Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Training

Expand Messages
  • eddie
    I know I have to loss weight and get myself in shape to hike the JMT next year. What my plan was to hit the bike trail on the weekend with my pack on (there is
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 27, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      I know I have to loss weight and get myself in shape to hike the JMT next year. What my plan was to hit the bike trail on the weekend with my pack on (there is this stretch that has a fell hills) go to my local track and do hill work and laps work with my pack. I don't like gyms nor have the $ for that. Was looking at starting in march or April for my hike in july. How and what do you people do to get ready. Thanks Ed
    • Maxim
      Pack will increase load on knee & spine.... Just run every second day and increase time from week to week. Hill hikes/runs on weekend will be a big plus. On
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 29, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Pack will increase load on knee & spine.... Just run every second day and increase time from week to week. Hill hikes/runs on weekend will be a big plus. On winter you can add snowshoe or cross-country ski.

        Trail running will provide you more load and it's softer than road running.

        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "eddie" <ed_rodriguez52@...> wrote:
        >
        > I know I have to loss weight and get myself in shape to hike the JMT next year. What my plan was to hit the bike trail on the weekend with my pack on (there is this stretch that has a fell hills) go to my local track and do hill work and laps work with my pack. I don't like gyms nor have the $ for that. Was looking at starting in march or April for my hike in july. How and what do you people do to get ready. Thanks Ed
        >
      • John Ladd
        Eddie -- I like your plan. My opinion is that training effects are very specific - they best way to train for walking hills with a pack is to walk hills with a
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 2, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Eddie --

          I like your plan.

          My opinion is that training effects are very specific - they best way to train for walking hills with a pack is to walk hills with a pack.  Cross-training (running, biking, etc.) is great as an addition to practicing what you actually plan to do, but unless you have a ton of time to work out, I'd concentrate on practicing what you will actually do.  I did a fair amount of competitive sports in my younger days and some coaching and I'm a strong believer in exercise specificity.

          "The Specificity Principle simply states that exercising a certain body part or component of the body primarily develops that part. The Principle of Specificity implies that, to become better at a particular exercise or skill, you must perform that exercise or skill. A runner should train by running, a swimmer by swimming and a cyclist by cycling. While it's helpful to have a good base of fitness and to do general conditioning routines, if you want to be better at your sport, you need to train specifically for that sport."

          from
          Exercise Science - The Science Behind Your Workout
          How to Get the Most From Your Workout
          http://sportsmedicine.about.com/od/training/a/Ex-Science.htm

          To avoid looking silly carrying a full pack, I take a day pack and fill it with wrenches, lead weights, tire chains, full water bottles etc.  I start at about 15-20 lbs and gradually get it up to at least my base weight (25-27) and maybe my full start weight (35-37).  And then I hike up and over ridges.  I'm lucky to have plenty of them available (I live in the City of SF).  I have a 4 mile loop route from my front door which will give me 1100+ ft of vertical climb and (obviously) the same amount of drop in about 1:20.  (I checked the aggregate vertical change with an altimeter).  I start with a somewhat shorter version of the route 3 times a week and try to work up to the full route at least once a day.  I'll do it just before bed with a headlamp if necessary.

          I try to find irregular surfaces so that I can build up the accessory muscles - I try to use alleys and trails and steps rather than sidewalks and streets.  Even in the City, I can find them for well over 50% of my route.

          In order to "overstress" a bit, I carry a pair of 4 lb hand weights which I figure duplicate some of the stress of using trekking poles (I feel silly using them in the city).  And I tend to walk faster in training than I will on trail.

          I try to get started on this routine at least 2 months before a long trip, preferably more.  Once I start my trip, I find this amount of conditioning leaves me feeling pretty comfortable with 12 mile days and able to do 17 as needed, despite a slightly advanced age (63).  The altitude and higher pack weight of the real trail make the work harder, but I don't have to walk as fast and I have all day to get my 12 miles in.

