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Yet more mistakes

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  • John Ladd
    Every trip seems to include some mistakes, and my recently-completed 9-day in the Selden Pass area was no exception. I thought I d write them up in hopes that
    Message 1 of 15 , Jun 24, 2009
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      Every trip seems to include some mistakes, and my recently-completed 9-day in the Selden Pass area was no exception. I thought I'd write them up in hopes that it would make me remember better not to repeat them, and for whatever help it gives others in the group.

      1) I lost my first aid kit and pee bottle due to poor attachment to my backpack. As I was leaving for the morning I realized (late) that it would not fit it inside the pack. I had already packed all the little velcro straps and extra mini-beeners and I didn't want to fish them out. So I just hung it on a strap, telling myself that the plastic would make noise if it dropped. Unfortunately it dropped as I was crossing a side-slope that led on a 45 degree angle down to Heart Lake. I heard it drop, all right, but I then watched it slide down the icy slope and then out onto the thin ice of heart Lake. A goner.

      Lesson: always attach anything to the pack with something that can't come loose. No exceptions.

      2) Which brings me to the bigger mistake. As I was watching the bottle skid onto the ice, I realized that it could have been me sliding down the side-slope. I was following just 2 prior sets of not-too-deep tracks across a very icy slope, walking on the contour, but with a terrible slide down into the lake if I had missed my footing on icy hardpack. I was not carrying an ice ax. I had convinced myself that trekking poles with snow baskets, plus the tracks I was following made it OK, but is retrospect it was a stupid risk. If I had waited an hour or two, the icy snow would have softened up and I could have crossed safely. By the time I realizzed my mistake I was half way across and it would have been more dangerous to turn around than to continue.

      Lesson: Don't do something dangerous just because you want to cover a given distance on a given day.

      3) I planned an over-ambitious day 1 and paid the price the entire trip. The mileage did not look bad, but I failed to consider: 1) I was not starting until early afternoon, 2) I had no altitude adaptation (I went form San Francisco to 9000 feet in the one day, the fact that I was carrying more weight than usual, and 3) the elevation gain was substantial. And by the time I realized I was overtaxed, I was on a long steep section of the JMT that had no camping spots for several miles (not even dry ones and not even for my small bivy). As a result, I had over-use problems with a knee, which turned nasty a few days later when I twisted it coming down in the snow from Selden Pass. I think if I had planned my first day more sensibly, I would have avoided the problem.

      Lesson: look at more than distance - consider whether other factors will make my "usual" mileage unrealistic.

      4) Total embarassment. One night I failed to locate my flashlight before dark and was reduced to borrowing a flashlight from a neighboring hiker in order to find my flashlight (no moon due to late moonrise and clouds).

      Lesson: always keep the flashlight in the same place or make sure you locate it before it gets dark.

      John Ladd
    • Jon Shannon
      Thanks John. Helpful tips/reminders. It reminded me that I need to get fresh batteries for my headlamp! Jon
      Message 2 of 15 , Jun 25, 2009
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        Thanks John. Helpful tips/reminders. It reminded me that I need to get fresh batteries for my headlamp!

        Jon

        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "John Ladd" <johnladd@...> wrote:
        > I thought I'd write them up in hopes that it would make me remember better not to repeat them, and for whatever help it gives others in the group.
      • herbstroh@charter.net
        John-- Good topic for discussion. Your #1 reminded me of my goof this Spring hiking on the Grand Enchantment Trail. We wound up off trail--something that
        Message 3 of 15 , Jun 25, 2009
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          John--

          Good topic for discussion.

          Your #1 reminded me of my goof this Spring hiking on the Grand Enchantment
          Trail. We wound up off trail--something that happens often along the
          GET--and I wanted to stow one of my hiking poles for a short
          bushwacking/scrambling section. I COULD have attached it to the ice axe
          loops of my pack, but hey, it will only be a short distance, so why not
          just put the pole in my long pocket? I even thought, if it falls out I will
          surely hear it.

