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Breakfast and lunch

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  • Jonathan
    As I redo my meal list, I find that I have too many breakfasts that are all variations of instant oatmeal or couscous, and that my lunches mostly consist of
    Message 1 of 28 , Feb 22, 2010
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      As I redo my meal list, I find that I have too many breakfasts that are all variations of instant oatmeal or couscous, and that my lunches mostly consist of "Gorp+String Cheese+clif bar". While some of these are good, I'm not so certain that I'll want to be eating that for my entire 20 day adventure. I'm sure that the 700+ members here could provide me with some taste-bud-exciting breakfasts and lunches, right?
    • Randy Forsland
      I like rice pudding in the morning....Very easy and a nice break from oatmeal and such.. Try this site for recipes.. http://onepanwonders.com/ Redwood PS: I m
      Message 2 of 28 , Feb 22, 2010
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        I like rice pudding in the morning....Very easy and a nice break from oatmeal and such..

        Try this site for recipes..

        http://onepanwonders.com/

        Redwood

        PS: I'm hiking a modified JMT this summer...taking the Sierra High Route from Twin Lakes to Reds meadow and then joining the JMT there..leaving 8/16..

        On Mon, Feb 22, 2010 at 4:06 PM, Jonathan <jonnyboy9543@...> wrote:
         

        As I redo my meal list, I find that I have too many breakfasts that are all variations of instant oatmeal or couscous, and that my lunches mostly consist of "Gorp+String Cheese+clif bar". While some of these are good, I'm not so certain that I'll want to be eating that for my entire 20 day adventure. I'm sure that the 700+ members here could provide me with some taste-bud-exciting breakfasts and lunches, right?


      • ed_rodriguez52@yahoo.com
        Hi Jonathan, found this is the book The Well-fed backpacker by June Fleming, Sunrise Spuds 1 2 cup instant potato, 1 tablespoon instant dry milk, 1 teaspoon
        Message 3 of 28 , Feb 22, 2010
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          Hi Jonathan, found this is the book The Well-fed backpacker by June Fleming, Sunrise Spuds 1\2 cup instant potato, 1 tablespoon instant dry milk, 1 teaspoon butter (different ways to go with this) for meat you can put bacon bits or salami. 1\2 cup water. Enjoy

          Sent on the Sprint® Now Network from my BlackBerry®


          From: "Jonathan" <jonnyboy9543@...>
          Date: Tue, 23 Feb 2010 00:06:04 -0000
          To: <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com>
          Subject: [John Muir Trail] Breakfast and lunch

           

          As I redo my meal list, I find that I have too many breakfasts that are all variations of instant oatmeal or couscous, and that my lunches mostly consist of "Gorp+String Cheese+clif bar". While some of these are good, I'm not so certain that I'll want to be eating that for my entire 20 day adventure. I'm sure that the 700+ members here could provide me with some taste-bud-exciting breakfasts and lunches, right?

        • hmdsierra
          When my son and I did our trip we ran into a fellow who had been our a month or more. He said he carried oatmeal for breakfast and rice for dinner, every day.
          Message 4 of 28 , Feb 22, 2010
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            When my son and I did our trip we ran into a fellow who had been our a month or more. He said he carried oatmeal for breakfast and rice for dinner, every day. He was probably ready to eat a tree for variety.

            --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Jonathan" <jonnyboy9543@...> wrote:
            >
            > As I redo my meal list, I find that I have too many breakfasts that are all variations of instant oatmeal or couscous, and that my lunches mostly consist of "Gorp+String Cheese+clif bar". While some of these are good, I'm not so certain that I'll want to be eating that for my entire 20 day adventure. I'm sure that the 700+ members here could provide me with some taste-bud-exciting breakfasts and lunches, right?
            >
          • heartfire144
            Carnation instant breakfast and if you want to add milk to it use NIdo whole milk powder. I have found that cream of wheat (not instant) pretty much
            Message 5 of 28 , Feb 23, 2010
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              Carnation instant breakfast and if you want to add milk to it use NIdo whole milk powder.

              I have found that cream of wheat (not instant) pretty much 'instantly' cooks with just adding boiling water and let soak for a few minutes.

              Do you have a dehydrator? I've made green smoothies for breakfast - blenderize kale with a little water, add some instant oatmeal, a handful of sunflower seeds, some honey or brown sugar and what ever else pleases you (some flax seed etc) and dehydrate that.

              Lunches
              These are NOT my recipes, I found them on line, I THINK they are attributed to Linda Frederick Yaffee - "Backpacker Gourmet"

              - Packer's Cole Slaw
              1 tablespoon noniodized or canning salt
              1 cup water
              1/2 cabbage, washed and finely shredded
              1 stalk celery, shredded
              1 carrot, shredded
              1/2 green pepper, shredded
              3/4 cup vinegar
              1 teaspoon mustard seed
              1/2 teaspoon celery seed
              1 cup sugar
              At home: Dissolve the salt in the water in a large bowl, then soak the cabbage in the salt water for an hour. Add the next three ingredients and let them soak for another 20 minutes, then drain and rinse thoroughly. Meanwhile, combine the vinegar, mustard seed, celery seed, and sugar in a pan and bring it to a boil, stirring until the sugar is dissolved. Pour the dressing over the rinsed vegetable mixture in the bowl and marinate, covered, for at least 24 hours before dehydrating. Divide the dried slaw into plastic bags (1/3 cup of dried salad is adequate as a side dish for one person).
              In camp: Add an equal amount of water to each portion of salad (1/3 cup of water to 1/3 cup of salad) and allow it to reconstitute for at least half an hour. Yield: 3 1/2 to 4 cups (10 to 12 side dishes).
              Carrot-Pineapple Crunch
              1 large lemon's peel, grated
              1 cup sugar
              1/2 cup lemon juice
              4 large carrots, peeled and shredded
              1 8-ounce can crushed pineapple, drained
              1 tablespoon toasted slivered almonds
              At home: Stir the lemon zest and sugar into the lemon juice in a pan and simmer gently until the sugar is dissolved. Put the carrots and pineapple in a bowl, pour the juice mixture over them, cover the bowl, and marinate for at least 24 hours before drying. Package the dried mix in zipper-lock bags (1/3 cup of dried salad will make side dishes for two people). Package the almonds separately.
              In camp: Add an equal amount of water to each portion of salad (1/3 cup of water to 1/3 cup of salad) and allow to reconstitute for at least half an hour, then add almonds. Yield: 1 cup (6 side dishes).


