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Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: ISO JMT Partner 2010

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  • Peter Burke
    ... FYI - I met more people in late September than July - almost everyone I talked to came in September because they were trying to avoid the summer crowds
    Message 1 of 13 , Dec 23, 2009
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      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Although it is great to hike with a group of people and definitely
      > safer, the JMT is probably the one long hike that can be reasonably
      > done solo during the summer if you already have good hiking
      > experience. There are so many people on the trail in July and August
      > that you are never far from help.
      >

      FYI - I met more people in late September than July - almost everyone I
      talked to came in September because "they were trying to avoid the
      summer crowds"

      So - extend that window of not being alone into the middle of September
      at the least. Also, that doesn't mean you will see "crowds." This year,
      I think the number of hikers on the JMT proper was about half of what I
      used to see in the late 80s. Last year, on July 17, between Palisade
      Creek and Upper Basin across Mather Pass, we didn't meet a single person
      on the JMT - nobody in peak season!

      Bottom line - you won't be alone, but don't be surprised if you find
      yourself alone for many hours of the day. Less and less people are
      actually traveling in the backcountry. Far more people used to go out
      there in the 70s and 80s. If you choose go on any alternate trails you
      will almost be guaranteed to be totally alone. Bring a SPOT or some
      other rescue beacon and enjoy the solitude.

      What usually happens on the JMT is that you more or less leapfrog the
      same people every day and find your companions that way, without being
      bound to hiking with anyone or compromise on speed and schedule.

      Peter
    • Linda Reitz
      Last year I started hiking alone but ended up with a partner very soon, I really enjoyed hiking with her but am left with the question........how do we say
      Message 2 of 13 , Dec 30, 2009
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        Last year I started hiking alone but ended up with a partner very soon, I really enjoyed hiking with her but am left with the question........how do we say "just really want to hike alone for a while" .......you know, just a little awkward.
        Planing on doing the whole trail this year and have 4 weeks vacation saved up. I love reading these emails while dreaming of the trail.


        From: Peter Burke <pburke@...>
        To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wed, December 23, 2009 9:39:05 AM
        Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: ISO JMT Partner 2010

         


        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Although it is great to hike with a group of people and definitely
        > safer, the JMT is probably the one long hike that can be reasonably
        > done solo during the summer if you already have good hiking
        > experience. There are so many people on the trail in July and August
        > that you are never far from help.
        >

        FYI - I met more people in late September than July - almost everyone I
        talked to came in September because "they were trying to avoid the
        summer crowds"

        So - extend that window of not being alone into the middle of September
        at the least. Also, that doesn't mean you will see "crowds." This year,
        I think the number of hikers on the JMT proper was about half of what I
        used to see in the late 80s. Last year, on July 17, between Palisade
        Creek and Upper Basin across Mather Pass, we didn't meet a single person
        on the JMT - nobody in peak season!

        Bottom line - you won't be alone, but don't be surprised if you find
        yourself alone for many hours of the day. Less and less people are
        actually traveling in the backcountry. Far more people used to go out
        there in the 70s and 80s. If you choose go on any alternate trails you
        will almost be guaranteed to be totally alone. Bring a SPOT or some
        other rescue beacon and enjoy the solitude.

        What usually happens on the JMT is that you more or less leapfrog the
        same people every day and find your companions that way, without being
        bound to hiking with anyone or compromise on speed and schedule.

        Peter


      • yountvlmom
        On Dec 30, 2009, at 3:27:15 AM, Linda Reitz wrote: From: Linda Reitz Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Re:
        Message 3 of 13 , Dec 30, 2009
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          On Dec 30, 2009, at 3:27:15 AM, "Linda Reitz" <hikejmt47@...> wrote:

          From:"Linda Reitz" <hikejmt47@...>
          Subject:Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: ISO JMT Partner 2010
          Date:December 30, 2009 3:27:15 AM PST
          To:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
          Greetings to all!  My plans for next summer's hike are still flexible.  No one has yet decided to join me but I will apply for two permits.  My plan is to hike from TM to WP in three weeks.  This will be my fourth hike.  I've done it in 15 days but I'm happy with my new pace.  Going alone doesn't bother me one bit but I believe there are stretches that beg for company such as leaving south of RM.  I have John Dittli's book and love showing people the pictures and telling them my stories.  Awesome photos!  This forum has been so informative and entertaining to me.  When I got to MTR last summer, Pat told me who from the group had recently been there.  I felt a part of a new family.  I look forward to the posts and everyone's plans for this summer.  But, this year I hope we have a ribbon or a certain colored bandana as a trail signal.  Last summer I was on the summit of Forrester with Wandering Bob and didn't know it until that evening when talking to someone from my group.  Happy New Year to everyone and Happy Trails to all.  Holler if you're coming to Napa Valley.
          Darlene
          </span>


          Last year I started hiking alone but ended up with a partner very soon, I really enjoyed hiking with her but am left with the question........how do we say "just really want to hike alone for a while" .......you know, just a little awkward.
          Planing on doing the whole trail this year and have 4 weeks vacation saved up. I love reading these emails while dreaming of the trail.


          From: Peter Burke <pburke@...>
          To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Wed, December 23, 2009 9:39:05 AM
          Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: ISO JMT Partner 2010


          > 
          >
          > 
          >
          > Although it is great to hike with a group of people and definitely 
          > safer, the JMT is probably the one long hike that can be reasonably 
          > done solo during the summer if you already have good hiking 
          > experience. There are so many people on the trail in July and August 
          > that you are never far from help.
          >

          FYI - I met more people in late September than July - almost everyone I 
          talked to came in September because "they were trying to avoid the 
          summer crowds"

          So - extend that window of not being alone into the middle of September 
          at the least. Also, that doesn't mean you will see "crowds." This year, 
          I think the number of hikers on the JMT proper was about half of what I 
          used to see in the late 80s. Last year, on July 17, between Palisade 
          Creek and Upper Basin across Mather Pass, we didn't meet a single person 
          on the JMT - nobody in peak season!

          Bottom line - you won't be alone, but don't be surprised if you find 
          yourself alone for many hours of the day. Less and less people are 
          actually traveling in the backcountry. Far more people used to go out 
          there in the 70s and 80s. If you choose go on any alternate trails you 
          will almost be guaranteed to be totally alone. Bring a SPOT or some 
          other rescue beacon and enjoy the solitude.

          What usually happens on the JMT is that you more or less leapfrog the 
          same people every day and find your companions that way, without being 
          bound to hiking with anyone or compromise on speed and schedule.

          Peter




          i
        • robert shattuck
          If you really want to hike the trail, solo then just make it a point to stay, solo. if you think about it, you spend most of the day hiking in a somewhat
          Message 4 of 13 , Dec 30, 2009
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            If you really want to hike the trail, "solo" then just make it a point to stay, solo. if you think about it, you spend most of the day hiking in a somewhat solo fashion, even if you are with a small group––you're all spread out––at least I am, when I hike with others. I meet up with them at the end of the day.  

            to stay solo, you can be as friendly as you want, but just keep your distance at the end of the day––don't camp with others . . . be faster than everyone else . . . be a jerk . . . carry a big knife . . . go faster or slower than those around you (I'm running out of "how to stay solo" options) ACT like the solo dude you are. 

            I think people get it if you don't want to be around them. I do. And then again, maybe not––we all go out there with this grand idea of solitude and not dealing with people and then after a few days, we can't get enough of so-and-so. 

            My first JMT was "solo" for the first three days and then I met a crazy math teacher from santa cruz. A 24/7 pot smoker and a super annoying, but did I leave him? No. 

            Did I try to either get ahead or stay behind . . . did I think to just hide from him and let him go past me (not until I found two sweet old gals that suggested it) NO. 

            If you do settle in with someone on the trail, choose wisely. The best thing about this guy was that he gave me lots of nervous energy and rage, which helped to hurry me down the trail and mostly, he was the reason I had to do it again. 

            I think if I'd done that first JMT and it was a mellow, solo, soul-searching, physically unchallenging experience . . . I might have finished, ticked it off the list and never bothered again, but it wasn't and so I did. 

