Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [John Muir Trail] Historical Temperature Data?

Expand Messages
  • egerber
    The Sieras are the mildest, most weather consistent mountain range in the world but there are no guaruntees. I was cross country hiking north of Toulomne 10
    Message 1 of 24 , Aug 31, 2009
      The Sieras are the mildest, most weather consistent mountain range in the world but there are no guaruntees. I was cross country hiking north of Toulomne 10 years ago in early September and had two nights of 0-5 degree weather. I was unprepared and paid for it. Since then, I take a zero degree, down Marmot bag. The difference in weight between a zero degree rating and a 20 degree rating is nominal and I have never been cold since then. You can always unzip a hot bag but have no options with a cold bag.

      Eric

      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "beegfut" <richehli@...> wrote:
      >
      > Bob - You may have a point. I have camped in the Adirondack forest in February with temps around -30F. Of course, I needed a heck of a lot more equipment to do that comfortably than I could afford to take on a three-week backpack. Basically, my motivation is that I don't want any really unpleasant surprises that can be avoided by careful planning. Minor unpleasantness is always expected and is what makes the sport interesting. The more info the better but if there are gaps so be it. I am expecting normal highs and lows of 60's and 30's, respectively, together with some days in the 70-50's and nights between 40-20's. I'm carrying an REI Subkilo bag, heavy weight fleece long johns, and a Go-Lite down sweater for camp wear. My shelter is a Eureka Spitfire 1 person tent and my luxury item is a 14 oz. stadium seat. Maximum pack weight will be around 45#s. Maybe a little excessive but it's an insurance premium I'm willing to pay for comfortable camps.
      >
      > My partner is carrying essentially the same gear but to compensate for a heavier food haul he is going with a light weight bivy and silnylon tarp for his shelter to shave a pound or two off his pack weight. I know he can handle it but I don't think he'll like it after a day or two. Of course, I have to watch him eat those extra rations. :>)
      >
      > Rich
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, robert shattuck <bobolonius@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > Rich,
      > > You seem to be going through a lot of trouble to figure out that it will be colder in September––certainly at night. It's kind of a given. Days will vary––some being cooler than others, but in my experiences, doing the trail in mid-september required no more clothing than it did in august. You'll get a little more frost on your bag/tent in the morning. maybe a few sprinkles, but you shouldn't need . . . more than the basics to get you through . . .
      > >
      > > bob
      > > http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480
      > >
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.