              Mexi-Bean Salad
              1 tablespoon minced cilantro
              1/2 teaspoon salt
              1 tablespoon vinegar
              1/3 cup salsa
              1 15-ounce can kidney beans, rinsed and drained
              1 cup frozen corn, thawed
              1/2 bell pepper, sliced into strips
              2 scallions, chopped
              At home: Stir the cilantro, salt, and vinegar into the salsa in a large bowl. Add the remaining ingredients, stir, cover the bowl, and marinate for at least 24 hours before drying. The salad is done when the beans are crunchy and the corn is still a bit leathery. Place a single serving (1/4 cup) of the dried mix in each zipper-lock bag.
              In camp: Add an equal amount of water to each portion of salad (1/4 cup of water to 1/4 cup of salad) and allow it to reconstitute for at least 1 hour. Use as a side salad or as filling for a vegetable burrito-just add cheese. Yield: 1 1/2 to 2 cups (6 to 8 side dishes).
              Oriental Cabbage Salad
              1/4 cup vinegar
              1 cup sugar
              1/2 teaspoon salt
              1/2 cup vegetable oil
              1/4 cup soy sauce
              1 large Chinese cabbage, shredded
              1 bunch scallions, white bulb discarded, chopped
              1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds
              1 tablespoon toasted slivered almonds
              At home: Mix the vinegar, sugar, salt, oil, and soy sauce in a bowl and stir until the sugar is dissolved. Place the cabbage and scallions in a bowl, pour the marinade over them, and toss to thoroughly coat the vegetables. Marinate for 24 to 36 hours, then dehydrate. Package a single serving (1/4 cup) of the dried mix in each zipper-lock bag. Pack the sesame seeds and almonds in a separate bag.
              In camp: Add 1/8 cup of water to 1/4 cup of dried mix and let it soak for at least half an hour. Sprinkle with the sesame seeds and almonds just before serving. Yield: 1 1/2 to 2 cups (6 to 8 side dishes).





              Zucchini-Apple Salad
              1/4 cup lemon juice
              1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
              2 tablespoons sugar
              1 large zucchini, shredded
              1 large apple, cored and shredded
              At home: Combine the lemon juice, ginger, and sugar in a bowl and stir until the sugar dissolves. Place the zucchini and apple in another bowl, pour the juice mixture over them, cover, and marinate for at least 24 hours before dehydrating. Package a single serving (1/3 cup) of the dried salad in each zipper-lock bag.
              In camp: Add 1/3 cup of water to 1/3 cup of salad and allow it to reconstitute for at least half an hour. Yield: 1 to 1 1/3 cups (4 side dishes).


              Also for lunch (again if you have a dehydrator) and essentially from the book mentioned above,

              A can of white beans, a can of tuna, seasoning to taste, blenderize it, dry it, make it into a powder and then on the trail mix with cold water about one hr before lunch, keep hiking and when you stop at lunch time, eat with crackers, pita chips etc.

              If you don't eat tuna, a can of chick peas, some peanutbutter and seasonings to your liking. this is Peanutbutter hummus and is really good. these are very high protein lunches that willhelp you to keep walking all afternoon.

              Judy
            • Gary A.
              One of my favorites: 1/2 cup of your fav granola 1/2 dry milk pinch of brown sugar hand full of freeze dried fruit (i get mine in the kiddy foods) put it in a
              Message 6 of 28 , Feb 23, 2010
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                One of my favorites:

                1/2 cup of your fav granola
                1/2 dry milk
                pinch of brown sugar
                hand full of freeze dried fruit (i get mine in the kiddy foods)

                put it in a ziplock bag

                add about 3/4 cup of water when ready to eat & eat it right out of the ziplock bag. No Cook ,No Mess!!

                I have found this to be an excellent breakfast, lunch or easy snack.

                Just my thoughts,
                Gary A.




                --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Jonathan" <jonnyboy9543@...> wrote:
                >
                > As I redo my meal list, I find that I have too many breakfasts that are all variations of instant oatmeal or couscous, and that my lunches mostly consist of "Gorp+String Cheese+clif bar". While some of these are good, I'm not so certain that I'll want to be eating that for my entire 20 day adventure. I'm sure that the 700+ members here could provide me with some taste-bud-exciting breakfasts and lunches, right?
                >
              • Roleigh Martin
                No protein or fat? I hope to God there was more in his diet. One can survive on a carb-free diet (traditional Eskimo diet), but one can not survive on a
                Message 7 of 28 , Feb 23, 2010
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                  No protein or fat?  I hope to God there was more in his diet.  One can survive on a carb-free diet (traditional Eskimo diet), but one can not survive on a protein-free, fat-free diet.

                  On Tue, Feb 23, 2010 at 12:59 AM, hmdsierra <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                   

                  When my son and I did our trip we ran into a fellow who had been our a month or more. He said he carried oatmeal for breakfast and rice for dinner, every day. He was probably ready to eat a tree for variety.


