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First two characters of a JSON text will always be ASCII

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  • Atif Aziz
    In Section 3 (Encoding) of the JSON Internet Draft, the second paragraphs starts by saying, Since the first two characters of a JSON text will always be ASCII
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 17, 2006
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      In Section 3 (Encoding) of the JSON Internet Draft, the second
      paragraphs starts by saying, "Since the first two characters of a JSON
      text will always be ASCII characters [RFC-0020], ...." Does this really
      mean that every JSON text encoder must emit a space at the start of JSON
      text? The grammar doesn't reflect this rule, so is this just mere
      guidance or is there some discrepancy here? I don't think it's the
      former due to use of the word "always." I'd appreciate if someone could
      help clarify this bit. Thanks.



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Michal Migurski
      ... I m guessing this is because of the object-or-array rules discussed here last week. In other words, a JSON text must start with [ or { , which are both
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 17, 2006
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        On Jul 17, 2006, at 2:50 PM, Atif Aziz wrote:
        > In Section 3 (Encoding) of the JSON Internet Draft, the second
        > paragraphs starts by saying, "Since the first two characters of a JSON
        > text will always be ASCII characters [RFC-0020], ...." Does this
        > really
        > mean that every JSON text encoder must emit a space at the start of
        > JSON
        > text? The grammar doesn't reflect this rule, so is this just mere
        > guidance or is there some discrepancy here? I don't think it's the
        > former due to use of the word "always." I'd appreciate if someone
        > could
        > help clarify this bit. Thanks.
        I'm guessing this is because of the object-or-array rules discussed
        here last week. In other words, a JSON text must start with '[' or
        '{', which are both ASCII, followed by 'n(ull)', 'f(alse)', 't
        (true)', a digit, or quotes to open a string. All of these are also
        ASCII.

        -mike.

        ----------------------------------------------------------------
        michal migurski- contact info and pgp key:
        sf/ca http://mike.teczno.com/contact.html
      • Atif Aziz
        Michal, thanks for the explanation. It all makes sense now, especially after re-reading it with a fresher mind this morning. (whisper) Truth be told, I was
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 18, 2006
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          Michal, thanks for the explanation. It all makes sense now, especially
          after re-reading it with a fresher mind this morning.

          (whisper) Truth be told, I was completely misreading the 0020 bit and
          interpreting it as ASCII space rather than an RFC document number even
          though it was right there in my face (dope slap). It's odd, though, to
          see a low RFC document number expressed with leading zeros, which is
          what threw me off since I'd been reading a lot of the U+XXXX notation
          lately.


          --- In json@yahoogroups.com, Michal Migurski <mike-jsonphp@...> wrote:
          >
          > On Jul 17, 2006, at 2:50 PM, Atif Aziz wrote:
          > > In Section 3 (Encoding) of the JSON Internet Draft, the second
          > > paragraphs starts by saying, "Since the first two characters of a
          JSON
          > > text will always be ASCII characters [RFC-0020], ...." Does this
          > > really
          > > mean that every JSON text encoder must emit a space at the start of
          > > JSON
          > > text? The grammar doesn't reflect this rule, so is this just mere
          > > guidance or is there some discrepancy here? I don't think it's the
          > > former due to use of the word "always." I'd appreciate if someone
          > > could
          > > help clarify this bit. Thanks.
          > I'm guessing this is because of the object-or-array rules discussed
          > here last week. In other words, a JSON text must start with '[' or
          > '{', which are both ASCII, followed by 'n(ull)', 'f(alse)', 't
          > (true)', a digit, or quotes to open a string. All of these are also
          > ASCII.
          >
          > -mike.
          >
          > ----------------------------------------------------------------
          > michal migurski- contact info and pgp key:
          > sf/ca http://mike.teczno.com/contact.html
          >
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