          We scrambled along steep slope working our way through heavy brush, and
          successfull regained the trail. But of course, when I went for the pole it
          was long gone. I turned back, but immediately realized that even if I
          wanted to repeat the struggle, there is no way I could exactly retrace our
          steps.

          Good advice indeed--always secure items to the pack, no execeptions.

          Original Message:
          -----------------
          From: John Ladd johnladd@...
          Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2009 06:29:06 -0000
          To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [John Muir Trail] Yet more mistakes


          Every trip seems to include some mistakes, and my recently-completed 9-day
          in the Selden Pass area was no exception. I thought I'd write them up in
          hopes that it would make me remember better not to repeat them, and for
          whatever help it gives others in the group.

          1) I lost my first aid kit and pee bottle due to poor attachment to my
          backpack. As I was leaving for the morning I realized (late) that it would
          not fit it inside the pack. I had already packed all the little velcro
          straps and extra mini-beeners and I didn't want to fish them out. So I
          just hung it on a strap, telling myself that the plastic would make noise
          if it dropped. Unfortunately it dropped as I was crossing a side-slope
          that led on a 45 degree angle down to Heart Lake. I heard it drop, all
          right, but I then watched it slide down the icy slope and then out onto the
          thin ice of heart Lake. A goner.

          Lesson: always attach anything to the pack with something that can't come
          loose. No exceptions.

          2) Which brings me to the bigger mistake. As I was watching the bottle
          skid onto the ice, I realized that it could have been me sliding down the
          side-slope. I was following just 2 prior sets of not-too-deep tracks
          across a very icy slope, walking on the contour, but with a terrible slide
          down into the lake if I had missed my footing on icy hardpack. I was not
          carrying an ice ax. I had convinced myself that trekking poles with snow
          baskets, plus the tracks I was following made it OK, but is retrospect it
          was a stupid risk. If I had waited an hour or two, the icy snow would have
          softened up and I could have crossed safely. By the time I realizzed my
          mistake I was half way across and it would have been more dangerous to turn
          around than to continue.

          Lesson: Don't do something dangerous just because you want to cover a given
          distance on a given day.

          3) I planned an over-ambitious day 1 and paid the price the entire trip.
          The mileage did not look bad, but I failed to consider: 1) I was not
          starting until early afternoon, 2) I had no altitude adaptation (I went
          form San Francisco to 9000 feet in the one day, the fact that I was
          carrying more weight than usual, and 3) the elevation gain was substantial.
          And by the time I realized I was overtaxed, I was on a long steep section
          of the JMT that had no camping spots for several miles (not even dry ones
          and not even for my small bivy). As a result, I had over-use problems with
          a knee, which turned nasty a few days later when I twisted it coming down
          in the snow from Selden Pass. I think if I had planned my first day more
          sensibly, I would have avoided the problem.

          Lesson: look at more than distance - consider whether other factors will
          make my "usual" mileage unrealistic.

          4) Total embarassment. One night I failed to locate my flashlight before
          dark and was reduced to borrowing a flashlight from a neighboring hiker in
          order to find my flashlight (no moon due to late moonrise and clouds).

          Lesson: always keep the flashlight in the same place or make sure you
          locate it before it gets dark.

          John Ladd



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        • John Ladd
          You remind me of another mistake - my worst trekking pole mistake. I had just bought a new pair of trekking poles and I didn t really know how to adjust the
          Message 4 of 15 , Jun 25, 2009
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            You remind me of another mistake - my worst trekking pole mistake. I had
            just bought a new pair of trekking poles and I didn't really know how to
            adjust the tightness of the adjustment lever. I momentarily lost my balance
            in a way that a well-tightened pole would have caught me on. But,
            improperly tightened, the sudden weight shift collapsed the pole, and my
            loss of balance resulted in a nasty, preventable knee twist. As it turned
            out that it was really easy to adjust the poles more tightly by turning a
            small screw, if I had only:

            1) known how and
            2) tested the tightness before setting out by putting a sudden sharp push on
            the pole.

