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Re: bear canister and gloves

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  • hmdsierra
    I ve been up twice and never used gloves. Neither did my son or my friend. I had no problem being barehanded.
    Message 1 of 14 , Aug 3, 2009
      I've been up twice and never used gloves. Neither did my son or my friend. I had no problem being barehanded.

      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Patricia Rider <prider09@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi all again,
      > Can any of you who have climbed Half Dome say whether gloves are necessary (to help with the cables) or not? Also, how is everyone carrying their bear canister? I loaded it up and put it on top of my pack where I can anchor it securely, but feels "heavy" up there. Have never used one of these before so wonder where's the best place to put it. I have an Osprey internal frame backpack. If I try to put it in my backpack I won't have room for much else.
      > Thanks,
      > Patty
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Rich Ehli
      AFAIK there is no rule that you must carry the food inside the bear cannister while hiking. Only that you store it there when in camp. The heavier items are
      Message 2 of 14 , Aug 3, 2009
        AFAIK there is no rule that you must carry the food inside the bear
        cannister while hiking. Only that you store it there when in camp. The
        heavier items are best loaded up high but I can see where a loaded
        cannister strapped to the top of your pack might be unstable. You might
        consider carrying the food in the more conventional arrangement, in
        stuff sacks at the top of your pack, while placing your clothes and
        sleeping bag inside the cannister in the space below.

        Rich

        Patricia Rider wrote:
        >
        >
        > Hi all again,
        > Can any of you who have climbed Half Dome say whether gloves are
        > necessary (to help with the cables) or not? Also, how is everyone
        > carrying their bear canister? I loaded it up and put it on top of my
        > pack where I can anchor it securely, but feels "heavy" up there. Have
        > never used one of these before so wonder where's the best place to put
        > it. I have an Osprey internal frame backpack. If I try to put it in my
        > backpack I won't have room for much else.
        > Thanks,
        > Patty
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
      • Steve Schauer
        Gloves: I found some nitrile gardening gloves at the local Ace hardware, and I called them my Spiderman gloves because they gripped so well. They were about
        Message 3 of 14 , Aug 3, 2009
          Gloves: I found some nitrile gardening gloves at the local Ace hardware, and I called them my Spiderman gloves because they gripped so well. They were about $5. They are essential for the cables. 
          For packing the canister: I also have the Osprey internal frame pack. I put the canister upright in the middle compartment, and pack everything else around it. I hike with my husband, so we share items like tent and stove, first aid kit, camera and tripod. I don't bring much extra clothing. As the canister empties, I pack my stove and cooking gear in the canister. It worked out well.

          --- On Mon, 8/3/09, Bill Plesha <backpackerman@...> wrote:

          From: Bill Plesha <backpackerman@...>
          Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] bear canister and gloves
          To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Monday, August 3, 2009, 1:44 PM













           





          Patty,



          Gloves are a good idea on the cables. Generally, there are spare gloves at the base, but to be safe, I'd bring along a pair.



          Regarding the bear canister it really should go inside your pack. As you said, putting it on top will make you top heavy (even though some of the photos will show it mounted on top).



          I actually had to go out and buy a new, larger pack to accomodate my canister for my upcoming trip.



          Ideally, you would want to have it in your pack lying on its side near the bottom (say above your sleeping bag). If it won't go in sideways then standing up would be the second best alternative.



          Good Luck,



          Bill P.

          ----- Original Message -----

          From: Patricia Rider

          To: johnmuirtrail@ yahoogroups. com

          Sent: Monday, August 03, 2009 1:34 PM

          Subject: [John Muir Trail] bear canister and gloves



          Hi all again,

          Can any of you who have climbed Half Dome say whether gloves are necessary (to help with the cables) or not? Also, how is everyone carrying their bear canister? I loaded it up and put it on top of my pack where I can anchor it securely, but feels "heavy" up there. Have never used one of these before so wonder where's the best place to put it. I have an Osprey internal frame backpack. If I try to put it in my backpack I won't have room for much else.

          Thanks,

          Patty



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

































          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • cjoslyn99
          Definitely bring some gloves. Don t trust that there will be a supply at the bottom of the cables or that you d want to wear them afterwards (bacteria, viri
          Message 4 of 14 , Aug 3, 2009
            Definitely bring some gloves. Don't trust that there will be a supply at the bottom of the cables or that you'd want to wear them afterwards (bacteria, viri and whatever yuk). A good set of gardening gloves with sticky grips work well (either the ones w/ rubber dots or better yet rubberized over the whole hand).

            As for bear can, it really depends on the size of your pack and weight distribution. I have a Bear Vault (BV-500) and it fits horizontally inside my Gregory z65. It sits up towards the top of my pack but not so high or so far back that it alters my center of gravity too much (i.e., no tippy-ness). Makes for easy access too. That's actually one of the reasons I bought the Gregory over the Osprey Atmos (which made me feel like I was being pulled backwards). You may need to experiment a bit to figure out where the can fits you best for your Osprey, but if you can get it centered in the upper shoulderblade area, that would probably do the trick. If not, better for it to feel a bit heavy on top than to be off balance.

            --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Patricia Rider <prider09@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi all again,
            > Can any of you who have climbed Half Dome say whether gloves are necessary (to help with the cables) or not? Also, how is everyone carrying their bear canister? I loaded it up and put it on top of my pack where I can anchor it securely, but feels "heavy" up there. Have never used one of these before so wonder where's the best place to put it. I have an Osprey internal frame backpack. If I try to put it in my backpack I won't have room for much else.
            > Thanks,
            > Patty
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Peter Burke
            No rule what you do with the food when it is not unattended. If you pack it loose in the backpack during the day, you have to make sure the pack is never
            Message 5 of 14 , Aug 4, 2009
              No rule what you do with the food when it is not unattended. If you pack
              it loose in the backpack during the day, you have to make sure the pack
              is never unattended. For half the Muir Trail, the canister itself isn't
              even required, although once you get used to not having to pick your
              camps based on trees suitable for hanging, you'll probably bring the
              canister anyway.

              I usually pack my canister in the upper compartment and use tent and
              clothing to position it in that area. Once the content shrinks other
              stuff like pots and pans and stove move into the top of the bear can to
              keep the heavier items near the top of the pack


              Rich Ehli wrote:
              >
              >
              > AFAIK there is no rule that you must carry the food inside the bear
              > cannister while hiking. Only that you store it there when in camp. The
              > heavier items are best loaded up high but I can see where a loaded
              > cannister strapped to the top of your pack might be unstable. You might
              > consider carrying the food in the more conventional arrangement, in
              > stuff sacks at the top of your pack, while placing your clothes and
              > sleeping bag inside the cannister in the space below.
              >
              > Rich
              >

              >
              >
            • mm03g
              I have the Osprey Aether 70 (medium) and a large-size BearVault fits perfectly in the lower compartment sideways
              Message 6 of 14 , Aug 4, 2009
                I have the Osprey Aether 70 (medium) and a large-size BearVault fits perfectly in the lower compartment sideways

                --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Patricia Rider <prider09@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi all again,
                > Can any of you who have climbed Half Dome say whether gloves are necessary (to help with the cables) or not? Also, how is everyone carrying their bear canister? I loaded it up and put it on top of my pack where I can anchor it securely, but feels "heavy" up there. Have never used one of these before so wonder where's the best place to put it. I have an Osprey internal frame backpack. If I try to put it in my backpack I won't have room for much else.
                > Thanks,
                > Patty
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