            I haven't figured out what the perfect JMT is yet and I keep letting other people screw it up for me, so that I have to come back and do it again. 

            Wait . . . it's coming . . . wait . . . the best advice in order to stay solo isn't so much staying away from people––it's just not letting yourself get sucked into anyone else's plans. Keep that distance. 

            I always get out there and the next thing you know, you've befriended someone who has to be out on a certain date and suddenly you're sucked into their trip, their itinerary. stay away from other people's plans. simple. 


            bob

            sparklefart.blogspot.com
            http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480






            To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
            From: hikejmt47@...
            Date: Wed, 30 Dec 2009 03:27:15 -0800
            Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: ISO JMT Partner 2010

             

            Last year I started hiking alone but ended up with a partner very soon, I really enjoyed hiking with her but am left with the question.... ....how do we say "just really want to hike alone for a while" .......you know, just a little awkward.
            Planing on doing the whole trail this year and have 4 weeks vacation saved up. I love reading these emails while dreaming of the trail.


            From: Peter Burke <pburke@doit. wisc.edu>
            To: johnmuirtrail@ yahoogroups. com
            Sent: Wed, December 23, 2009 9:39:05 AM
            Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: ISO JMT Partner 2010

             

            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Although it is great to hike with a group of people and definitely
            > safer, the JMT is probably the one long hike that can be reasonably
            > done solo during the summer if you already have good hiking
            > experience. There are so many people on the trail in July and August
            > that you are never far from help.
            >

            FYI - I met more people in late September than July - almost everyone I
            talked to came in September because "they were trying to avoid the
            summer crowds"

            So - extend that window of not being alone into the middle of September
            at the least. Also, that doesn't mean you will see "crowds." This year,
            I think the number of hikers on the JMT proper was about half of what I
            used to see in the late 80s. Last year, on July 17, between Palisade
            Creek and Upper Basin across Mather Pass, we didn't meet a single person
            on the JMT - nobody in peak season!

            Bottom line - you won't be alone, but don't be surprised if you find
            yourself alone for many hours of the day. Less and less people are
            actually traveling in the backcountry. Far more people used to go out
            there in the 70s and 80s. If you choose go on any alternate trails you
            will almost be guaranteed to be totally alone. Bring a SPOT or some
            other rescue beacon and enjoy the solitude.

            What usually happens on the JMT is that you more or less leapfrog the
            same people every day and find your companions that way, without being
            bound to hiking with anyone or compromise on speed and schedule.

            Peter






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          • Shawn A
            I hiked the JMT solo in July 2009-southbound. It was all fine and dandy but just be mindful of bears if going solo. Some hikers have no problems with bears,
            Message 5 of 13 , Dec 30, 2009
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              I hiked the JMT solo in July 2009-southbound. It was all fine and dandy but just be mindful of bears if going solo. Some hikers have no problems with bears, but I literally came across a bear nearly every day (5 of 7 days). I became paranoid with every meandering corner. Moreover, my trip was cut short because a bear stole my pack one night near Red's Meadow. (I know most of you are thinking, "he must have left some food or a scented item in it", but I was extremely meticulous about following etiquette- all scented items-food, toiletries, trash- were stored in bear canister and placed 50 ft from my tent...).

              I agree with most of the suggestions so far, hiking with an unknown hiker is problematic. However, like Peter said, you will meet and "leapfrog" other hikers who may have the same pace as you. If you wish to associate and join them, simply ask. Most hikers are like minded and super friendly but assertive enough to let you know that you are unwelcome. Have fun!

