your server, whose
          > clock is not in sync with yours? Milliseconds are a waste of time.

          I'm sorry for bothering you, sir. Thank you for your answer. I'll go
          back to my corner now.

          Peter
        • Peter Michaux
          ... A date object is not necessarily constructed with no arguments sent to the Date constructor. It could very well be that in some applications the
          Message 4 of 12 , Jan 10, 2007
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            On 1/6/07, Douglas Crockford <douglas@...> wrote:
            >
            > > Douglas, is there a particular reason for not including milliseconds
            > in json.js?
            >
            > You have the source, you can put them in any time you want to. But
            > first, let me ask you a question: How confident that your system's
            > clock has millisecond accuracy? And that the latency of the OS +
            > Browser + JavaScript will not cause significant drift by the time it
            > is delivered to your application? How meaningful will the milliseconds
            > be when you put them on the wire and send them to your server, whose
            > clock is not in sync with yours? Milliseconds are a waste of time.

            A date object is not necessarily constructed with no arguments sent to
            the Date constructor. It could very well be that in some applications
            the construction of the Date object could use date data from a user
            input which has very accurate and critical milliseconds information
            from another very accurate system.

            Peter
          • geoffreyk00
            ... milliseconds ... But ... system s ... time it ... milliseconds ... whose ... time. ... sent to ... applications ... The date object may be historical data
            Message 5 of 12 , Jan 11, 2007
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              --- In json@yahoogroups.com, "Peter Michaux" <petermichaux@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > On 1/6/07, Douglas Crockford <douglas@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > > Douglas, is there a particular reason for not including
              milliseconds
              > > in json.js?
              > >
              > > You have the source, you can put them in any time you want to.
              But
              > > first, let me ask you a question: How confident that your
              system's
              > > clock has millisecond accuracy? And that the latency of the OS +
              > > Browser + JavaScript will not cause significant drift by the
              time it
              > > is delivered to your application? How meaningful will the
              milliseconds
              > > be when you put them on the wire and send them to your server,
              whose
              > > clock is not in sync with yours? Milliseconds are a waste of
              time.
              >
              > A date object is not necessarily constructed with no arguments
              sent to
              > the Date constructor. It could very well be that in some
              applications
              > the construction of the Date object could use date data from a user
              > input which has very accurate and critical milliseconds information
              > from another very accurate system.
              >
              > Peter
              >

              The date object may be historical data that truly is millisecond-
              accurate. The object does not have to be constructed when the
              dataset is created or by the server that is delivering the dataset.
              I more likely will have been created long before, with many date
              objects that do need this level of accuracy.

              I can see no reason to not to include milliseconds, and many reasons
              to keep them.
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