            John Curran Ladd
            1616 Castro Street
            San Francisco, CA 94114-3707
            415-648-9279 (voice and fax)


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Bill Plesha
            Speaking of mistakes involving trekking poles I must admit to a couple of good ones - I ve lost two pair of Leki trekking poles after returning from hikes. One
            Message 5 of 15 , Jun 25, 2009
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              Speaking of mistakes involving trekking poles I must admit to a couple of good ones - I've lost two pair of Leki trekking poles after returning from hikes.

              One was after a trip outside of Greenville, SC in a area called Jones Gap. After finishing the hike I placed both poles on top of my Jeep Cherokee. I then proceeded to stow my pack, change out of my boots, etc. I managed to forget completely about the sticks and drove off. Obviously they fell off the top of the jeep somewhere and I never gave it a thought until I got back home.

              The second time was after completing Wheeler Peak up out of Taos, NM. This time I laid them against the passenger side of my car. By the time I was ready to leave I again forgot about them and drove off. By the time I realized what had happened it was too late to go back for them.

              My wife informed me after the second incident that she was buying me one more pair for my birthday and that was it:)

              The lesson I learned is to NEVER lay my sticks somewhere out of my sight after a hike!!

              Bill Plesha
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: John Ladd
              To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2009 10:29 AM
              Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Yet more mistakes





              You remind me of another mistake - my worst trekking pole mistake. I had
              just bought a new pair of trekking poles and I didn't really know how to
              adjust the tightness of the adjustment lever. I momentarily lost my balance
              in a way that a well-tightened pole would have caught me on. But,
              improperly tightened, the sudden weight shift collapsed the pole, and my
              loss of balance resulted in a nasty, preventable knee twist. As it turned
              out that it was really easy to adjust the poles more tightly by turning a
              small screw, if I had only:

              1) known how and
              2) tested the tightness before setting out by putting a sudden sharp push on
              the pole.

              John Curran Ladd
              1616 Castro Street
              San Francisco, CA 94114-3707
              415-648-9279 (voice and fax)

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • John Ladd
              My pattern on losing stuff always seems the same. If I ve had a rest stop by myself, or if I am breaking camp by myself, I always remember to make a
              Message 6 of 15 , Jun 25, 2009
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                My pattern on losing stuff always seems the same. If I've had a rest stop
                by myself, or if I am breaking camp by myself, I always remember to make a
                last-minute scan of the area (and frequently find something I was about to
                leave behind).

                But if I've stopped to have lunch with someone, or am talking to someone as
                I leave camp, I seem to forget about the last-minute check and then discover
                8 miles later that I am missing something.


                John


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Specracer
                I just did this on the skyline to sea hike last month. Stopped at waterman gap for water and walked away without my poles. Lost a nice knife on the raw lakes
                Message 7 of 15 , Jun 25, 2009
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                  I just did this on the skyline to sea hike last month.
                  Stopped at waterman gap for water and walked away without my poles. Lost a nice knife on the raw lakes loop on a short lunch break.

                  I attribute it to my failing memory. This is why my map,compass, and gps are tied to my pack!

                  Derek:-)

                  Sent from my iPod

                  On Jun 25, 2009, at 10:40 AM, "Bill Plesha" <backpackerman@...> wrote:



                  Speaking of mistakes involving trekking poles I must admit to a couple of good ones - I've lost two pair of Leki trekking poles after returning from hikes.

                  One was after a trip outside of Greenville, SC in a area called Jones Gap. After finishing the hike I placed both poles on top of my Jeep Cherokee. I then proceeded to stow my pack, change out of my boots, etc. I managed to forget completely about the sticks and drove off. Obviously they fell off the top of the jeep somewhere and I never gave it a thought until I got back home.

                  The second time was after completing Wheeler Peak up out of Taos, NM. This time I laid them against the passenger side of my car. By the time I was ready to leave I again forgot about them and drove off. By the time I realized what had happened it was too late to go back for them.

                  My wife informed me after the second incident that she was buying me one more pair for my birthday and that was it:)

                  The lesson I learned is to NEVER lay my sticks somewhere out of my sight after a hike!!