                  --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Jonathan" <jonnyboy9543@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > As I redo my meal list, I find that I have too many breakfasts that are all variations of instant oatmeal or couscous, and that my lunches mostly consist of "Gorp+String Cheese+clif bar". While some of these are good, I'm not so certain that I'll want to be eating that for my entire 20 day adventure. I'm sure that the 700+ members here could provide me with some taste-bud-exciting breakfasts and lunches, right?
                  >


                • Peter Burke
                  ... rice contains protein http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/cereal-grains-and-pasta/5716/2 quick oats contain protein and fat
                  Message 8 of 28 , Feb 23, 2010
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                    On 2/23/2010 9:21 AM, Roleigh Martin wrote:  

                    No protein or fat?  I hope to God there was more in his diet.  One can survive on a carb-free diet (traditional Eskimo diet), but one can not survive on a protein-free, fat-free diet.

                    rice contains protein
                    http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/cereal-grains-and-pasta/5716/2

                    quick oats contain protein and fat
                    http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/breakfast-cereals/7298/2


                  • jmaddog1082@charter.net
                    To break the monotony of oatmeal, I use the Krusteaz brand pancake mix for a treat. Ideally, this requires a small, lightweight frying pan (Target $4.99,
                    Message 9 of 28 , Feb 23, 2010
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                      To break the monotony of oatmeal, I use the Krusteaz brand pancake mix for a treat. Ideally, this requires a small, lightweight frying pan (Target $4.99, about 6oz after removing the unecessary handle). The Krusteaz brand is just add water, so I prepare portions in Zip-Locs to add water later. It's a very fine powder, so it packs very dense with low volume. Mix in bag, tear off a tip of the bag's corner, then squeeze into the pan like a pastry tube (or whatever that thing's called).

                      To avoid the sticky clean-up associated with syrup on a plate, I just roll the pancakes like a tortilla and drizzle the syrup onto the end as I eat it by hand. Use syrup packets (not tubs) from your favorite fast food breakfast stop.

                      Enjoy but don't forget to share some with your now envious, oatmeal chompin' trail mates.

                      J
                      ---- Jonathan <jonnyboy9543@...> wrote:
                      > As I redo my meal list, I find that I have too many breakfasts that are all variations of instant oatmeal or couscous, and that my lunches mostly consist of "Gorp+String Cheese+clif bar". While some of these are good, I'm not so certain that I'll want to be eating that for my entire 20 day adventure. I'm sure that the 700+ members here could provide me with some taste-bud-exciting breakfasts and lunches, right?
                      >
                    • Roleigh Martin
                      A ratio balance of essential protein amino acids are required to be able to provide dietary protein. The book, Diet for a Small Planet, went into great detail
                      Message 10 of 28 , Feb 23, 2010
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                        A ratio balance of essential protein amino acids are required to be able to provide dietary protein.  The book, Diet for a Small Planet, went into great detail in this -- their first edition erred in thinking  the carb-source of protein was worthless if not ratio'ed right and later stated that in massive quantities a small portion of it provided some dietary protein.  Terribly, terribly inefficient to do it this way, and not health, unless you balance the sources in certain ways (per the book).
                         
                        Same with fat, there are certain Essential Fatty Acids needed and without them after 60 days, life is threatened.  Any type of fat does not count.  Some of the books on the Zone Diet or Protein Power go into the biochemistry requirements. 

                        On Tue, Feb 23, 2010 at 9:27 AM, Peter Burke <pburke@...> wrote:
                         

                        On 2/23/2010 9:21 AM, Roleigh Martin wrote:

                        No protein or fat?  I hope to God there was more in his diet.  One can survive on a carb-free diet (traditional Eskimo diet), but one can not survive on a protein-free, fat-free diet.

                        rice contains protein
                        http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/cereal-grains-and-pasta/5716/2

                        quick oats contain protein and fat
                        http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/breakfast-cereals/7298/2
                      • medici95014
                        No, I had oatmeal for breakfast (different flavors) and jerky/cheese/crackers/potato stix for lunch every day for the month I was on the trail for both JMT
                        Message 11 of 28 , Feb 23, 2010
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                          No, I had oatmeal for breakfast (different flavors) and jerky/cheese/crackers/potato stix for lunch every day for
                          the month I was on the trail for both JMT trips.
                          Breakfast is a semi-conscious event anyway.
                          Didn't get boring or tasteless. Dinner was variety.

                          Pete

                          --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, hmdsierra <no_reply@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > When my son and I did our trip we ran into a fellow who had been our a month or more. He said he carried oatmeal for breakfast and rice for dinner, every day. He was probably ready to eat a tree for variety.
                          >
                          > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Jonathan" <jonnyboy9543@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > As I redo my meal list, I find that I have too many breakfasts that are all variations of instant oatmeal or couscous, and that my lunches mostly consist of "Gorp+String Cheese+clif bar". While some of these are good, I'm not so certain that I'll want to be eating that for my entire 20 day adventure. I'm sure that the 700+ members here could provide me with some taste-bud-exciting breakfasts and lunches, right?
                          > >
                          >
                        • Peter Burke
                          You know, a friend of mine did a JMT eating almost nothing (the true ultralight way of doing it) and he s just fine. He kept laughing at my food planning and
                          Message 12 of 28 , Feb 23, 2010
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                            You know, a friend of mine did a JMT eating almost nothing (the true ultralight way of doing it) and he's just fine. He kept laughing at my food planning and pretty much lives by the motto that fasting for 10 days on occasion isn't a bad thing for you. Also solves your bear canister choice dilemma. Terribly inefficient is relative, and even our 2010 north-south-north yo-yo is going to take far less than 60 days. Thing is, I usually am healthier after such a journey than before I started, even though I could care less about essential fatty acids and dietary protein ratios...

