Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [John Muir Trail] LA Get to Gether

Expand Messages
  • Barbara Karagosian
    I think a get-to-gether is a great idea Matt. I m sure there s others out there from LA. I live in Calabasas, and could meet anywhere in the Valley or West La,
    Message 1 of 21 , Sep 27, 2009
      I think a get-to-gether is a great idea Matt. I'm sure there's others out there from LA. I live in Calabasas, and could meet anywhere in the Valley or West La, or further afield of that's easier for others. Speak up, out there, let's do it!  Barbara

      Sent from my iPhone. 

      On Sep 27, 2009, at 9:43 PM, Matt Ruby <mattruby@...> wrote:

       

      This might be beating a dead horse because of all the great responses previously. 
      Here are some keys to success on the JMT, as I have found on my two JMT hikes in 2008 and this Aug/Sept.  Take it or leave it, but I have seen trips ended for all of these reasons.
       
      1.  Take your time.  Consider how much time off you have off.  I have seen many people attempt the entire trail in two weeks with a small success rate.  The more time you give yourself the higher your success rate will be.  I have seen hikers that look absolutely miserable doing a JMT death march so they can do the trail on a short schedule.  Are you hiking for fun/vacation?  10 miles a day, which in my opinion is a good pace, falls into three to four weeks to do the trail.  If you can't get that much time off consider doing the trail in sections.
       
      2.  Don't Carry Too Much.  This includes food.  It is reasonable for your pack to never weigh over 30 pounds, total pack weight including all food and water.  Mine topped out at 27 pounds after our resupply at MTR.  Thanks patt for the chance to weigh my pack.  Think outside the box to save weight.  Share a shelter, a bear canister, a water filter,etc.
       
      3. Solo is only for a certain type of person.  Go with a partner or find another solo hiker to pair up with on the hike.  Many solo hikers do not complete the trail for numerous reasons.
       
      4.  Keep your feet Dry to prevent blisters.  Liberal use of Gold Bond helps and liner socks.  Wet feet can shut down a trip in a hurry.  I avoid goretex due to breathability. 
       
      5.  Hike shorter mileage your first week or so.  Don't let yourself become too tired during the first part of the trip.  Many hikers overexert themselves in the first week and they end up injured, blistered or not mentally interested in continuing. 
       
      6.  Use Vitamin I, otherwise known as Ibprofen.
       
      7.  Be extra paranoid after using a cathole.  Use hand sanitizer and wash before eating.  Noone likes vomiting and diarrhea on trail.
       
      If anyone in the L.A. area wants to talk trail or gear.  I'd be interested in meeting up for a beer/coffee.
      Cheers,
      Matt
         
      --- On Mon, 9/28/09, margaret <magbag101@yahoo. com> wrote:

      From: margaret <magbag101@yahoo. com>
      Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Think'n bout the trip
      To: johnmuirtrail@ yahoogroups. com
      Date: Monday, September 28, 2009, 1:56 AM