                  Bill Plesha
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: John Ladd
                  To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2009 10:29 AM
                  Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Yet more mistakes

                  You remind me of another mistake - my worst trekking pole mistake. I had
                  just bought a new pair of trekking poles and I didn't really know how to
                  adjust the tightness of the adjustment lever. I momentarily lost my balance
                  in a way that a well-tightened pole would have caught me on. But,
                  improperly tightened, the sudden weight shift collapsed the pole, and my
                  loss of balance resulted in a nasty, preventable knee twist. As it turned
                  out that it was really easy to adjust the poles more tightly by turning a
                  small screw, if I had only:

                  1) known how and
                  2) tested the tightness before setting out by putting a sudden sharp push on
                  the pole.

                  John Curran Ladd
                  1616 Castro Street
                  San Francisco, CA 94114-3707
                  415-648-9279 (voice and fax)

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Barbara Karagosian
                  Totally off JMT topic - but I did the same thing with my daughter s stroller as you did with your poles.. _____ From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                  Message 8 of 15 , Jun 25, 2009
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                    Totally off JMT topic - but I did the same thing with my daughter's stroller
                    as you did with your poles..



                    _____

                    From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com]
                    On Behalf Of Bill Plesha
                    Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2009 10:40 AM
                    To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Yet more mistakes








                    Speaking of mistakes involving trekking poles I must admit to a couple of
                    good ones - I've lost two pair of Leki trekking poles after returning from
                    hikes.

                    One was after a trip outside of Greenville, SC in a area called Jones Gap.
                    After finishing the hike I placed both poles on top of my Jeep Cherokee. I
                    then proceeded to stow my pack, change out of my boots, etc. I managed to
                    forget completely about the sticks and drove off. Obviously they fell off
                    the top of the jeep somewhere and I never gave it a thought until I got back
                    home.

                    The second time was after completing Wheeler Peak up out of Taos, NM. This
                    time I laid them against the passenger side of my car. By the time I was
                    ready to leave I again forgot about them and drove off. By the time I
                    realized what had happened it was too late to go back for them.

                    My wife informed me after the second incident that she was buying me one
                    more pair for my birthday and that was it:)

                    The lesson I learned is to NEVER lay my sticks somewhere out of my sight
                    after a hike!!

                    Bill Plesha
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: John Ladd
                    To: johnmuirtrail@ <mailto:johnmuirtrail%40yahoogroups.com> yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2009 10:29 AM
                    Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Yet more mistakes

                    You remind me of another mistake - my worst trekking pole mistake. I had
                    just bought a new pair of trekking poles and I didn't really know how to
                    adjust the tightness of the adjustment lever. I momentarily lost my balance
                    in a way that a well-tightened pole would have caught me on. But,
                    improperly tightened, the sudden weight shift collapsed the pole, and my
                    loss of balance resulted in a nasty, preventable knee twist. As it turned
                    out that it was really easy to adjust the poles more tightly by turning a
                    small screw, if I had only:

                    1) known how and
                    2) tested the tightness before setting out by putting a sudden sharp push on
                    the pole.

                    John Curran Ladd
                    1616 Castro Street
                    San Francisco, CA 94114-3707
                    415-648-9279 (voice and fax)

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Barbara Karagosian
                    And I ve got on the Yosemite shuttle and left my entire backpack at the shuttle stop - LOL _____ From: Barbara Karagosian [mailto:barbara@mkpe.com] Sent:
                    Message 9 of 15 , Jun 25, 2009
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                      And I've got on the Yosemite shuttle and left my entire backpack at the
                      shuttle stop - LOL



                      _____

                      From: Barbara Karagosian [mailto:barbara@...]
                      Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2009 1:12 PM
                      To: 'johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com'
                      Subject: RE: [John Muir Trail] Yet more mistakes



                      Totally off JMT topic - but I did the same thing with my daughter's stroller
                      as you did with your poles..



                      _____

                      From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com]
                      On Behalf Of Bill Plesha
                      Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2009 10:40 AM
                      To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Yet more mistakes







                      Speaking of mistakes involving trekking poles I must admit to a couple of
                      good ones - I've lost two pair of Leki trekking poles after returning from
                      hikes.

