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Packing a Bear Cannister

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  • stuart.plotnick
    I am looking for advise as to how to best repackage Mountain House type meals in order to maximize space. What type, size,thickness of ziplock or whatever
    Message 1 of 12 , Aug 3, 2014
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      I am looking for advise as to how to best repackage Mountain House type meals in order to maximize space. What type, size,thickness of ziplock or whatever works best for a BV500. Any tips on this whole process would be welcomed. Thanks, Stuart 

    • Edwardo Rodriguez
      I use a quart size zip lock bag to put my mountain house dinners. But this year I found out if I just let the air out once I get my resupply box my meals fit
      Message 2 of 12 , Aug 3, 2014
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        I use a quart size zip lock bag to put my mountain house dinners. But this year I found out if I just let the air out once I get my resupply box my meals fit nicely into my can. But then again I was only carry 6 days of food at a time.


        On Sunday, August 3, 2014 9:58 AM, "stuart.medfly@... [johnmuirtrail]" <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


         
        I am looking for advise as to how to best repackage Mountain House type meals in order to maximize space. What type, size,thickness of ziplock or whatever works best for a BV500. Any tips on this whole process would be welcomed. Thanks, Stuart 


      • longritchie
        I often have the opposite problem. On shorter trips (or if resupplying frequently) my canister isn t full and the contents jostle around and make annoying
        Message 3 of 12 , Aug 3, 2014
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          I often have the opposite problem. On shorter trips (or if resupplying frequently) my canister isn't full and the contents jostle around and make annoying noises. If I pack all my clothes and other items in there it makes it hard to get at those items during the day. It also leaves less soft material to pack around the outside of the canister. This makes it more likely that (a) I'll feel the barrel like shape of the canister against my back and (b) the sharp edges of the canister (I have a Bearikade Weekender) could damage the pack material if I set the pack down against a hard object.

          So what do you do when the canister has a lot of extra room? Stuff bubble wrap in it? Buy a smaller canister? Take an Ursack?
        • Turk6177
          I use a different brand of food, but I use quart sized ziplock freezer bags (must be freezer bags due to the thickness). I roll them up like hot dogs and put
          Message 4 of 12 , Aug 3, 2014
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            I use a different brand of food, but I use quart sized ziplock freezer bags (must be freezer bags due to the thickness). I roll them up like hot dogs and put them into the can like you would put pencils in a shirt pocket (upright). I have to lean my bear can over to stack them in like that. When it comes time to prepare them,  I pour boiling water into the ziplock bag and put the bag in an insulated bag (I am sure a sweatshirt or winter hat would suffice) and after 10-15 minutes it is reconstituted and ready to eat. I put 9 days if food in my bear can this way. 

            Sent from my Fantastic iPhone 5!

            On Aug 3, 2014, at 9:58, "stuart.medfly@... [johnmuirtrail]" <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

             

            I am looking for advise as to how to best repackage Mountain House type meals in order to maximize space. What type, size,thickness of ziplock or whatever works best for a BV500. Any tips on this whole process would be welcomed. Thanks, Stuart 

          • straw_marmot
            This seems like the JMT equivalent of the First World Problems meme. Take some party balloons and blow them up gradually? If you do it with helium, it will
            Message 5 of 12 , Aug 3, 2014
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              This seems like the JMT equivalent of the "First World Problems" meme.

              Take some party balloons and blow them up gradually?   If you do it with helium, it will make your pack lighter.

              Or, you can hike with me and carry some of my stuff.
            • Michael Tran
              I usually pack my meals into individual ziplock, when a meal is eaten, I inflate the ziplock and place it back in.
              Message 6 of 12 , Aug 3, 2014
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                I usually pack my meals into individual ziplock, when a meal is eaten, I inflate the ziplock and place it back in.  

                On Aug 3, 2014, at 12:15 PM, longritchie <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                 

                I often have the opposite problem. On shorter trips (or if resupplying frequently) my canister isn't full and the contents jostle around and make annoying noises. If I pack all my clothes and other items in there it makes it hard to get at those items during the day. It also leaves less soft material to pack around the outside of the canister. This makes it more likely that (a) I'll feel the barrel like shape of the canister against my back and (b) the sharp edges of the canister (I have a Bearikade Weekender) could damage the pack material if I set the pack down against a hard object.

                So what do you do when the canister has a lot of extra room? Stuff bubble wrap in it? Buy a smaller canister? Take an Ursack?

              • longritchie
                Isn t everything we discuss here a First World Problem? If I carried your stuff you d be bummed because I d be 10-20 miles behind you at the end of the day.
                Message 7 of 12 , Aug 3, 2014
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                  Isn't everything we discuss here a First World Problem?