              --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "gkitt80" <kittrg@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hello All:
              >
              > Well, I have caught a case of cabin fever and am currently planning a trip out west to tackle the JMT in 2010. Have yet to apply for a permit (obviously) so I don't have a specific date in mind and really have no preference at this point. While I am sure I could handle a solo hike, and wouldn't necessarily have a bad time, the ladies in my life are forcing me to find a partner for this trip. I have and will continue to reach out to friends to gauge their interest, but at this point in time it doesn't look promising. Thus, the point of this post.
              >
              > Is anyone looking for a partner for a JMT thru hike this year? I would like to go north - south, but other than that I have no real preferences. Finishing the whole thing in 14ish days is the plan at this point, although I will be taking off a full 3 weeks of vacation time from work to do this. At this point I am just looking for interested parties and then we can take the communication to email. If you have any questions, or want to talk about potentially doing something together, please feel free to either respond here or send me an email.
              >
              > Thanks!
              > Greg
              >
            • Roleigh Martin
              Shawn, If you had a large enough tent to put your pack in the tent (yes, all smelly stuff goes into a bear cannister 150 feet away), do you think you d have
              Message 6 of 13 , Dec 30, 2009
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                Shawn,
                 
                If you had a large enough tent to put your pack in the tent (yes, all smelly stuff goes into a bear cannister 150 feet away), do you think you'd have avoided the problem?  I hike with a Squall Classic tent so I have room to put the pack inside the tent.  I'm also worried about Marmots chewing up gear too, so that's another reason I don't leave anything outside the tent except the bear cannister which is far away.
                 
                Roleigh

                On Wed, Dec 30, 2009 at 1:00 PM, Shawn A <s_auchterlonie@...> wrote:
                 

                I hiked the JMT solo in July 2009-southbound. It was all fine and dandy but just be mindful of bears if going solo. Some hikers have no problems with bears, but I literally came across a bear nearly every day (5 of 7 days). I became paranoid with every meandering corner. Moreover, my trip was cut short because a bear stole my pack one night near Red's Meadow. (I know most of you are thinking, "he must have left some food or a scented item in it", but I was extremely meticulous about following etiquette- all scented items-food, toiletries, trash- were stored in bear canister and placed 50 ft from my tent...).

                I agree with most of the suggestions so far, hiking with an unknown hiker is problematic. However, like Peter said, you will meet and "leapfrog" other hikers who may have the same pace as you. If you wish to associate and join them, simply ask. Most hikers are like minded and super friendly but assertive enough to let you know that you are unwelcome. Have fun!



                --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "gkitt80" <kittrg@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hello All:
                >
                > Well, I have caught a case of cabin fever and am currently planning a trip out west to tackle the JMT in 2010. Have yet to apply for a permit (obviously) so I don't have a specific date in mind and really have no preference at this point. While I am sure I could handle a solo hike, and wouldn't necessarily have a bad time, the ladies in my life are forcing me to find a partner for this trip. I have and will continue to reach out to friends to gauge their interest, but at this point in time it doesn't look promising. Thus, the point of this post.
                >
                > Is anyone looking for a partner for a JMT thru hike this year? I would like to go north - south, but other than that I have no real preferences. Finishing the whole thing in 14ish days is the plan at this point, although I will be taking off a full 3 weeks of vacation time from work to do this. At this point I am just looking for interested parties and then we can take the communication to email. If you have any questions, or want to talk about potentially doing something together, please feel free to either respond here or send me an email.
                >
                > Thanks!
                > Greg
                >


              • robert shattuck
                I ve related this story before, so I won t go into all the details, but never ever make the mistake of putting your canister in your backpack and then leaving
                Message 7 of 13 , Dec 30, 2009
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                  I've related this story before, so I won't go into all the details, but never ever make the  mistake of putting your canister in your backpack and then leaving it outside. Ha. 

                  I hiked with someone (one of those regrettable times my solo hike turned into a group hike) who did this and let's just say, that luckily he was an avid flosser and had plenty to sew up his pack. 

                  bears can smell anything, even if you empty your pack of all your supposed smelly items––they don't know an empty candy wrapper from a piece of fresh candy and they'll go for it. There's probably a very good chance to that even if you empty your pack and all along, you've been meticulous and fastidious and  so on, there's bound to be some smell about you and your gear that's gotta be tempting to bears. And let's just not forget that they gotta know what a backpack is, so why not check it out. 