                      One was after a trip outside of Greenville, SC in a area called Jones Gap.
                      After finishing the hike I placed both poles on top of my Jeep Cherokee. I
                      then proceeded to stow my pack, change out of my boots, etc. I managed to
                      forget completely about the sticks and drove off. Obviously they fell off
                      the top of the jeep somewhere and I never gave it a thought until I got back
                      home.

                      The second time was after completing Wheeler Peak up out of Taos, NM. This
                      time I laid them against the passenger side of my car. By the time I was
                      ready to leave I again forgot about them and drove off. By the time I
                      realized what had happened it was too late to go back for them.

                      My wife informed me after the second incident that she was buying me one
                      more pair for my birthday and that was it:)

                      The lesson I learned is to NEVER lay my sticks somewhere out of my sight
                      after a hike!!

                      Bill Plesha
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: John Ladd
                      To: johnmuirtrail@ <mailto:johnmuirtrail%40yahoogroups.com> yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2009 10:29 AM
                      Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Yet more mistakes

                      You remind me of another mistake - my worst trekking pole mistake. I had
                      just bought a new pair of trekking poles and I didn't really know how to
                      adjust the tightness of the adjustment lever. I momentarily lost my balance
                      in a way that a well-tightened pole would have caught me on. But,
                      improperly tightened, the sudden weight shift collapsed the pole, and my
                      loss of balance resulted in a nasty, preventable knee twist. As it turned
                      out that it was really easy to adjust the poles more tightly by turning a
                      small screw, if I had only:

                      1) known how and
                      2) tested the tightness before setting out by putting a sudden sharp push on
                      the pole.

                      John Curran Ladd
                      1616 Castro Street
                      San Francisco, CA 94114-3707
                      415-648-9279 (voice and fax)

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Bill Plesha
                      Barbara -I think you win:) ... From: Barbara Karagosian To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2009 1:13 PM Subject: RE: [John Muir Trail]
                      Message 10 of 15 , Jun 25, 2009
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                        Barbara -I think you win:)


                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: Barbara Karagosian
                        To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2009 1:13 PM
                        Subject: RE: [John Muir Trail] Yet more mistakes





                        And I've got on the Yosemite shuttle and left my entire backpack at the
                        shuttle stop - LOL

                        _____

                        From: Barbara Karagosian [mailto:barbara@...]
                        Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2009 1:12 PM
                        To: 'johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com'
                        Subject: RE: [John Muir Trail] Yet more mistakes

                        Totally off JMT topic - but I did the same thing with my daughter's stroller
                        as you did with your poles..

                        _____

                        From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com]
                        On Behalf Of Bill Plesha
                        Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2009 10:40 AM
                        To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Yet more mistakes

                        Speaking of mistakes involving trekking poles I must admit to a couple of
                        good ones - I've lost two pair of Leki trekking poles after returning from
                        hikes.

                        One was after a trip outside of Greenville, SC in a area called Jones Gap.
                        After finishing the hike I placed both poles on top of my Jeep Cherokee. I
                        then proceeded to stow my pack, change out of my boots, etc. I managed to
                        forget completely about the sticks and drove off. Obviously they fell off
                        the top of the jeep somewhere and I never gave it a thought until I got back
                        home.

                        The second time was after completing Wheeler Peak up out of Taos, NM. This
                        time I laid them against the passenger side of my car. By the time I was
                        ready to leave I again forgot about them and drove off. By the time I
                        realized what had happened it was too late to go back for them.

                        My wife informed me after the second incident that she was buying me one
                        more pair for my birthday and that was it:)

                        The lesson I learned is to NEVER lay my sticks somewhere out of my sight
                        after a hike!!