                            I bring food based on the following base rules, in the order listed

                            - non perishable without refrigeration
                            - like to eat
                            - high calories to weight ratio
                            - low pack volume to calorie ratio
                            - low or no cooking time (nothing over boil +2 min simmer comes along)
                            - variety
                            - mineral/vitamin/dietary balance


                            I usually get a full meal at various locations along the trail, which is when above rules do not apply - it's "eat as much as you can" time.  Those places are all the warm food options (TM, Reds, VVR, Portal) and each time the resupply box is opened and stuff doesn't have to be carried beyond the pickup location.

                            Another base rule - never bring anything you haven't eaten and at home before. Don't like it at home, you won't like it on the trail.


                            On 2/23/2010 10:48 AM, Roleigh Martin wrote:  
                            A ratio balance of essential protein amino acids are required to be able to provide dietary protein.  The book, Diet for a Small Planet, went into great detail in this -- their first edition erred in thinking  the carb-source of protein was worthless if not ratio'ed right and later stated that in massive quantities a small portion of it provided some dietary protein.  Terribly, terribly inefficient to do it this way, and not health, unless you balance the sources in certain ways (per the book).
                             
                            Same with fat, there are certain Essential Fatty Acids needed and without them after 60 days, life is threatened.  Any type of fat does not count.  Some of the books on the Zone Diet or Protein Power go into the biochemistry requirements. 

                          • Roleigh Martin
                            Peter, you hike the JMT in 10 days -- my hat s off to you. That is really trekking. How old are you, may I ask?
                            Message 13 of 28 , Feb 23, 2010
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                              Peter, you hike the JMT in 10 days -- my hat's off to you.  That is really trekking.  How old are you, may I ask?

                            • Peter Burke
                              ... I did it in 9 days in 1990 and we exited further south at Horseshoe Meadows instead of the portal (do not recommend that alternate unless you like
                              Message 14 of 28 , Feb 23, 2010
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                                On 2/23/2010 1:23 PM, Roleigh Martin wrote:  

                                Peter, you hike the JMT in 10 days -- my hat's off to you.  That is really trekking.  How old are you, may I ask?

                                I did it in 9 days in 1990 and we exited further south at Horseshoe Meadows instead of the portal (do not recommend that alternate unless you like beach-walking at 11,000 feet).  I  was 27 that summer and it was the third JMT for me. Nowadays I go with my kids and take my time since their legs aren't long enough to go that fast, although they did surprise me with a 20 mile day last summer. Back in the late 80s and early 90s, I did all my JMTs under 14 days "taking my time. This year, I am looking at up to 39 days on the trail for the yo-yo with my kids, taking it super easy on the first 100 miles, which I think was a bit harsh last summer when we first tried it. We'll take 19-20 days south, and 19 north, or something along those lines. I don't plan to be home for 7 weeks at least.





                              • Todd Sharp
                                Hey Peter, glad your clan is giving it another shot this year. You better watch it, it will be soon enough that Damien and Claire will be telling you to catch
                                Message 15 of 28 , Feb 23, 2010
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                                  Hey Peter, glad your clan is giving it another shot this year. You better watch it, it will be soon enough that Damien and Claire will be telling you to catch up.
                                   
                                  Are you going to do a JMT yo-yo site this year?

                                • Peter Burke
                                  ... I ll do a new site for 2010 - we are still in the early planning stages, but we ll probably start with what we have and go from there. Probably no video
                                  Message 16 of 28 , Feb 23, 2010
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                                    On 2/23/2010 2:58 PM, Todd Sharp wrote:
                                     


                                    Hey Peter, glad your clan is giving it another shot this year. You better watch it, it will be soon enough that Damien and Claire will be telling you to catch up.
                                     
                                    Are you going to do a JMT yo-yo site this year?


                                    I'll do a new site for 2010 - we are still in the early planning stages, but we'll probably start with what we have and go from there. Probably no video camera this time.  I think this year I'll still be able to keep up, but they are growing up so fast - need new rain gear and shoes for them again...




                                  • hmdsierra
                                    I ve always had pancakes in my breakfast list. Often have the blueberry ones. I add powdered egg to the ones that need it. However, I use honey rather than
                                    Message 17 of 28 , Feb 23, 2010
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                                      I've always had pancakes in my breakfast list. Often have the blueberry ones. I add powdered egg to the ones that need it. However, I use honey rather than syrup. One of the best times was when my son and I were in Cascade Valley, after dropping down from Purple Lk. We had the blueberry and were able to add a handful of wild strawberries to the mix. That was the only time I was able to gather so many of the strawberries. While hiking the entire JMT was an adventure, the latter trips to more thoroughly explore the areas that caught our attention was quite rewarding.

                                      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <jmaddog1082@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > To break the monotony of oatmeal, I use the Krusteaz brand pancake mix for a treat. Ideally, this requires a small, lightweight frying pan (Target $4.99, about 6oz after removing the unecessary handle). The Krusteaz brand is just add water, so I prepare portions in Zip-Locs to add water later. It's a very fine powder, so it packs very dense with low volume. Mix in bag, tear off a tip of the bag's corner, then squeeze into the pan like a pastry tube (or whatever that thing's called).
                                      >
                                      > To avoid the sticky clean-up associated with syrup on a plate, I just roll the pancakes like a tortilla and drizzle the syrup onto the end as I eat it by hand. Use syrup packets (not tubs) from your favorite fast food breakfast stop.
                                      >
                                      > Enjoy but don't forget to share some with your now envious, oatmeal chompin' trail mates.
                                      >
                                      > J
                                      > ---- Jonathan <jonnyboy9543@...> wrote:
                                      > > As I redo my meal list, I find that I have too many breakfasts that are all variations of instant oatmeal or couscous, and that my lunches mostly consist of "Gorp+String Cheese+clif bar". While some of these are good, I'm not so certain that I'll want to be eating that for my entire 20 day adventure. I'm sure that the 700+ members here could provide me with some taste-bud-exciting breakfasts and lunches, right?
                                      > >
                                      >
                                    • Jean Dickinson
                                      I ve seen people use the term yo-yo and never known what it meant. Duh! I gather it means going one way on the JMT, leaving the trail someplace mid-way and
                                      Message 18 of 28 , Feb 24, 2010
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                                        I've seen people use the term "yo-yo" and never known what it meant. Duh! I gather it means going one way on the JMT, leaving the trail someplace mid-way and then going to the other end and hiking back to the midpoint. Is that right? Or does it mean going a certain distance, coming out to re-supply and going back the same way?
                                         
