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my bad-ass bear killin' knife

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  • robert shattuck
    Seems I ve run across the hot-topic of what kind of knife do you carry? a few times and we all want one for the multitude of perceived tasks, such as
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 2, 2009
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      Seems I've run across the hot-topic of "what kind of knife do you carry?" a few times and we all want one for the multitude of perceived tasks, such as chopping trees and my personal favorite, defending ourselves from bears��but I think most of us use our burly knives for little more than moleskin, duct-tape and packaging.
      Sorting through a few things today, I realized that it was time to go to the local (I get them at Kinokuniya, in Japantown) art supply store and buy a few more of my favorite retractable exacto-blade knives. I love the "OLFA TOUCH-KNIFE"
      http://olfablades.stores.yahoo.net/touch.html


      it's about as big as a dollar coin, weight-less and the blade is spring-loaded, AND WORKS.
      It also has a small hole, which I run a short (4 inches?? ) piece of cord through, so that I can better locate the blade when it's lost in my top pocket, or pants and I've found the cord helps when I am wearing gloves, as far as pulling it out of pockets . . .
      . . . The best thing about it though is the element of surprise. If you've got your big bowie knife out when you're charging at that bear, he's gonna see you coming, but if you use this little Olfa, you'll just surprise the Grizz and by then it'll be too late for him.
      back to packing.
      bob
      http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480




      _________________________________________________________________
      Get back to school stuff for them and cashback for you.
      http://www.bing.com/cashback?form=MSHYCB&publ=WLHMTAG&crea=TEXT_MSHYCB_BackToSchool_Cashback_BTSCashback_1x1

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • John Ladd
      I love Bob Shattuck s idea of the small knife and think I ll get one of these as a spare. While I ve never lost a knife on trail, I d hate to. I ve always
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 2, 2009
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        I love Bob Shattuck's idea of the small knife and think I'll get one
        of these as a spare. While I've never lost a knife on trail, I'd hate
        to. I've always carried a single-sided razor blade as an emergency
        knife replacement, and for first aid purposes, but I like Bob's idea
        better.

        The only reason I need a bigger standard knife than Bob's highly
        efficient suggestion is that I cook in ways that require me to slice
        meat, usually a hard sausage (or my beloved lardo) or hard cheese.
        For this purpose I like a lightweight kitchen paring knife.

        I particularly like this knife which costs under $10, is lightweight,
        comes with a scabbard and is so colorful that I'm unlikely to ever
        leave it behind. You can buy it at your local Sur Le Table or order
        it online.

        http://www.surlatable.com/product/cutlery/paring+%26+utility+knives/kuhn+rikon+paring+knives.do?sortby=ourPicks

        (PS: If you are interested in lardo, (aka proscuitto bianco) see

        http://www.boccalone.com/Products/Cured-Meats

        It is highly efficient to carry (200+ calories/oz), very stable on
        trail and. if minced, a good addition to any basic dinner, especially
        those of the rice-and-beans variety. It's would be a good addition to
        most commercial freeze-dried meals. More on lardo later.)

        John Ladd


        Bob's posting:
        I love the "OLFA TOUCH-KNIFE"
        > http://olfablades.stores.yahoo.net/touch.html
        >
        > it's about as big as a dollar coin, weight-less and the blade is spring-loaded, AND WORKS.
        ...
      • dc t
        Though it s not the lightest thing in the world, I have always used the Swiss Army knife. I have always carried one during all of my back pack ventures and
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 2, 2009
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          Though it's not the lightest thing in the world, I have always used the Swiss Army knife. I have always carried one during all of my back pack ventures and deployments in hostile fire zones and it has proven invaluable over the past 3 1/2 decades. I have one that my granddad gave me when I was eleven. It has scizzors, saw blade, awl, wire stripper, phillips and flat head screw drivers and two blades. Though I don't see much use for a screw driver on the JMT, the awl, saw and scissors have been used extensively for emergency repairs.

          --- On Sun, 8/2/09, John Ladd <johnladd@...> wrote:


          From: John Ladd <johnladd@...>
          Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] my bad-ass bear killin' knife
          To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Sunday, August 2, 2009, 6:04 PM


           



          I love Bob Shattuck's idea of the small knife and think I'll get one
          of these as a spare. While I've never lost a knife on trail, I'd hate
          to. I've always carried a single-sided razor blade as an emergency
          knife replacement, and for first aid purposes, but I like Bob's idea
          better.

          The only reason I need a bigger standard knife than Bob's highly
          efficient suggestion is that I cook in ways that require me to slice
          meat, usually a hard sausage (or my beloved lardo) or hard cheese.
          For this purpose I like a lightweight kitchen paring knife.