                        Bill Plesha
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: John Ladd
                        To: johnmuirtrail@ <mailto:johnmuirtrail%40yahoogroups.com> yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2009 10:29 AM
                        Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Yet more mistakes

                        You remind me of another mistake - my worst trekking pole mistake. I had
                        just bought a new pair of trekking poles and I didn't really know how to
                        adjust the tightness of the adjustment lever. I momentarily lost my balance
                        in a way that a well-tightened pole would have caught me on. But,
                        improperly tightened, the sudden weight shift collapsed the pole, and my
                        loss of balance resulted in a nasty, preventable knee twist. As it turned
                        out that it was really easy to adjust the poles more tightly by turning a
                        small screw, if I had only:

                        1) known how and
                        2) tested the tightness before setting out by putting a sudden sharp push on
                        the pole.

                        John Curran Ladd
                        1616 Castro Street
                        San Francisco, CA 94114-3707
                        415-648-9279 (voice and fax)

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Mark Liechty
                        ... ###### Please tell us your daughter was not IN the stroller.
                        Message 11 of 15 , Jun 25, 2009
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                          Barbara Karagosian wrote:
                          > Totally off JMT topic - but I did the same thing with my daughter's stroller
                          > as you did with your poles..
                          >
                          ######

                          Please tell us your daughter was not IN the stroller.
                        • Barbara Karagosian
                          Right - I kept the daughter! It was in a small village in England - a lady found the stroller and took it to the local police station. My mom had the bright
                          Message 12 of 15 , Jun 25, 2009
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Right - I kept the daughter! It was in a small village in England - a lady
                            found the stroller and took it to the local police station. My mom had the
                            bright idea to call the police station to se if anyone had turned it in -
                            and they had! Of course when she suggested calling them, I laughed up a
                            storm - like anyone would turn it in! But that's English villages for you.



                            _____

                            From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com]
                            On Behalf Of Mark Liechty
                            Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2009 2:24 PM
                            To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Yet more mistakes








                            Barbara Karagosian wrote:
                            > Totally off JMT topic - but I did the same thing with my daughter's
                            stroller
                            > as you did with your poles..
                            >
                            ######

                            Please tell us your daughter was not IN the stroller.





                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • John Ladd
                            Here s a solution to one of the problems I mentioned in my original posting. It is a miniature LED light that is part of a cord lock. The idea is that you
                            Message 13 of 15 , Jun 27, 2009
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Here's a solution to one of the problems I mentioned in my original
                              posting. It is a miniature LED light that is part of a cord lock. The idea
                              is that you find a piece of big, obvious, easy-to-find-in-the-dark gear that
                              needs a cord lock anyway and you replace it with this little light. If you
                              misplace your "real" flashlight, you can use this to find it, since It will
                              always be attached to the piece of gear that has the cord lock. Or use it
                              as a spare if your batteries run out. Or, if you like to go lightweight,
                              make it your only light.

                              [image: 49080f2e-ba21-4389-aa74-5c727a534ee4.jpg]
                              Link at REI <http://www.rei.com/product/780350>. Google-products don't show
                              any cheaper sources onine.

                              Costs $10 (batteries included). Weighs 0.3 oz. with the battery.
                              Replacement batteries (2) are CR1220 lithium (camera batteries - about $1.50
                              each). Claims useful life of 20 hours on low, 12 on high, 20 hours in
                              strobe moce.

                              Three user comments at REI

                              I have found a couple standard places to put two of these cord-lock lights.
                              You wouldn't want to climb Mt Rainier by them, but they make a great
                              emergency back up light if I forget/misplace my main headlamp. So, one of
                              them goes on a short string attached to my pack or on my jacket.
                              The second one on the tent stuff sack is the one I use to FIND my main
                              headlamp. Fumbling in the dark looking for a light can take time. A small
                              light IN A KNOWN PLACE allows me to then find the misplaced bigger light.
                              Thanks. Works good.

                              This works great! I first used it when I went camping on my hoodie and I
                              haven't taken it off. It is great for camping but also for anytime use in
                              dark areas, like searching through my car at night!

                              I have purchased several of these cord lock lights and love them. I keep
                              finding new uses for them other than outdoor adventuring - as a safety light
                              on my dog's collar to my key ring. My son even wore his as a strobe light
                              bolo tie to his school sock hop!