                                        I love the idea of 19 or 20 days south and then 19 north. Roleigh, I would love to know more about your plan for this trip with your kids. Where do you start and then come out mid-trip? And then where do you go? 
                                         
                                        Jean 
                                         

                                        To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                                        From: pburke@...
                                        Date: Tue, 23 Feb 2010 14:00:05 -0600
                                        Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: Breakfast and lunch

                                         
                                        On 2/23/2010 1:23 PM, Roleigh Martin wrote:
                                         

                                        Peter, you hike the JMT in 10 days -- my hat's off to you.  That is really trekking.  How old are you, may I ask?

                                        I did it in 9 days in 1990 and we exited further south at Horseshoe Meadows instead of the portal (do not recommend that alternate unless you like beach-walking at 11,000 feet).  I  was 27 that summer and it was the third JMT for me. Nowadays I go with my kids and take my time since their legs aren't long enough to go that fast, although they did surprise me with a 20 mile day last summer. Back in the late 80s and early 90s, I did all my JMTs under 14 days "taking my time. This year, I am looking at up to 39 days on the trail for the yo-yo with my kids, taking it super easy on the first 100 miles, which I think was a bit harsh last summer when we first tried it. We'll take 19-20 days south, and 19 north, or something along those lines. I don't plan to be home for 7 weeks at least.






                                      • Peter Burke
                                        ... leave the trail mid-way? Why? Yo-yo means go it from one end to the other, turn around and go back to where you came from. ... Not sure if Roleigh is
                                        Message 19 of 28 , Feb 24, 2010
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                                          On 2/24/2010 9:08 AM, Jean Dickinson wrote:
                                           

                                          I've seen people use the term "yo-yo" and never known what it meant. Duh! I gather it means going one way on the JMT, leaving the trail someplace mid-way and then going to the other end and hiking back to the midpoint. Is that right? Or does it mean going a certain distance, coming out to re-supply and going back the same way?


                                          leave the trail mid-way? Why? Yo-yo means go it from one end to the other, turn around and go back to where you came from.

                                           
                                          I love the idea of 19 or 20 days south and then 19 north. Roleigh, I would love to know more about your plan for this trip with your kids. Where do you start and then come out mid-trip? And then where do you go? 
                                           
                                          Jean 


                                          Not sure if Roleigh is actually planning to do that  :)


                                        • judy
                                          Instant grits also makes a nice breakfast base. I add powder milk, dried fruit, etc at home and put it all into a freezer bag. On the trail I just add hot
                                          Message 20 of 28 , Feb 24, 2010
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                                            Instant grits also makes a nice breakfast base. I add powder milk, dried fruit, etc at home and put it all into a freezer bag. On the trail I just add hot water to the bag, and eat directly from the bag also. Nice and easy and no cleanup!

                                            I have also tried some of those home dried fruit and veg recipes from Sarah Kirkconnell's Freezer Bag Cooking Book and found that they taste best if not rehydrated--just eaten like dried fruit straight from the bag. They seem to get mushy and unappetizing if rehydrated.

                                            Judy
                                          • Jean Dickinson
                                            Thanks for the clarification. Sorry I confused you and Roleaigh. Jean To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com From: pburke@doit.wisc.edu Date: Wed, 24 Feb 2010
                                            Message 21 of 28 , Feb 24, 2010
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                                              Thanks for the clarification. Sorry I confused you and Roleaigh.
                                              Jean
                                               

                                              To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                                              From: pburke@...
                                              Date: Wed, 24 Feb 2010 09:27:15 -0600
                                              Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: Yo-Yo trip

                                               
                                              On 2/24/2010 9:08 AM, Jean Dickinson wrote:
                                               

                                              I've seen people use the term "yo-yo" and never known what it meant. Duh! I gather it means going one way on the JMT, leaving the trail someplace mid-way and then going to the other end and hiking back to the midpoint. Is that right? Or does it mean going a certain distance, coming out to re-supply and going back the same way?


                                              leave the trail mid-way? Why? Yo-yo means go it from one end to the other, turn around and go back to where you came from.

                                               
                                              I love the idea of 19 or 20 days south and then 19 north. Roleigh, I would love to know more about your plan for this trip with your kids. Where do you start and then come out mid-trip? And then where do you go? 
                                               
                                              Jean 

                                              Not sure if Roleigh is actually planning to do that  :)



                                            • John Ladd
                                              Breakfast: The various grains (Cream of Wheat aka farina, Cream of Rice, Malt-o-Meal, instant polenta, grits) give you some opportunity to vary the breakfast.
                                              Message 22 of 28 , Feb 27, 2010
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                                                Breakfast:

                                                The various grains (Cream of Wheat aka farina, Cream of Rice, Malt-o-Meal, instant polenta, grits) give you some opportunity to vary the breakfast.  Look for versions that cook in 5 minutes.  Bring them to a simmer, turn the stove off, wait 5 minutes. Relight the stove and bring to a simmer again and pour into something insulated (a cozy or something like the cheap plastic REI insulated mugs).  Wait 5 minutes more and eat. (Try this at home first to get your timing right).  All of these grains fit a bearcan more compactly than oatmeal and have about the same calories per oz.  By getting the grains out of your pot while still runny (and letting it jell in the mug), you minimize pot-cleaning issues.