                  If I carried your stuff you'd be bummed because I'd be 10-20 miles behind you at the end of the day. Party balloons might actually work and could have an entertainment value in camp each evening.
                • straw_marmot
                  Perhaps there are other inflatable items that could be multi-purposed for entertainment value in camp each evening?
                  Message 8 of 12 , Aug 3, 2014
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                    Perhaps there are other inflatable items that could be multi-purposed for entertainment value in camp each evening?
                     

                  • longritchie
                    Ha ha, I m sure there are. I thought about partially inflating my mattress inside the canister but it seemed a little risky since the Bearikade has some
                    Message 9 of 12 , Aug 3, 2014
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                      Ha ha, I'm sure there are.

                      I thought about partially inflating my mattress inside the canister but it seemed a little risky since the Bearikade has some unnecessarily sharp edges inside.
                    • straw_marmot
                      I think for the Ultralight hiker, Mylar balloons are the way to go. Certainly the lightest, and they can probably be repaired with duct tape. Yogi the Bear
                      Message 10 of 12 , Aug 3, 2014
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                        I think for the Ultralight hiker, Mylar balloons are the way to go.  Certainly the lightest, and they can probably be repaired with duct tape.

                        Yogi the Bear Jumbo Birthday Party Balloon Supershape Decoration

                         



                        But watch out for the California Balloon Law.
                        California Balloon Law - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

                         



                      • John Ladd
                        Longritchie - Interesting question My bearcan fits my pack at the point where the greatest weight should be concentrated (centered, vertical, close to the
                        Message 11 of 12 , Aug 3, 2014
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                          Longritchie - Interesting question

                          My bearcan fits my pack at the point where the greatest weight should be concentrated (centered, vertical, close to the spine and fairly high). Because I greatly prefer an external frame pack, I don't need to worry about padding it.

                          Food is usually the heaviest (more accurately, densest) so it goes in preferentially. As food gets used up, other heavy stuff goes into it. Shelter, NeoAir, repair items, JetBoil. any extra water, etc. Sometimes the groundsheet separates food from other stuff. I try to pack it quite tight so the weight doesn't wiggle around as I walk (the little weight shifts cost energy). The compression straps on the pack then keep the whole thing tight and stable even as total needed pack volume diminishes. (That's why I think it is unwise to cut off compression straps)

                           It's worth it if you hike the Sierra a lot to have the bearcan and pack chosen so that they work together well in weight distribution terms. (I understand many of you are adapting an existing pack to a bearcan for this trip - and I sympathize). Once the bearcan fits in the best place, you want it to work as a weight concentrator.

                          Since it fits vertically, it is pretty easy to access the contents with the Bearikade since I can just loosen the screws and lift the lid. If  it fit horizontally, access issues would be a limiting factor.

                          John Curran Ladd
                          1616 Castro Street
                          San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
                          415-648-9279


                          On Sun, Aug 3, 2014 at 12:15 PM, longritchie <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                           

                          I often have the opposite problem. On shorter trips (or if resupplying frequently) my canister isn't full and the contents jostle around and make annoying noises. If I pack all my clothes and other items in there it makes it hard to get at those items during the day. It also leaves less soft material to pack around the outside of the canister. This makes it more likely that (a) I'll feel the barrel like shape of the canister against my back and (b) the sharp edges of the canister (I have a Bearikade Weekender) could damage the pack material if I set the pack down against a hard object.

                          So what do you do when the canister has a lot of extra room? Stuff bubble wrap in it? Buy a smaller canister? Take an Ursack?


                        • Tim Habiger
                          Just finished a 2 week partial JMT (Red s meadow to Whitney Portal) last weekend.  As my bear can emptied I placed my repair kit, hygiene items and eventually
                          Message 12 of 12 , Aug 4, 2014
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                            Just finished a 2 week partial JMT (Red's meadow to Whitney Portal) last weekend.  As my bear can emptied I placed my repair kit, hygiene items and eventually my cook kit in it to take up space.  Seemed to work ok.  Access wasn't really an issue as I would remove all food needed for the upcoming day and place elsewhere in my pack.  Also would repack the can each morning before I took off.  Glad to hear of someone else still using an external frame pack.  I went back to an external this year after 5 years with an internal frame pack.  Just never got comfortable with it.  The external frame was about 1lb heavier but carried a 35-40lb load much better.  Customization for fit much better and pack organization (many pockets) was so much easier.  I'm never going back.
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