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Re: [John Muir Trail] Pots and water cleansing

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  • Barbara Karagosian
    Sorry, hit send by mistake on last email. Anyway I m looking for the perfect lightweight water treatment still, one I can rely on. Any suggestions or peoples
    Message 1 of 36 , Sep 29 6:28 AM
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      Sorry, hit send by mistake on last email. 
      Anyway I'm looking for the perfect lightweight water treatment still, one I can rely on. Any suggestions or peoples favorites very welcome. I know Roleigh has had success with the Steripen, but it gives me the heebie  jeebies now!
      Thanks so much. 
      Barbara

      Sent from my iPhone. 

      On Sep 29, 2009, at 6:25 AM, Barbara Karagosian <barbara@...> wrote:

      Thanks got the suggestion about the pot bottom Don. Good idea. Re the water,I used to use an MSR Sweetwater filter which worked great but I was trying to lighten up. I used a Hyperflow last year which was useless and got returned. Way too slow. This year I toyed with a gravity filter but didn't trust it. Then I purchased a Steripen Adventurer which quit functioning at 1000 Island Lake. I sent it back and the company fixed it - something had come loose inside and was interfering with the contact.  I've used it since , on a 3 day trip, but don't trust it now either!  I always carry back up micropur tabs and have used them, tho strictly speakingbone is supposedctovwait 4 hours for them to work. Waiting 30 mins leaves a faint taste, waiting overnight Theres  no taste at all. Expensive for a long trip for 3 people tho. 

         

      Sent from my iPhone. 

      On Sep 28, 2009, at 9:01 PM, "don.amundson" <don.amundson@...> wrote:

       

      Back to this before I forget. Regarding the pot sliding off your stove. Try roughing up the bottom of the pot with sandpaper or a handy granite rock. I had a small fry pan for fish which moved around on my stove like it was on ball bearings. Once I roughed up the bottom it was like it was glued down. Question--what was your water cleansing issue? Don