                                                You can mix any of the above 50-50 with Almond Meal (ground almonds) available at Trader Joe's, which adds protein and fat and improves the calories per oz.

                                                You can add ghee (clarified butter) to really boost the calories per oz.  I probably consume close to 300 calories per day of ghee with my breakfasts. Ghee is very stable on the trail (they don't bother to refrigerate it in India).

                                                You can vary the flavor of the sweetener you use.  Try brown sugar some days, raw sugar some, Splenda some days, maple sugar some days (boil down maple sugar to a crystalline state).

                                                You can get more variety by adding raisins or currents or diced dates.  Prunes if your body likes them.

                                                You can pre-cook bacon before you leave home and eat cold or heat it up.  (Or buy bacon at a resupply point and cook it, diced, in something like a JetBoil before you rejoin the trail.)

                                                You can bring eggs and softboil them (or hard boil them, but that requires more fuel).  If you pack them carefully, they won't break.  For softboil, bring water and egg to a simmer and turn off.  Wait 5 minutes and bring to a simmer again and turn off again.  Put into something insulated and eat about 5 minutes later.  (Try at home first to get the yolk the way your like it.) 

                                                Lunch:

                                                Try field-mixed hummus.  Mix 1/4 cup hummus powder (mostly chickpea flour aka garbanzo flour) with 1/4 cup olive oil and 1/4 cup water when you are making your breakfast and put it in a jar.  My lunch time it will ave firmed up to a nice consistency.  Eat straight out of the jar, or on tortillas or (my favorite) blue corn taco shells, which pack pretty well if you break them in half and stack the halves in a pint-sized freezer Ziplock.  I buy the hummus powder at bulk stores but this brand is carried in many grocery stores.

                                                51MGPKN6R4L._SL500_AA280_PIbundle-12,TopRight,0,0_AA280_SH20_.jpg

                                                You can vary the flavor of the hummus by adding lemon powder (the dry lemonade mix works, diced sundried tomatoes, or various spices.  Or try walnut oil or hazelnut oil instead of olive oil (if your budget permits it).  Or replace some of the oil with tahini (essentially peanut butter made with sesame seeds rather than peanuts).

                                                Try field-mixed tabouli (tabouleh).  Mix it in the morning using a 50-50 mix of oil and water.  (I don't remember the dry-to-wet ratio, but package directions will tell you.)  I get mine in bulk stores, but also in many grocery stores:

                                                CS03-_Casbah_Tabouli_Mix_12x170g.jpg


                                                Peanut butter. Almond butter. Macademia butter.  trader joe's has a variety of nut butters.

                                                Proscuito.  Eat within 5 days of leaving.

                                                Believe it or not, thin-sliced Lardo (aka Proscuitto Bianco) an Italian version of cured fatback and 225 calories per oz..  See New Yorker article on this surprisingly good (and trail-stable) food. My favorite brand is Boccalone.  Carry it as a solid block.  Cut thin slices to eat.  Good on the Blue Corn Taco Shells.

                                                Hard cheese and nuts. A good, hard Parmesan Reggiano is my favorite taste-wise; I'm OK with Gjetost (a Norweigiam skier's cheese) and it has more calories than the parmesan.  Hard Romano is good also.  They are all pretty stable on trail.

                                                John Curran Ladd
                                                1616 Castro Street
                                                San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
                                                415-648-9279



                                              • Jim Underwood
                                                Great info, thanks. Where do you get ghee? ________________________________ From: John Ladd To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com Sent: Sat,
                                                Message 23 of 28 , Feb 27, 2010
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                                                  Great info, thanks.  Where do you get ghee?



                                                  From: John Ladd <johnladd@...>
                                                  To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                                                  Sent: Sat, February 27, 2010 1:00:27 AM
                                                  Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Breakfast and lunch

                                                   

                                                  Breakfast:

                                                  The various grains (Cream of Wheat aka farina, Cream of Rice, Malt-o-Meal, instant polenta, grits) give you some opportunity to vary the breakfast.  Look for versions that cook in 5 minutes.  Bring them to a simmer, turn the stove off, wait 5 minutes. Relight the stove and bring to a simmer again and pour into something insulated (a cozy or something like the cheap plastic REI insulated mugs).  Wait 5 minutes more and eat. (Try this at home first to get your timing right).  All of these grains fit a bearcan more compactly than oatmeal and have about the same calories per oz.  By getting the grains out of your pot while still runny (and letting it jell in the mug), you minimize pot-cleaning issues.

                                                  You can mix any of the above 50-50 with Almond Meal (ground almonds) available at Trader Joe's, which adds protein and fat and improves the calories per oz.

                                                  You can add ghee (clarified butter) to really boost the calories per oz.  I probably consume close to 300 calories per day of ghee with my breakfasts. Ghee is very stable on the trail (they don't bother to refrigerate it in India).

                                                  You can vary the flavor of the sweetener you use.  Try brown sugar some days, raw sugar some, Splenda some days, maple sugar some days (boil down maple sugar to a crystalline state).

                                                  You can get more variety by adding raisins or currents or diced dates.  Prunes if your body likes them.

                                                  You can pre-cook bacon before you leave home and eat cold or heat it up.  (Or buy bacon at a resupply point and cook it, diced, in something like a JetBoil before you rejoin the trail.)

                                                  You can bring eggs and softboil them (or hard boil them, but that requires more fuel).  If you pack them carefully, they won't break.  For softboil, bring water and egg to a simmer and turn off.  Wait 5 minutes and bring to a simmer again and turn off again.  Put into something insulated and eat about 5 minutes later.  (Try at home first to get the yolk the way your like it.) 