                  I always sleep with my pack in an enclosed tent and I make it a habit to always do a search before I zip up––check your pockets and your pack for that candy wrapper. 



                  sparklefart.blogspot.com
                  http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480






                  To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                  From: roleigh@...
                  Date: Wed, 30 Dec 2009 14:02:45 -0600
                  Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: ISO JMT Partner 2010

                   

                  Shawn,
                   
                  If you had a large enough tent to put your pack in the tent (yes, all smelly stuff goes into a bear cannister 150 feet away), do you think you'd have avoided the problem?  I hike with a Squall Classic tent so I have room to put the pack inside the tent.  I'm also worried about Marmots chewing up gear too, so that's another reason I don't leave anything outside the tent except the bear cannister which is far away.
                   
                  Roleigh

                  On Wed, Dec 30, 2009 at 1:00 PM, Shawn A <s_auchterlonie@ yahoo.com> wrote:
                   
                  I hiked the JMT solo in July 2009-southbound. It was all fine and dandy but just be mindful of bears if going solo. Some hikers have no problems with bears, but I literally came across a bear nearly every day (5 of 7 days). I became paranoid with every meandering corner. Moreover, my trip was cut short because a bear stole my pack one night near Red's Meadow. (I know most of you are thinking, "he must have left some food or a scented item in it", but I was extremely meticulous about following etiquette- all scented items-food, toiletries, trash- were stored in bear canister and placed 50 ft from my tent...).

                  I agree with most of the suggestions so far, hiking with an unknown hiker is problematic. However, like Peter said, you will meet and "leapfrog" other hikers who may have the same pace as you. If you wish to associate and join them, simply ask. Most hikers are like minded and super friendly but assertive enough to let you know that you are unwelcome. Have fun!


                  --- In johnmuirtrail@ yahoogroups. com, "gkitt80" <kittrg@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hello All:
                  >
                  > Well, I have caught a case of cabin fever and am currently planning a trip out west to tackle the JMT in 2010. Have yet to apply for a permit (obviously) so I don't have a specific date in mind and really have no preference at this point. While I am sure I could handle a solo hike, and wouldn't necessarily have a bad time, the ladies in my life are forcing me to find a partner for this trip. I have and will continue to reach out to friends to gauge their interest, but at this point in time it doesn't look promising. Thus, the point of this post.
                  >
                  > Is anyone looking for a partner for a JMT thru hike this year? I would like to go north - south, but other than that I have no real preferences. Finishing the whole thing in 14ish days is the plan at this point, although I will be taking off a full 3 weeks of vacation time from work to do this. At this point I am just looking for interested parties and then we can take the communication to email. If you have any questions, or want to talk about potentially doing something together, please feel free to either respond here or send me an email.
                  >
                  > Thanks!
                  > Greg
                  >







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                • John
                  If you want to avoid picking up partners on the JMT, go south to north. You will have a very social trip as you will see 99% of everyone doing the trail, but
                  Message 8 of 13 , Dec 30, 2009
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                    If you want to avoid "picking up" partners on the JMT, go south to north. You will have a very social trip as you will see 99% of everyone doing the trail, but only in passing. Very few people on the north bound run.