      --- In johnmuirtrail@ yahoogroups. com, "Barbara Karagosian" <barbara@... > wrote:
      >
      > Don, thanks for the reply. Looking forward to reading all about your trip.
      > I'm already plotting for 2010 and reviewing gear issues while they're still
      > fresh in my mind. Is there anything you 9and everyone) found that didn't
      > work as well as hoped, or was a total success? Thanks so much.
      >
      >
      >
      > For me, failures/not as hoped were Montbell pillow (personal taste),
      > Steripen Adventurer (since replaced by manufacturer - something interfering
      > with a contact point - has worked OK on a later trip), and my 0.9L AGG pot
      > slides off my Snopeak stove way too easily! My 2L pot never had that issue.
      >
      >
      >
      > Great stuff were: Neoair, Big Agnes Copper Spur tent for 2 and for 3, GG
      > sheet that I used as a footprint, trash compacter bag as a pack liner (good
      > for falling off logs into streams, when a pack cover would not have been
      > effective), Crocs with Velcro heel fasteners for streams (after I gave up on
      > logs), my Catalyst pack except the sidepockets are too far back to get
      > anything out of when one is solo hiking, so I need to set up some sort of
      > front pack (even tho it has huge hip belt pockets) for snacks and water. My
      > hip pockets held map, Garmin Vista, reading glasses in hard case, jelly
      > beans, micropur tabs, and more. Also good - MH Phantom 15 down bag,
      > Montbell Inner down jacket (7 ozs).
      >
      >
      >
      > To be solved - water cleansing, and stove system. And also the perfect
      > raincoat (weight versus waterproofness versus breathability. Barbara
      >
      >
      >
      > _____
      >
      > From: johnmuirtrail@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@ yahoogroups. com]
      > On Behalf Of Don Amundson
      > Sent: Saturday, September 19, 2009 2:16 PM
      > To: johnmuirtrail@ yahoogroups. com
      > Subject: RE: [John Muir Trail] Alcohol Stove
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > OK Barbara, here is the list which I've included my eating system along with
      > the cooking stuff
      >
      >
      >
      > MSR .85L Titanium Kettle w/ lid 4.44oz.
      >
      > Coleman F1 Exponent stove w/ sack 2.82oz.
      >
      > GSI plastic mug/bowl 1.52oz.
      >
      > Sack to hold the above (also works as a wash basin) 1.12oz.
      >
      >
      >
      > Sea to summit long titanium spoon .5oz.
      >
      > Homemade cozy for food bag .74oz.
      >
      > Homemade cozy and foil lid for pot and mug .32oz.
      >
      >
      >
      > I use a mini bic lighter for the stove with the safety tab removed (much
      > easier to use with cold fingers) .4oz.
      >
      >
      >
      > All my meals are are cooked in freezer bags so all I am doing is heating
      > water. I usually heat three to four cups a day depending on what I have for
      > breakfast. I don't cook anything for lunch. There have been some tests which
      > show that having your canister stove turned on at less than full is more
      > efficient and I have found this to be true.
      >
      >
      >
      > I use a mini bic lighter for the stove with the safety tab removed (much
      > easier to use with cold fingers).
      >
      >
      >
      > My JetBoil user friend dehydrates her own food and cooks directly in the
      > JetBoil pot. Her meals tend to use a cup or less of water which you can heat
      > in a JetBoil super quick. Since the pot is used for cooking no cozies are
      > necessary. There is a lighter built into it, though you would normally carry
      > a lighter anyway. Plus under wind conditions the JetBoil performs very
      > well.
      >
      >
      >
      > What you do with your cooking stuff at night is a concern in bear country.
      > As room was available my cooking kit went in my bear canister. Before room
      > was available I just left it outside (clean off course). If a bear was
      > hungry enough to want to lick/eat a relatively clean pot he/she deserved to
      > have a go at it.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > PS answer--Awesome! For a more complete answer see my journal where I have
      > started to do trip entries www.trailjournals. com/don
      >
      >
      >
      > Don
      >
      >
      >
      > _____
      >
      > To: johnmuirtrail@ yahoogroups. com
      > From: barbara@...
      > Date: Fri, 18 Sep 2009 09:11:49 -0700
      > Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Alcohol Stove
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Please can u give details of yr cooking system Don? Also, for Jetboilers
      > out there, where do keep yr pot at night after you've cooked in it? Just
      > wash it and keep it away from yr bear cannister and tent? Thanks Barbara
      >
      >
      >
      > PS. How was the trip Don?
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Sent from my iPhone.
      >
      >
      > On Sep 18, 2009, at 7:58 AM, Don Amundson <amrowinc@hotmail.
      > <mailto:amrowinc@ ...> com> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Ed--a good source for stove information can be at the link below There
      > numerous other articles on the site regarding stoves including heat
      > exchanger models. My own preference is a canister stove (Coleman Exponet F1)
      > for ease of use, light weight and efficiency on longer hikes. I have a
      > couple of alcohol stoves which I have never used in the field after trying
      > them at home. One disadvantage for me is the inability to simmer. There are
      > alcohol stoves around which do have a simmer sleeve to control the flame. I
      > have never tried them personally. My recent hiking partner used a JetBoil
      > which she loves and which is very efficient. I'm into saving weight and
      > the jet boil has too big a weight penalty for my style. My whole cooking
      > system, including stove, bowl/drinking cup, pot, food cozy (no fuel) weighs
      > in at 9.58oz. The JetBoil is about 15oz. Alcohol stove systems are certainly
      > lighter but you reach a trade off point on longer range hikes due to the
      > fuel requirements. As Rich indicated experience is a factor. If you can try
      > out some systems and see what works for you. At minimum research online for
      > reviews by users and make an informed choice.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > <http://www.backpack inglight. com/cgi-bin/ backpackinglight /comparative_ fuel_e
      > fficiency_and_ weight_of_ stoves_pt1. html>
      > http://www.backpack inglight. com/cgi-bin/ backpackinglight /comparative_ fuel_ef
      > ficiency_and_ weight_of_ stoves_pt1. html
      >
      >
      > _____
      >
      >
      > To: johnmuirtrail@ yahoogroups. com
      > From: richehli@...
      > Date: Thu, 17 Sep 2009 21:09:27 -0400
      > Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Alcohol Stove
      >
      >
      >
      > Ed -
      > Except for some military models, most alcohol stoves cannot be
      > extinguished until the fuel is burned up. So you have to be familiar
      > with the stove's burn time per measure of fuel to heat a quantity of
      > water to a boil. Weight, size, durability and efficiency can vary
      > significantly among stoves. Some homemade stoves may be as efficient or
      > even more so than manufactured items. I have a Vargo Decagon stove. I
      > like the design a lot but I am not impressed by its performance. The
      > Brasslight stoves get generally good reviews on both weight and burn
      > efficiency but I have no personal experience with this name.To get a
      > more 'scientific' feel for efficiency and other performance differences
      > among manufactured stoves, BackpackGearTest [ <http://tiny. cc/wIbvq>
      > http://tiny. cc/wIbvq ]
      > might help to make a good choice. For information on homemade stoves,
      > one of many sources on the internet is SGT ROCK's Hiking H.Q. Other than
      > a competent stove and sufficient fuel, the most important factors are
      > experience (at least 30 meals) and a good windscreen. IMHO I would first
      > consider packing the highly efficient JetBoil or MSR Reactor stoves.
      > Rich
      >
      > ed_rodriguez52 wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > Ok every one looks like you guy are doing to make me put away my XGK
      > > stove. Now what I need to know what does the alcohol stove works. How
      > > do you simmer on it. What do I look for in the stove I know REI has
      > > the Trangia and Vargo. These stove will solve my weight and space
      > > concerns that I have. Am old school it will be hard to give up my XGK
      > > stove. Any information that you can give me will help me to make the
      > > right choose. Thanks Ed
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > _____
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    • Dale Stuart
      I too have a keg setup, but I use  Esbit fuel instead. Full tablet of fuel will boil 2 cups and 1/2 tablet does 1 cup.  I do 1 cup for b fast and 2 cups
      Message 36 of 36 , Jul 19, 2010
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        I too have a keg setup, but I use  Esbit fuel instead. Full tablet of fuel will boil 2 cups and 1/2 tablet does 1 cup.  I do 1 cup for b'fast and 2 cups for dinner meal.  Works great for me and limits total fuel use to 3/4 oz per day.
         
        Dale Stuart
        onetwolaugh@...
         
        Please strip out "replied-to" text if not necessary to your reply.  Failure to strip makes it hard for our Daily Digest members to find the new postings among the repeats.
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