          I particularly like this knife which costs under $10, is lightweight,
          comes with a scabbard and is so colorful that I'm unlikely to ever
          leave it behind. You can buy it at your local Sur Le Table or order
          it online.

          http://www.surlatab le.com/product/ cutlery/paring+ %26+utility+ knives/kuhn+ rikon+paring+ knives.do? sortby=ourPicks

          (PS: If you are interested in lardo, (aka proscuitto bianco) see

          http://www.boccalon e.com/Products/ Cured-Meats

          It is highly efficient to carry (200+ calories/oz) , very stable on
          trail and. if minced, a good addition to any basic dinner, especially
          those of the rice-and-beans variety. It's would be a good addition to
          most commercial freeze-dried meals. More on lardo later.)

          John Ladd

          Bob's posting:
          I love the "OLFA TOUCH-KNIFE"
          > http://olfablades. stores.yahoo. net/touch. html
          >
          > it's about as big as a dollar coin, weight-less and the blade is spring-loaded, AND WORKS.
          ...


















          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • John Ladd
          Inspired by Bob s quest for the smallest piece of equipment that does the job, I just found a nifty solution to a problem that s been in the back of my mind. I
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 4, 2009
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            Inspired by Bob's quest for the smallest piece of equipment that does
            the job, I just found a nifty solution to a problem that's been in the
            back of my mind.

            I don't carry much of a tool kit and on my recent trip I found myself
            borrowing a Swiss Army Knife to tighten the tension-adjusting screw on
            my lever-style trekking poles (Black Diamonds). One pole was not
            quite tight enough and I worried that it might collapse if I suddenly
            thrust weight on it. (There are 2 of the adjusting screws on each
            pole)

            I usually bring a dime and a quarter with me, and they solve most
            screwdriver needs, but the adjusting screws on the poles were not
            sized right for this solution.

            While I can always count on my fellow hikers on the JMT, I travel some
            obscure trails at times, so I wanted to find something that would
            allow me to tighten that particular screw. And it seemed excessive to
            carry a small screwdriver.

            So, finally, I come to the solution.

            I went to my local hardware store and found that a "speed nut" costing
            pennies and weighing nothing that just fit the screw hole perfectly.
            (And it takes almost no torque to adjust the screw with the lever
            open.) It was so small that the big problem was how not to lose the
            nut. So I taped it to the trekking pole itself with some clear Duct
            Tape. That way, if I have my trekking ople, I always have a
            "screwdriver" to adjust it.

            For those of you who don't know what a speed nut is, here's a link to a picture.

            http://www.rubbertherightway.com/new%20web%20pics/Flat%20Speed%20Nut.png

            They are the little flat, arched pieces of thin (usually black) sheet
            metal that can form a quick attachment to a machine screw. Your
            hardware store should have them in various sizes and you could find
            one to fit almost any screw you might need to tighten on trail. Note,
            however, that they would work poorly for screws that require a lot of
            torque to tighten. I don't think I have any other screws in my usual
            equipment, so I jsut needed the one.

            John Curran Ladd
            1616 Castro Street
            San Francisco, CA 94114-3707
            415-648-9279



            On Sun, Aug 2, 2009 at 12:47 PM, robert shattuck<bobolonius@...> wrote:
            >
            > Seems I've run across the hot-topic of "what kind of knife do you carry?"  a few times and we all want one for the multitude of perceived tasks, such as chopping trees and my personal favorite, defending ourselves from bears末but I think most of us use our burly knives for little more than moleskin, duct-tape and packaging.
            > Sorting through a few things today, I realized that it was time to go to the local (I get them at Kinokuniya, in Japantown) art supply store and buy a few more of my favorite retractable exacto-blade knives. I love the "OLFA TOUCH-KNIFE"
            > http://olfablades.stores.yahoo.net/touch.html
            >
            >
            > it's about as big as a dollar coin, weight-less and the blade is spring-loaded, AND WORKS.
            > It also has a small hole, which I run a short  (4 inches?? ) piece of cord through, so that I can better locate the blade when it's lost in my top pocket, or pants and I've found the cord helps when I am wearing gloves, as far as pulling it out of pockets . . .
            > . . . The best thing about it though is the element of surprise. If you've got your big bowie knife out when you're charging at that bear, he's gonna see you coming, but if you use this little Olfa, you'll just surprise the Grizz and by then it'll be too late for him.
            > back to packing.
            > bob
            > http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > _________________________________________________________________
            > Get back to school stuff for them and cashback for you.
            > http://www.bing.com/cashback?form=MSHYCB&publ=WLHMTAG&crea=TEXT_MSHYCB_BackToSchool_Cashback_BTSCashback_1x1
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
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