                    John Dittli

                    Walk the Sky: following the John Muir Trail
                    johndittli.com
                    --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Roleigh Martin <roleigh@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Shawn,
                    >
                    > If you had a large enough tent to put your pack in the tent (yes, all smelly
                    > stuff goes into a bear cannister 150 feet away), do you think you'd have
                    > avoided the problem? I hike with a Squall Classic tent so I have room to
                    > put the pack inside the tent. I'm also worried about Marmots chewing up
                    > gear too, so that's another reason I don't leave anything outside the tent
                    > except the bear cannister which is far away.
                    >
                    > Roleigh
                    >
                    > On Wed, Dec 30, 2009 at 1:00 PM, Shawn A <s_auchterlonie@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > I hiked the JMT solo in July 2009-southbound. It was all fine and dandy but
                    > > just be mindful of bears if going solo. Some hikers have no problems with
                    > > bears, but I literally came across a bear nearly every day (5 of 7 days). I
                    > > became paranoid with every meandering corner. Moreover, my trip was cut
                    > > short because a bear stole my pack one night near Red's Meadow. (I know most
                    > > of you are thinking, "he must have left some food or a scented item in it",
                    > > but I was extremely meticulous about following etiquette- all scented
                    > > items-food, toiletries, trash- were stored in bear canister and placed 50 ft
                    > > from my tent...).
                    > >
                    > > I agree with most of the suggestions so far, hiking with an unknown hiker
                    > > is problematic. However, like Peter said, you will meet and "leapfrog" other
                    > > hikers who may have the same pace as you. If you wish to associate and join
                    > > them, simply ask. Most hikers are like minded and super friendly but
                    > > assertive enough to let you know that you are unwelcome. Have fun!
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com <johnmuirtrail%40yahoogroups.com>,
                    > > "gkitt80" <kittrg@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > Hello All:
                    > > >
                    > > > Well, I have caught a case of cabin fever and am currently planning a
                    > > trip out west to tackle the JMT in 2010. Have yet to apply for a permit
                    > > (obviously) so I don't have a specific date in mind and really have no
                    > > preference at this point. While I am sure I could handle a solo hike, and
                    > > wouldn't necessarily have a bad time, the ladies in my life are forcing me
                    > > to find a partner for this trip. I have and will continue to reach out to
                    > > friends to gauge their interest, but at this point in time it doesn't look
                    > > promising. Thus, the point of this post.
                    > > >
                    > > > Is anyone looking for a partner for a JMT thru hike this year? I would
                    > > like to go north - south, but other than that I have no real preferences.
                    > > Finishing the whole thing in 14ish days is the plan at this point, although
                    > > I will be taking off a full 3 weeks of vacation time from work to do this.
                    > > At this point I am just looking for interested parties and then we can take
                    > > the communication to email. If you have any questions, or want to talk about
                    > > potentially doing something together, please feel free to either respond
                    > > here or send me an email.
                    > > >
                    > > > Thanks!
                    > > > Greg
                    > > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                  • targetdoggmechanic
                    The reason why I started enjoying hiking is the solitude aspect of it. I like knowing the nearest person is miles away. I will stop and talk to people every
                    Message 9 of 13 , Dec 30, 2009
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                      The reason why I started enjoying hiking is the solitude aspect of it. I like knowing the nearest person is miles away. I will stop and talk to people every now and then, but even when my wife and I hike we keep about 50 or so yards away. I've done 2 JMT's both solo and planning another soon, which will be solo also. Some think differently about it, but IMO the JMT is one of the best our country has to offer and I wouldnt do it any other way. It's a pretty safe trail to do solo anyways, perhaps thats why I dont have any worries about being out there solo for 2-3 weeks at a time, you see someone at least once or twice a day minimum, depending when you hike it.

