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  • robert shattuck
    Barbara, I dropped 20 pounds with my JMT pack diet. you can too. I ve got way too much free time––you shouldn t have asked . . . (job search––what
    Message 1 of 35 , Feb 1, 2010
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      Barbara, 

      " I dropped 20 pounds with my JMT pack diet. you can too. " 

      I've got way too much free time––you shouldn't have asked . . . (job search––what job search?) My list is a compromise of heavy and light. I think the basic stuff: b-pack, tent, bag, stove, canister . . . comes in at about thirteen pounds? 

      Add to that another 10-13 for food. I carry pretty much no toiletries or medical stuff . . . small T-paste, TP, fem-naps (great band-aids) vial of ibuprofen, lots. 

      I'm really happy with what I carry now––it's 30-40 pounds at any time. I've skimped on nothing––shaved weight is great, but time spent fiddling, frustrated, is not . . . how heavy are those JMT pins going to be . . . hmmmm? 


      I did my first couple JMTs with a seven pound DANA astralplane. Hello. overkill. I carried everything and a personal chef. I am now very happy with my granite gear pack, except when I put it on, in my mind I am always hefting the Dana and a 60lb load, which is an odd sensation. 

      BACKPACK: granite gear meridian vapor 2lbs 14oz . . . http://www.granitegear.com/products/backpacks/ultralight/meridianvapor.html

      Same with my bag. it was and or is a circa '73 . . . Trailwise expedition bag. 5.5 pounds and I just slept under it most of the time. Now, the slightest breeze will blow the Millet away (had to chase it barefoot, once) and it's a tight fit, but I often only pull it up to my waist. Only bummer––I don't think you can get them here. I bought it in Nepal. 

      SLEEPING BAG Millet xp500 sleeping bag 480 grams . . . 1lb. 93 ounces . . . http://www.adventureextreme.com.au/catalogue/millet/product.php/9/0/2/12/121

      I own three other, bulky, heavy down jackets. The Montbell is scary-light and I often use it as my top-half in my sleep system. it's another item you don't want to carelessly leave around as it too, will float like a feather, into the wind. 

      JACKET:  Montbell U.L. down inner parka 9-10 oz. . . . . http://www.prolitegear.com/montbell_ul_down_inner_parka.html

      I am poor. I'd love to buy a BIG AGNES or some other hi-end, LIGHT, tent, but I have been perfectly happy with REI tents. They weigh a bit, but they're a luxury. I use mine for both summer and winter camping. I like to be able to live in the tent, not just squeeze myself into a bivy-like experience. tried that route. no fun. 

      TENT: REI Arete ASL2 5lbs.2 oz . . . http://www.rei.com/product/753332

      Go ahead, burn your twigs, your esbits, your coke cans and keep burning them, while I get to my dinner. The MSR is another Luxury item, I won't go without. 

      STOVE: MSR simmer lite 15.5 ounces/ . . . http://cascadedesigns.com/MSR/Stoves/Fast-And-Light-Stoves/SimmerLite/product

      Bear Canister, whatever type––no brainer. 

      BEARS : Garcia Canister 2lbs.12 oz.  . . . http://www.rei.com/product/624081

      The Patagonia R1 Hoody is kinda pricey (but there are deals out there!) but it's also warm and I love having the hood, especially for sleeping––Zip it up, no cold neck. I wear it with the montbell and a poly-T as my sleep gear. toasty. 

      LAYER: Patagonia R1 hoody 10.9 ounces . . . http://www.patagonia.com/web/us/product/patagonia-mens-r1-hoody?slc=en_US&sct=US&p=40071-0-155


      I used to take either a trash bag, or some heavy shell, that I would only wear when it rained––the MH is a nice compromise and a complement to the down jacket on colder mornings/nights

      RAIN/WEATHER : MH Epic 15 oz. . . . http://www.mountainhardwear.com/Product.aspx?top=1827&prod=3226&cat=1869&viewAll=False

      PUR/katadyne hiker pro water filter . . . another luxury item that you will be lending to your thirsty friends while they wait for their purification drops or tabs to work. 

      2 poly-pro T-shirts

      3 socks

      2 poly underwear

      1 long-johns

      1 zip-pants

      MH gloves

      1 pair teva

      MSR Dromedary, plus one bottle, one pot, fork, spoon. 

      assorted stuff in top pocket . . . journal, pens, camera, maps, headlamp, exacto-blade (no knife!) whistle, compass . . . 




      http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480






      To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
      From: barbara@...
      Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2010 10:34:58 -0800
      Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Crawlies and mosquitos

       

      Hey Bob, care to show us your gear list?  I'd love to see it ('49, UK). 

      Barbara

      On Feb 1, 2010, at 9:54 AM, robert shattuck <bobolonius@hotmail. com> wrote:

       
      "looks like fun" . . . I'd bring the jetboil and be done with it, because it won't be any fun if your practiced technique, goes south on ya . . . especially if you want to cook for two or three people. 

