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For monsoonal JMT years, do we need squall raingear used by deep sea fishermen?

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  • Roleigh Martin
    I just finished 27 days on the JMT, July 15-Aug 10, and in 15 years of hiking in this time frame in the High Sierras, it was the wettest I ve hiked in yet.
    Message 1 of 68 , Aug 11, 2014
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      I just finished 27 days on the JMT, July 15-Aug 10, and in 15 years of hiking in this time frame in the High Sierras, it was the wettest I've hiked in yet.  One day it rained non-stop 12 hours, with sleet and rain encountered as we went over Pinchot Pass, and winds up to about 40-50 miles an hour (estimated).  Everything got wet and soaked.  My Rab eVent rain jacket was completely soaked.

      I'm wondering if one needs for this type of rainwear used by fishermen in deep sea squall conditions.  Where one wants to not have the coat be breathable, where one wants to retain body heat.

      Two of us had to setup tent, jump in our sleeping bags on our sleeping pads with down jackets and shiver for 2 hours to avoid hypothermia.

      I'm wondering if one needs two types of rain coats for difficult month-long JMT hikes (I'm 64, done 7 JMT hikes, and want to continue doing the JMT hikes each summer, as I find it the best blend of aerobic, anaerobic, scenery, meeting fascinating people, and aside from once-a-decade atypical monsoonal weather conditions, normally very benign, predictable weather conditions between mid-July to mid-Aug hiking.

      I've looked at jacket tonight from Arcteryx (Theta AR) and Grundens (have no idea which of their products to consider).  I'd like pit zips with waterproof zippers.  Any other jackets one can recommend based upon experience?

      I want a jacket that can take day after day of repeated rain.  We had about 2 days of bad rain a week for 3 weeks straight.

      Unbelievable for High Sierra weather conditions.

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    • Arla Hile
      Roleigh, Thanks for that link, the article is thorough yet concise. Even though it s not as cold and wet as the conditions discussed in the article, the basic
      Message 68 of 68 , Oct 10, 2014
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        Roleigh,
        Thanks for that link, the article is thorough yet concise. Even though it's not as cold and wet as the conditions discussed in the article, the basic idea of what he's saying should pretty much be standard practice in the Sierra in summer. It's hard to pack all that stuff when you're home and it's 100F outside. Every year I go through the "do I really need this" dance, and every year I'm glad to have packed the proper gear.

        My hat's off to people who can go day after day after day in the wet, I've had my share of camping in constant rain and drizzle in the British Isles (although it was a bicycle trip), don't think I'll do that again unless it's on the John Muir Way and the nights are spent in B and Bs! :)

        Cheers,
        Arla


        On Wednesday, October 8, 2014 11:28 PM, "Roleigh Martin roleigh@... [johnmuirtrail]" <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


         
        A great article on hiking in prolonged, cold rain is here -- super worth the read if you're ever faced with a JMT like we had this year.


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