          John Curran Ladd
          1616 Castro Street
          San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
          415-648-9279
        • Roleigh Martin
          John, I m jealous of you being able to have such an urban walking environment that lets you mimic mountain hiking. We (in the Twin Cities, MN) have a state
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 2, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            John, I'm jealous of you being able to have such an urban walking environment that lets you mimic mountain hiking.  We (in the Twin Cities, MN) have a state park (Afton State Park) 35 miles away that has 20 miles of hiking with lots of hills (although maybe not as steep as San Francisco), and on good weekends, I'll hike there and sleep overnight in one of the backpacking camps there.  On 3 day weekends, I go up to the Superior Hiking trail and do a 2.5 day hike on the SHT.  But I can't approximate anything daily like you can.  Lucky you.

            On Fri, Oct 2, 2009 at 2:08 PM, John Ladd <johnladd@...> wrote:


            Eddie --

            I like your plan.

            My opinion is that training effects are very specific - they best way to train for walking hills with a pack is to walk hills with a pack.  Cross-training (running, biking, etc.) is great as an addition to practicing what you actually plan to do, but unless you have a ton of time to work out, I'd concentrate on practicing what you will actually do.  I did a fair amount of competitive sports in my younger days and some coaching and I'm a strong believer in exercise specificity.
            ...
          • skdupre
            Of course, we are all on different schedules, are hiking different hikes, and probably look different too. I will average 10 miles per day w/ one zero day and
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 8, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              Of course, we are all on different schedules, are hiking different hikes, and probably look different too. I will average 10 miles per day w/ one zero day and will be doing a lot of photography. I am 45 (5'8", 165 lbs) and joined a gym for the first time in my life last year. I work out 5 days a week (steady 30-40 minute alternating cardio w/ weights).

              Ok, you asked so here it is ( July 10' JMT). Treadmill: Level 9 progressing to level 12 by the end of June. Progressing pack weight from 10 - 35 pounds (late June). Shifting speed from 2 - 3 mph to build muscle. Building up to 60 - 90 minutes. Alternate treadmill w/ weights focusing on lower body and adding some upper body. Lower body w/ leg presses, squats, and lunges along w/ flutter kicks, side kicks, and bicycle kicks. Backpack 5-10 miles on the weekends. Final shake out in June; 6 day 60 mile trip (Arkansas) w/ no resupply. That will tell me if I'm ready or not, but hey, I've already booked my flights, lodging, and bus tickets....

              There's a good article in the Oct. issue of Backpacker "Build a Thru-Hiker Body" (p. 55) that I got some good ideas from.

              Bottom line; I always like to try and put myself through (as close as I can in East Texas) the toughest condition of what I will face on the trail. Sure, it's hard to duplicate the Grand Canyon where I'm from and certainly impossible to match the altitude of the High Sierras so you just have to push yourself to level where you know you'll be prepared.

              Hope to see you on the trail!

              skd

              --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Roleigh Martin <roleigh@...> wrote:
              >
              > John, I'm jealous of you being able to have such an urban walking
              > environment that lets you mimic mountain hiking. We (in the Twin Cities,
              > MN) have a state park (Afton State Park) 35 miles away that has 20 miles of
              > hiking with lots of hills (although maybe not as steep as San Francisco),
              > and on good weekends, I'll hike there and sleep overnight in one of the
              > backpacking camps there. On 3 day weekends, I go up to the Superior Hiking
              > trail and do a 2.5 day hike on the SHT. But I can't approximate anything
              > daily like you can. Lucky you.
              >
              > On Fri, Oct 2, 2009 at 2:08 PM, John Ladd <johnladd@...> wrote:
              >
              > >
              > >
              > > Eddie --
              > >
              > > I like your plan.
              > >
              > > My opinion is that training effects are very specific - they best way to
              > > train for walking hills with a pack is to walk hills with a pack.
              > > Cross-training (running, biking, etc.) is great as an *addition* to
              > > practicing what you actually plan to do, but unless you have a ton of time
              > > to work out, I'd concentrate on practicing what you will actually do. I did
              > > a fair amount of competitive sports in my younger days and some coaching and
              > > I'm a strong believer in exercise specificity.
              > > ...
              > >
              >
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.