                              All three reviewers gave it 5 stars (out of 5).

                              John Curran Ladd
                              1616 Castro Street
                              San Francisco, CA 94114-3707
                              415-648-9279 (voice and fax)


                              On Wed, Jun 24, 2009 at 11:29 PM, John Ladd <johnladd@...> wrote:

                              >
                              >
                              > Every trip seems to include some mistakes, and my recently-completed 9-day
                              > in the Selden Pass area was no exception.
                              >
                              > ...
                              > 4) Total embarassment. One night I failed to locate my flashlight before
                              > dark and was reduced to borrowing a flashlight from a neighboring hiker in
                              > order to find my flashlight (no moon due to late moonrise and clouds).
                              >
                              > Lesson: always keep the flashlight in the same place or make sure you
                              > locate it before it gets dark.
                              >
                              > John Ladd
                              >
                              > _
                              >
                              >
                              > __,_._,
                              >


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                            • Don Amundson
                              Since getting back into hiking after many years I ve had the advantage of having to research/buy new equipment and evaluate current techniques. Also since I m
                              Message 14 of 15 , Jun 27, 2009
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Since getting back into hiking after many years I've had the advantage of having to research/buy new equipment and evaluate current techniques. Also since I'm getting old an senile I'm prone to forgetting where I place things. One recommendation I found, and have adapted, is to put a Photon Freedom light, classic swiss army knife and emergency whistle on a cord and either put it around my neck or tie onto a belt loop on my pants. If I somehow loose my whole pack at least I'll have a few of the "essential 10" with me. I also carry a second light with a red bulb which I find to really make sense to maintain night vision. These light have a number of strobe-signal functions, a dimmer mode, and a clip accessory to attach to your hat, tent etc. http://www.photonlight.com/Photon-Freedom-Micro-Keychain-LED-Flashlights-p/fm-led-keychain-flashlight.htm

                                To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                                From: johnladd@...
                                Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2009 05:55:12 -0700
                                Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Yet more mistakes


























                                Here's a solution to one of the problems I mentioned in my original

                                posting. It is a miniature LED light that is part of a cord lock. The idea

                                is that you find a piece of big, obvious, easy-to-find-in-the-dark gear that

                                needs a cord lock anyway and you replace it with this little light. If you

                                misplace your "real" flashlight, you can use this to find it, since It will

                                always be attached to the piece of gear that has the cord lock. Or use it

                                as a spare if your batteries run out. Or, if you like to go lightweight,

                                make it your only light.



                                [image: 49080f2e-ba21-4389-aa74-5c727a534ee4.jpg]

                                Link at REI <http://www.rei.com/product/780350>. Google-products don't show

                                any cheaper sources onine.



                                Costs $10 (batteries included). Weighs 0.3 oz. with the battery.

                                Replacement batteries (2) are CR1220 lithium (camera batteries - about $1.50

                                each). Claims useful life of 20 hours on low, 12 on high, 20 hours in

                                strobe moce.



                                Three user comments at REI



                                I have found a couple standard places to put two of these cord-lock lights.

                                You wouldn't want to climb Mt Rainier by them, but they make a great

                                emergency back up light if I forget/misplace my main headlamp. So, one of

                                them goes on a short string attached to my pack or on my jacket.

                                The second one on the tent stuff sack is the one I use to FIND my main

                                headlamp. Fumbling in the dark looking for a light can take time. A small

                                light IN A KNOWN PLACE allows me to then find the misplaced bigger light.

                                Thanks. Works good.



                                This works great! I first used it when I went camping on my hoodie and I

                                haven't taken it off. It is great for camping but also for anytime use in

                                dark areas, like searching through my car at night!



                                I have purchased several of these cord lock lights and love them. I keep

                                finding new uses for them other than outdoor adventuring - as a safety light

                                on my dog's collar to my key ring. My son even wore his as a strobe light

                                bolo tie to his school sock hop!



                                All three reviewers gave it 5 stars (out of 5).