       
      --- In johnmuirtrail@ yahoogroups. com, Sean Mahoney <cutlassdude70@ ...> wrote:
      >
      > Those aren't ridiculous questions at all. In fact, it's great that you're
      > starting your planning now. I agree with the advice of others though to
      > start getting more backpacking experience as soon as possible. Dayhiking is
      > a great way to condition (and I highly recommend it), but backpacking is
      > almost like a whole other ball game. There's quite a bit of new information
      > (and gear) that comes along when you're staying out for more than a single
      > day. People in this group offer awesome advice, but many gear choices are
      > so individual that only you will know what works best after trying out the
      > options. That being said, posting to this group is probably the best way to
      > start! :) Try to get out and hike as much as possible for conditioning,
      > especially with enough weight on your back to simulate a full pack. There's
      > no better way to condition your muscles for hiking than hiking. The more
      > uneven the terrain, the better. :D
      >
      > Numerous people in this group will gladly share their gear recommendations,
      > and you can use that information to try and figure out what type of gear may
      > work best for you. As soon as you have all the backpacking essentials, get
      > out there (preferably with someone who has backpacked before) and try it
      > out! The more experience you can get before next summer, the better. If
      > you don't know anyone in your area with backpacking experience, you may even
      > want to look for a local backpacking course (if available). <shameless
      > promotion>If you're in the Southern California area, there's an awesome
      > Wilderness Travel Course (http://www.wilderne sstravelcourse. org/) offered by
      > the Angeles Chapter of the Sierra Club. I was a student in the course at
      > one point and am now an instructor. In my opinion, it's probably one of the
      > best in So Cal. If you plan on taking it though, sign up soon because it
      > fills quick!</shameless promotion>
      >
      > If you don't already have experience reading topo maps, that would also be a
      > great skill to pick up before next summer. Even though you'll be on-trail,
      > the signage at some points isn't 100% clear (i.e. not every sign tells you
      > which way the JMT goes at a junction). Reading topo maps will also help you
      > determine where you are relative to water sources (which are abundant) and
      > everything else. Additionally, being able to read over detailed topo maps
      > while planning your daily mileages beforehand is incredibly useful. It's
      > nice to know ahead of time where the most difficult sections will be. :)
      >
      > As far as mileage goes, I would recommend taking the most leisurely pace
      > possible given the amount of time you can take off. If you can take a whole
      > month to do the trail, I'd highly recommend doing so. Also try and take a
      > few rest days in there. My girlfriend and I (both experienced backpackers)
      > made an attempt about a month ago to hike the trail in 18 days. The various
      > daily mileages seemed fine on paper, but we ended up having to exit early
      > after 4 days and about 55 miles at Mammoth due to her experiencing major
      > knee problems. Admittedly she had tore her ACL years ago in a car accident
      > and re-injured the same knee while climbing Mt. Pickering a few weeks before
      > we left, but my point is that the trail is a major challenge and you should
      > take a slow enough pace to avoid pushing your body too far. Besides, the
      > slower you go the more you can enjoy the views. :D
      >
      > My other piece of advice is to go with the lightest set of gear that you
      > feel comfortable with. I'm a huge fan of ultralight backpacking, but feel
      > it's even more important that someone be perfectly comfortable with every
      > piece of their gear. If there's an ultralight gear option you consider at
      > some point but don't feel you'll be as safe with it, it's better to go with
      > a heavier option that you feel better about at that point in time. That
      > being said, I've found that reducing my pack weight (without sacrificing any
      > essentials) has done more for my backpacking comfort than nearly anything
      > else (with the possible exception of conditioning itself). Since you need
      > to start getting backpacking experience soon and need gear to start
      > backpacking, I figure it's worth mentioning now. I'm sure others in this
      > group will be happy to share their gear recommendations as well, but the
      > gear lists for that JMT "section hike" I took with my girlfriend this year
      > can be found at http://sites. google.com/ site/jmtplanner2 009/
      >
      > Sean
      >
      thank you!! actually i do live in so cal and i may actually end up doing the wilderness travel course thank you it seems very cool and exactly what i need!!
      >


      Recent Activity
    • Dan Kronstadt
      I am far from doing JMT - just starting to camp - but would love to sit in on a discussion. I am in the east San Fern Valley - but can go pretty much anywhere
      Message 2 of 21 , Sep 27, 2009
        I am far from doing JMT - just starting to camp - but would love to sit in on a discussion. I am in the east San Fern Valley - but can go pretty much anywhere in LA.

        Dan

        Barbara Karagosian wrote:
        I think a get-to-gether is a great idea Matt. I'm sure there's others out there from LA. I live in Calabasas, and could meet anywhere in the Valley or West La, or further afield of that's easier for others. Speak up, out there, let's do it!  Barbara

        Sent from my iPhone. 
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.