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Re: [John Muir Trail] Last minute questions before my trip to JMT

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  • song95139@sbcglobal.net
    Hi Kevin, The weather can can be have a wide range in the High Sierra.  Temperature can drop down to 30 degrees at night and rise to 90 degrees in the day. 
    Message 1 of 16 , Jul 1, 2009
      Hi Kevin,

      The weather can can be have a wide range in the High Sierra.  Temperature can drop down to 30 degrees at night and rise to 90 degrees in the day.  It can also be windy if you camp at higher elevation and thus making it feel much colder.  You can encounter thunder storms. 

      Missing on your list I notice is the rain gear. Raingear can be doubled as wind breaker if needed.  Also a pair of gloves.  It kept my fingers warm at night. 

      Here is what I brought on my trip last year.

      1 pair underwear - wash it while at camp or resorts.
      2 pair wool socks - 1 for sleeping and 1 for hiking.  alternate and dry the wet one on the backpack or overnight.
      1 set of thermal top and pants - only for sleeping.
      1 long sleeve shirt for sleeping
      1 fleece shirt and pants for warmed and sleeping when cold.
      1 hiking shirt
      1 Polyester T shirt
      1 pair cotton glove
      1 beanie - keeping my head warm
      1 wide brim hat
      1 rain gear top only - ripstop type

      I was warm sleeping in a 40 degree sleeping bag under a rain fly.

      Keep you clothing dry.  I use a zip lock bag for all my clothing and sleeping bag for just in case I slip while crossing streams. 

      Enjoy yourself and I will join you in three weeks.

      Sim







      --- On Wed, 7/1/09, Kevin Balla <hikingjmt@...> wrote:

      From: Kevin Balla <hikingjmt@...>
      Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Last minute questions before my trip to JMT
      To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Wednesday, July 1, 2009, 10:26 AM

















      Thanks for that, I thought so. Well I head out tomorrow (so excited about it!) and have one last question, this time about the clothes I packed. For now, I'm taking some light clothes but I'm not sure how cold it gets up at Donahue Pass at night (11,500 ft, the highest point I'll be reaching). To keep warm I'm taking a thermal top/bottom and a long sleeve shirt, but should I be taking a fleece with me too?



      Here's what I'm packing for the 7day trip:

      -4 underwear (includes 1 thermal)

      -2 wool socks

      -1 hiking pant

      -2 long sleeve shirts (includes 1 thermal)

      -2 short sleeve shirts



      Does this sound too light? Lastly, is there a reliable forecast website for the northern part of the JMT (Postpile to Happy Isles)?



      I really appreciate everyone's input up till now, I'll be sure to write back about my experience up there!



      Kevin



      ____________ _________ _________ __

      From: hmdsierra <no_reply@yahoogroup s.com>

      To: johnmuirtrail@ yahoogroups. com

      Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 2:37:54 PM

      Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Last minute questions before my trip to JMT



      I know bears have good noses but sometimes I wonder. I cookwith bacon grease and don't wash the frypan until I'm ready to move along unless I cook fish and get it real dirty. If there is a nail in a tree I hang it there,if not then invert it on a log or rock. I have never had it licked clean, even at Vidette when i had to chase bears away. At time dinner is so late that I leave the dishes till morning to wash, aways from camp. They have never been cleaned either.



      --- In johnmuirtrail@ yahoogroups. com, dc t <dc_t63@...> wrote:

      >

      > There may be several schools of thought on this, but bears have very sensitive noses and hiding canisters wont really do you any good. I typically just set them away from the camp. Also, anything used to prepare the food with as well as eating utensils need to be away from your camp as well. As far as the packs go, I always covered them up with a poncho during the night.

      >

      > --- On Tue, 6/30/09, Kevin Balla <hikingjmt@. ..> wrote:

      >

      >

      > From: Kevin Balla <hikingjmt@. ..>

      > Subject: [John Muir Trail] Last minute questions before my trip to JMT

      > To: johnmuirtrail@ yahoogroups. com

      > Date: Tuesday, June 30, 2009, 1:12 AM

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      > Hi all,

      >

      > Since I've never camped in bear country, I had two questions about logistics at night:

      >

      > * From what I've heard, I should be leaving the bear canister ~50 yards from the tent (still within earshot of the tent). Should I be hiding the canister under brush, atop a pile of rocks, or leaving it in the open?

      > * I also overheard I should leave the backpacks outside the tent and leave them open. Is this true? If so, should it be right outside the ten? Also, would it be okay if I wrapped it in my poncho to prevent morning dew from making its way inside the pack?I've heard a couple of ways of doing these things but is there a general consensus to follow? Thanks a lot!

      >

      > Kevin

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    • John Ladd
      I second the suggestion about raingear (not a poncho). It is surprisingly warm when combined with just about anything underneath. Also surprisingly warm warn
      Message 2 of 16 , Jul 1, 2009
        I second the suggestion about raingear (not a poncho). It is surprisingly
        warm when combined with just about anything underneath. Also surprisingly
        warm warn inside a sleeping bag (though a little sweaty -- you wouldn';t
        want to wear it unless you were cold).

        If you get too cold, just get into your sleeping bag early and when you get
        up in the morning, jump around a lot. If your are cold inside your bag,
        exaggerate your natural shivering response. It really will help you warm up
        fast.

        For sure, bring things to keep your hands warm and dry. It is really hard
        to break camp when your fingers are too cold to stuff your bag, fasten your
        straps, tie your laces etc. Gloves also serve as hot pads for cooking and
        can protect your hands if you get a cut and the band-aids keep coming off.

        John Curran Ladd
        1616 Castro Street
        San Francisco, CA 94114-3707
        415-648-9279 (voice and fax)


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