      As for your tents––they both look good. As long as you can zip up and keep the bugs out, you're good. There might come some windy days when you'd wished for a regular, "bomber" free-standing tent, but . . . they look good. 

      I'm either a wimp or a glutton for punishment––I'll carry the weight and security of knowing that my stove can beat up your stove and my tent will still be  standing when the weather has finally passed. 

      I must keep meeting the inexperienced people–––the ones who just bought their spiffy new super-lite tent (or the guy that thought, forget the stove, I'll do with just rocks as a base and twigs)  . . . I know there are hikers out there that can set a tent up in a thrashing storm, or do a Bear Grylls, and cook with a wet stick . . . 

      . . . but no, I meet the guy that takes half an hour to stake down his non-free-standing tent and I just sit there watching, or the stove thing . . . "it worked in the back yard" . . .  and then again, it really just boils down (in an MSR second :) to confounded jealousy. 

      I am always amazed with the super-lite thing, but it always seems like too much work, or too much suffering––like sleeping under a tarp and letting the bugs have their way with you, or needing to find a place to string up your tent or fidgeting with twigs to get a cup of warm water. I'm a wimp, but I'm down to 30-35 lbs, food and all. 

      I was born ('57) in Hawaii,  but never been back. one of these days I'll have to trade the sierra for some surf. 







      To: johnmuirtrail@ yahoogroups. com
      From: dawgbronco@yahoo. com
      Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2010 09:18:06 +0000
      Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Crawlies and mosquitos

       
      Bob, flying in to Mammoth. Our friend's widow lives in Bishop and will provide transportation to the trailhead. (Or bus to Bishop and thumb/taxi to trailhead) Time constraints? We are allowing ten days to Whitney. This is our first JMT hike. Plan to finish it next year. I'll be 60 then. I will practice with the Sierra Stove Titanium till I get it or give up. Looks like fun. I have a Jetboil (great coffee!) and a Primus Etapower. Three of us going. If the SS works out we'll also take the Jetboil and a gas cartridge for making coffee. If I don't like the SS, We'll take the Primus. Thanks!

      --- In johnmuirtrail@ yahoogroups. com, robert shattuck <bobolonius@ ...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > aloha,
      > mid-july you're still going to have mosquitos. if I were you I'd have a full on tent, rather than a tarp as nights with bugs can be a drag. nice to have a placve to hide out from them.
      > A 25 degree bag will be fine––no problems.
      > A sierra stove? Have you been practicing. Are you happy when things aren't exactly cooked . . . I should say I'm not an expert with these stoves or other ultra-lite, coke can devices . . . people use them . . . my experiences is only that I've had to lend out my stove to others that thought they'd bring their nifty little alcohol stove . . . but twigs???.
      > And I'm sure that the rangers and so on, would have no problem with you using and BURNING twigs over 10,000 feet––but you never know. My thinking is always, if you're coming from a long way away, to attempt this often overwhelming trip, you might want a few dependable things, such as a stove.
      > if all your other gear is light weight, a decent canister or white gas (did someone say, MSR whisper-lite? ) stove that will guarantee a boil at any altitude, in any weather . . . is not a bad idea.
      > where are you flying into and why are you starting at Bishop Pass. Time constraints? done half the trail already?
      > bob
      >
      > sparklefart. blogspot. com
      > http://www.summitpo st.org/plans/ view_activity. php?post_ id=6480
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      > To: johnmuirtrail@ yahoogroups. com
      > From: dawgbronco@. ..
      > Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2010 05:35:18 +0000
      > Subject: [John Muir Trail] Crawlies and mosquitos
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      > Have a permit. Starting Bishop Pass end of July and going to Whitney on the JMT. I live in Hawaii so the bug screen is not an option but the tarp is. Please tell me about insects at the campsites. Should I bring the nest or just the tarp and tub? And will a 25 degree bag suffice? Also, taking a Sierra Stove. Any advice?
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    • John Ladd
      ... so, how long does it | take? The NeoAir doesn t self-inflate - you blow in all the air. But it s not too bad. Not like the air mattresses I remember form
      Message 35 of 35 , Feb 2, 2010
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        On Tue, Feb 2, 2010 at 5:16 AM, <Patronio@...> wrote:
         

        | Is the Neo Air self-inflatable? Do you have to blow too much air and if so, how long does it | take?

        The NeoAir doesn't self-inflate - you blow in all the air.  But it's not too bad.  Not like the air mattresses I remember form years ago.

        One nice thing is that it deflates really quickly and really well.

        As I said earlier today, I've used it this weekend down to about 13 degrees (but it was with an old Ridgecrest closed cell pad - I usually need 2 pads in the snow).  Kept nice and warm (but I also had a good bag).

        John Curran Ladd
        1616 Castro Street
        San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
        415-648-9279


        On Tue, Feb 2, 2010 at 5:16 AM, <Patronio@...> wrote:
         

        Is the Neo Air self-inflatable? Do you have to blow too much air and if so, how long does it take?


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