                                                  Lunch:

                                                  Try field-mixed hummus.  Mix 1/4 cup hummus powder (mostly chickpea flour aka garbanzo flour) with 1/4 cup olive oil and 1/4 cup water when you are making your breakfast and put it in a jar.  My lunch time it will ave firmed up to a nice consistency.  Eat straight out of the jar, or on tortillas or (my favorite) blue corn taco shells, which pack pretty well if you break them in half and stack the halves in a pint-sized freezer Ziplock.  I buy the hummus powder at bulk stores but this brand is carried in many grocery stores.

                                                  51MGPKN6R4L._SL500_AA280_PIbundle-12,TopRight,0,0_AA280_SH20_.jpg

                                                  You can vary the flavor of the hummus by adding lemon powder (the dry lemonade mix works, diced sundried tomatoes, or various spices.  Or try walnut oil or hazelnut oil instead of olive oil (if your budget permits it).  Or replace some of the oil with tahini (essentially peanut butter made with sesame seeds rather than peanuts).

                                                  Try field-mixed tabouli (tabouleh).  Mix it in the morning using a 50-50 mix of oil and water.  (I don't remember the dry-to-wet ratio, but package directions will tell you.)  I get mine in bulk stores, but also in many grocery stores:

                                                  CS03-_Casbah_Tabouli_Mix_12x170g.jpg


                                                  Peanut butter. Almond butter. Macademia butter.  trader joe's has a variety of nut butters.

                                                  Proscuito.  Eat within 5 days of leaving.

                                                  Believe it or not, thin-sliced Lardo (aka Proscuitto Bianco) an Italian version of cured fatback and 225 calories per oz..  See New Yorker article on this surprisingly good (and trail-stable) food. My favorite brand is Boccalone.  Carry it as a solid block.  Cut thin slices to eat.  Good on the Blue Corn Taco Shells.

                                                  Hard cheese and nuts. A good, hard Parmesan Reggiano is my favorite taste-wise; I'm OK with Gjetost (a Norweigiam skier's cheese) and it has more calories than the parmesan.  Hard Romano is good also.  They are all pretty stable on trail.

                                                  John Curran Ladd
                                                  1616 Castro Street
                                                  San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
                                                  415-648-9279




                                                • John Ladd
                                                  You can buy ghee, but it s easy to make. Take unsalted butter, simmer it long enough to get rid of all the water (it will stop bubbling when the water is
                                                  Message 24 of 28 , Feb 27, 2010
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                                                    You can buy ghee, but it's easy to make.  Take unsalted butter, simmer it long enough to get rid of all the water (it will stop bubbling when the water is gone).  Skim off the foam that rises to the top and pour off the pure, clear butter oil, trying to avoid including the solids that sink to the bottom  Longer gentle cooking will give the ghee an interesting flavor, but is not necessary.

                                                    If you use normal (salted) butter, all the salt will sink to the bottom of the oil as it gels and it will be too salty as you use the last 10-15% of the jar.

                                                    Can be made at resupply points if you have a stove with good heat control and can buy butter. But it is VERY stable so you can probably mail it to yourself.

                                                    I usually pour it into a sterilized plastic jar (one that was simmered for 5-10 minutes) and freeze it for a time before mailing it. 

                                                    To buy:

                                                    http://www.google.com/products?hl=en&q=ghee&sourceid=navclient-ff&rlz=1B3MOZA_enUS366US366&ie=UTF-8

                                                    To make:

                                                    http://www.mediterranean-food-recipes.com/ghee.html


                                                    or

                                                    http://mideastfood.about.com/od/dipsandsauces/r/ghee.htm

                                                    John Curran Ladd
                                                    1616 Castro Street
                                                    San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
                                                    415-648-9279


                                                    On Sat, Feb 27, 2010 at 8:48 PM, Jim Underwood <underwoodjjd@...> wrote:
                                                     

                                                    Great info, thanks.  Where do you get ghee?

                                                  • Jim Underwood
                                                    Thanks, John. Do you also bring olive oil for fats? Or just the Ghee? ________________________________ From: John Ladd To:
                                                    Message 25 of 28 , Feb 28, 2010
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                                                      Thanks, John.  Do you also bring olive oil for fats?  Or just the Ghee?



                                                      From: John Ladd <johnladd@...>
                                                      To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                                                      Sent: Sat, February 27, 2010 9:02:54 PM
                                                      Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Breakfast and lunch

                                                       

                                                      You can buy ghee, but it's easy to make.  Take unsalted butter, simmer it long enough to get rid of all the water (it will stop bubbling when the water is gone).  Skim off the foam that rises to the top and pour off the pure, clear butter oil, trying to avoid including the solids that sink to the bottom  Longer gentle cooking will give the ghee an interesting flavor, but is not necessary.

                                                      If you use normal (salted) butter, all the salt will sink to the bottom of the oil as it gels and it will be too salty as you use the last 10-15% of the jar.

                                                      Can be made at resupply points if you have a stove with good heat control and can buy butter. But it is VERY stable so you can probably mail it to yourself.

                                                      I usually pour it into a sterilized plastic jar (one that was simmered for 5-10 minutes) and freeze it for a time before mailing it. 

                                                      To buy:

                                                      http://www.google. com/products? hl=en&q=ghee&sourceid=navclient- ff&rlz=1B3MOZA_ enUS366US366&ie=UTF-8

                                                      To make:

                                                      http://www.mediterr anean-food- recipes.com/ ghee.html


                                                      or

                                                      http://mideastfood. about.com/ od/dipsandsauces /r/ghee.htm

                                                      John Curran Ladd
                                                      1616 Castro Street
                                                      San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
                                                      415-648-9279


                                                      On Sat, Feb 27, 2010 at 8:48 PM, Jim Underwood <underwoodjjd@ yahoo.com> wrote:
                                                       

                                                      Great info, thanks.  Where do you get ghee?