                                John Curran Ladd

                                1616 Castro Street

                                San Francisco, CA 94114-3707

                                415-648-9279 (voice and fax)



                                On Wed, Jun 24, 2009 at 11:29 PM, John Ladd <johnladd@...> wrote:



                                >

                                >

                                > Every trip seems to include some mistakes, and my recently-completed 9-day

                                > in the Selden Pass area was no exception.

                                >

                                > ...

                                > 4) Total embarassment. One night I failed to locate my flashlight before

                                > dark and was reduced to borrowing a flashlight from a neighboring hiker in

                                > order to find my flashlight (no moon due to late moonrise and clouds).

                                >

                                > Lesson: always keep the flashlight in the same place or make sure you

                                > locate it before it gets dark.

                                >

                                > John Ladd

                                >

                                > _

                                >

                                >

                                > __,_._,

                                >



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                              • Stuart Dodson
                                I keep my key ring Led light on a piece of elastic around my wrist at night so I can sort anything out and find my headlight if needed. ... From: John Ladd
                                Message 15 of 15 , Jul 3 3:49 AM
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  I keep my key ring Led light on a piece of elastic around my wrist at night so I can sort anything out and find my headlight if needed.

                                  --- On Thu, 6/25/09, John Ladd <johnladd@...> wrote:

                                  From: John Ladd <johnladd@...>
                                  Subject: [John Muir Trail] Yet more mistakes
                                  To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                                  Date: Thursday, June 25, 2009, 6:29 AM

















                                  Every trip seems to include some mistakes, and my recently-completed 9-day in the Selden Pass area was no exception. I thought I'd write them up in hopes that it would make me remember better not to repeat them, and for whatever help it gives others in the group.



                                  1) I lost my first aid kit and pee bottle due to poor attachment to my backpack. As I was leaving for the morning I realized (late) that it would not fit it inside the pack. I had already packed all the little velcro straps and extra mini-beeners and I didn't want to fish them out. So I just hung it on a strap, telling myself that the plastic would make noise if it dropped. Unfortunately it dropped as I was crossing a side-slope that led on a 45 degree angle down to Heart Lake. I heard it drop, all right, but I then watched it slide down the icy slope and then out onto the thin ice of heart Lake. A goner.



                                  Lesson: always attach anything to the pack with something that can't come loose. No exceptions.



                                  2) Which brings me to the bigger mistake. As I was watching the bottle skid onto the ice, I realized that it could have been me sliding down the side-slope. I was following just 2 prior sets of not-too-deep tracks across a very icy slope, walking on the contour, but with a terrible slide down into the lake if I had missed my footing on icy hardpack. I was not carrying an ice ax. I had convinced myself that trekking poles with snow baskets, plus the tracks I was following made it OK, but is retrospect it was a stupid risk. If I had waited an hour or two, the icy snow would have softened up and I could have crossed safely. By the time I realizzed my mistake I was half way across and it would have been more dangerous to turn around than to continue.



                                  Lesson: Don't do something dangerous just because you want to cover a given distance on a given day.



                                  3) I planned an over-ambitious day 1 and paid the price the entire trip. The mileage did not look bad, but I failed to consider: 1) I was not starting until early afternoon, 2) I had no altitude adaptation (I went form San Francisco to 9000 feet in the one day, the fact that I was carrying more weight than usual, and 3) the elevation gain was substantial. And by the time I realized I was overtaxed, I was on a long steep section of the JMT that had no camping spots for several miles (not even dry ones and not even for my small bivy). As a result, I had over-use problems with a knee, which turned nasty a few days later when I twisted it coming down in the snow from Selden Pass. I think if I had planned my first day more sensibly, I would have avoided the problem.



                                  Lesson: look at more than distance - consider whether other factors will make my "usual" mileage unrealistic.



                                  4) Total embarassment. One night I failed to locate my flashlight before dark and was reduced to borrowing a flashlight from a neighboring hiker in order to find my flashlight (no moon due to late moonrise and clouds).



                                  Lesson: always keep the flashlight in the same place or make sure you locate it before it gets dark.



                                  John Ladd































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