                      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, robert shattuck <bobolonius@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > If you really want to hike the trail, "solo" then just make it a point to stay, solo. if you think about it, you spend most of the day hiking in a somewhat solo fashion, even if you are with a small group––you're all spread out––at least I am, when I hike with others. I meet up with them at the end of the day.
                      > to stay solo, you can be as friendly as you want, but just keep your distance at the end of the day––don't camp with others . . . be faster than everyone else . . . be a jerk . . . carry a big knife . . . go faster or slower than those around you (I'm running out of "how to stay solo" options) ACT like the solo dude you are.
                      > I think people get it if you don't want to be around them. I do. And then again, maybe not––we all go out there with this grand idea of solitude and not dealing with people and then after a few days, we can't get enough of so-and-so.
                      > My first JMT was "solo" for the first three days and then I met a crazy math teacher from santa cruz. A 24/7 pot smoker and a super annoying, but did I leave him? No.
                      > Did I try to either get ahead or stay behind . . . did I think to just hide from him and let him go past me (not until I found two sweet old gals that suggested it) NO.
                      > If you do settle in with someone on the trail, choose wisely. The best thing about this guy was that he gave me lots of nervous energy and rage, which helped to hurry me down the trail and mostly, he was the reason I had to do it again.
                      > I think if I'd done that first JMT and it was a mellow, solo, soul-searching, physically unchallenging experience . . . I might have finished, ticked it off the list and never bothered again, but it wasn't and so I did.
                      > I haven't figured out what the perfect JMT is yet and I keep letting other people screw it up for me, so that I have to come back and do it again.
                      > Wait . . . it's coming . . . wait . . . the best advice in order to stay solo isn't so much staying away from people––it's just not letting yourself get sucked into anyone else's plans. Keep that distance.
                      > I always get out there and the next thing you know, you've befriended someone who has to be out on a certain date and suddenly you're sucked into their trip, their itinerary. stay away from other people's plans. simple.
                      >
                      > bob
                      > sparklefart.blogspot.com
                      > http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480
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                      > To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                      > From: hikejmt47@...
                      > Date: Wed, 30 Dec 2009 03:27:15 -0800
                      > Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: ISO JMT Partner 2010
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                      > Last year I started hiking alone but ended up with a partner very soon, I really enjoyed hiking with her but am left with the question........how do we say "just really want to hike alone for a while" .......you know, just a little awkward.
                      > Planing on doing the whole trail this year and have 4 weeks vacation saved up. I love reading these emails while dreaming of the trail.
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                      >
                      > From: Peter Burke <pburke@...>
                      > To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                      > Sent: Wed, December 23, 2009 9:39:05 AM
                      > Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: ISO JMT Partner 2010
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                      > > Although it is great to hike with a group of people and definitely
                      > > safer, the JMT is probably the one long hike that can be reasonably
                      > > done solo during the summer if you already have good hiking
                      > > experience. There are so many people on the trail in July and August
                      > > that you are never far from help.
                      > >
                      >
                      > FYI - I met more people in late September than July - almost everyone I
                      > talked to came in September because "they were trying to avoid the
                      > summer crowds"
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                      > So - extend that window of not being alone into the middle of September
                      > at the least. Also, that doesn't mean you will see "crowds." This year,
                      > I think the number of hikers on the JMT proper was about half of what I
                      > used to see in the late 80s. Last year, on July 17, between Palisade
                      > Creek and Upper Basin across Mather Pass, we didn't meet a single person
                      > on the JMT - nobody in
                      > peak season!
                      >
                      > Bottom line - you won't be alone, but don't be surprised if you find
                      > yourself alone for many hours of the day. Less and less people are
                      > actually traveling in the backcountry. Far more people used to go out
                      > there in the 70s and 80s. If you choose go on any alternate trails you
                      > will almost be guaranteed to be totally alone. Bring a SPOT or some
                      > other rescue beacon and enjoy the solitude.
                      >
                      > What usually happens on the JMT is that you more or less leapfrog the
                      > same people every day and find your companions that way, without being
                      > bound to hiking with anyone or compromise on speed and schedule.
                      >
                      > Peter
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                      > _________________________________________________________________
                      > Hotmail: Trusted email with Microsoft's powerful SPAM protection.
                      > http://clk.atdmt.com/GBL/go/177141664/direct/01/
                      >
                    • jckarpin
                      In 2008 I hiked northbound on the JMT which gave me the opportunity to pass all of the southbound hikers of which there were many. The busiest section (late
                      Message 10 of 13 , Dec 30, 2009
                      • 0 Attachment
                        In 2008 I hiked northbound on the JMT which gave me the opportunity to pass all of the southbound hikers of which there were many. The busiest section (late July) was between the Whitney turnoff north to the Kearsarge Pass trail that is about 20 miles. I lost count after 40. But a lot of them were doing the loop hike from Onion Valley to Whitney.

                        John Karpinski

                        > Bottom line - you won't be alone, but don't be surprised if you find
                        > yourself alone for many hours of the day. Less and less people are
                        > actually traveling in the backcountry. Far more people used to go out
                        > there in the 70s and 80s. If you choose go on any alternate trails you
                        > will almost be guaranteed to be totally alone. Bring a SPOT or some
                        > other rescue beacon and enjoy the solitude.
                        >
                        > What usually happens on the JMT is that you more or less leapfrog the
                        > same people every day and find your companions that way, without being
                        > bound to hiking with anyone or compromise on speed and schedule.
                        >
                        > Peter
                        >
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