                                                    • John Ladd
                                                      Jim asks: Thanks, John. Do you also bring olive oil for fats? Or just the Ghee? On short trips, I take Ghee for breakfast, olive oil for lunch (to field-mix
                                                      Message 26 of 28 , Feb 28, 2010
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                                                        Jim asks:

                                                        Thanks, John.  Do you also bring olive oil for fats?  Or just the Ghee?

                                                        On short trips, I take Ghee for breakfast, olive oil for lunch (to field-mix hummus and tabouleh) and some meat-based fat for dinner (probably rendered bacon fat or Lardo most often). I'll almost always melt together some chocolate with coconut oil, coconut flakes and almonds (and let it set inside a plastic jar or dish with a lid) to eat just before getting into my sleeping bag.

                                                        But on longer trips. I'll get tired of just these, so I will take some of the following, if only for variety:

                                                        For breakfast

                                                        pre-cooked bacon with some of the rendered bacon fat
                                                        coconut oil to add to hot cereals instead of the ghee
                                                        and there are oils in the almond meal

                                                        For lunch

                                                        lemon-infused olive oil
                                                        walnut oil or hazelnut oil (used same way as olive oil)
                                                        peanut, almond or macadenmia nut butters
                                                        nuts

                                                        For dinner (to mix into something that has carbs and hopefully protein)

                                                        a hard sausage with a lot of fat - Saags Landjaeger is good
                                                        high-fat cheese (also lunch)
                                                        I have taken salt pork, though I've now sworn off of it (replaced it with Lardo)

                                                        For snacks

                                                        There are various candies based mostly on honey and sesame seeds that have a lot of fat
                                                        Candies with coconut tend to have a lot of fat

                                                        My underlying tyheory is that any fat or oil has over twice the calories per oz. of any sugar, protein or carbohydrate, so the more fats/oils the better (within reason).  I look for things naturally high in fats/oils (e.g., the nuts, cheese, hard sausage, bacon) or add oils/fats to things that carry them well (the Cream of Wheat, hummus powder, etc.)


                                                        John Curran Ladd
                                                        1616 Castro Street
                                                        San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
                                                        415-648-9279


                                                        On Sun, Feb 28, 2010 at 11:32 AM, Jim Underwood <underwoodjjd@...> wrote:
                                                         

                                                        Thanks, John.  Do you also bring olive oil for fats?  Or just the Ghee?


                                                        Sent: Sat, February 27, 2010 9:02:54 PM

                                                        Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Breakfast and lunch

                                                         

                                                        You can buy ghee, but it's easy to make.  Take unsalted butter, simmer it long enough to get rid of all the water (it will stop bubbling when the water is gone).  Skim off the foam that rises to the top and pour off the pure, clear butter oil, trying to avoid including the solids that sink to the bottom  Longer gentle cooking will give the ghee an interesting flavor, but is not necessary.



                                                        If you use normal (salted) butter, all the salt will sink to the bottom of the oil as it gels and it will be too salty as you use the last 10-15% of the jar.

                                                        Can be made at resupply points if you have a stove with good heat control and can buy butter. But it is VERY stable so you can probably mail it to yourself.

                                                        I usually pour it into a sterilized plastic jar (one that was simmered for 5-10 minutes) and freeze it for a time before mailing it. 

                                                        To buy:

                                                        http://www.google. com/products? hl=en&q=ghee&sourceid=navclient- ff&rlz=1B3MOZA_ enUS366US366&ie=UTF-8

                                                        To make:

                                                        http://www.mediterr anean-food- recipes.com/ ghee.html



                                                        or

                                                        http://mideastfood. about.com/ od/dipsandsauces /r/ghee.htm

                                                        John Curran Ladd
                                                        1616 Castro Street
                                                        San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
                                                        415-648-9279


                                                        On Sat, Feb 27, 2010 at 8:48 PM, Jim Underwood <underwoodjjd@ yahoo.com> wrote:
                                                         

                                                        Great info, thanks.  Where do you get ghee?



                                                      • Patronio@aol.com
                                                        Every time that I try powder milk in my backpackin grips, it ends up clumping (spelling?) in big untasty balls. I never get it to get milky consistency. Can
                                                        Message 27 of 28 , Mar 2, 2010
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                                                          Every time that I try powder milk in my backpackin grips, it ends up clumping (spelling?) in big untasty balls. I never get it to get "milky" consistency. Can someone tell me how to  avoid this dilema or how to mix it to get it to work? Thank you.
                                                          Julio
                                                        • heartfire144
                                                          Non fat powdered milk can take a long time to mix well, especially with really cold water. You re supposed to mix it up, let it sit for a while in the fridge
                                                          Message 28 of 28 , Mar 2, 2010
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                                                            Non fat powdered milk can take a long time to mix well, especially with really cold water. You're supposed to mix it up, let it sit for a while in the fridge and then shake/mix some more.

                                                            Nido - whole milk mixes quite readily without the clumping problem.

                                                            But, next time, try this; put the powdered milk in whatever container you want, add a small amount of water and mix (stir), (it won't even make the whole thing moist) add another small amount of water and mix, do this bit by bit until it is all runny, then you can add the rest of the water and it should be fine.

                                                            This works with any powdered stuff that tends to clump - pudding mixes etc.
                                                            Judy

                                                            --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Patronio@... wrote:
                                                            >
                                                            > Every time that I try powder milk in my backpackin grips, it ends up
                                                            > clumping (spelling?) in big untasty balls. I never get it to get "milky"
                                                            > consistency. Can someone tell me how to avoid this dilema or how to mix it to get
                                                            > it to work? Thank you.
                                                            > Julio
                                                            >
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