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Do you use your Teva's when...

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  • Roleigh Martin
    Bob, Do you use your Teva s on the JMT as your hiking sandal if it is pouring down rain and you don t want your boots to get soaked? I m curious how the Teva s
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 7, 2014
      Bob, Do you use your Teva's on the JMT as your hiking sandal if it is pouring down rain and you don't want your boots to get soaked?

      I'm curious how the Teva's play in various scenarios where you end up using them as your hiking shoe.

      I ended up getting these based on your recommendation (I know you use the plain Hurricane but already I've thanked myself for the toe protection).


      They weigh 10.42 oz a sandal (size 10, men).

      I'm still debating whether to bring these on the JMT, but their potential use in a rain situation might be the deciding factor.

      Thanks!

      Roleigh
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    • Robert Doyle
      Roleigh I use Teva sandals, but only for water crossings and base camp. I am going to use gaiters on this hike to help keep debris out along with water. Bob
      Message 2 of 9 , Jul 7, 2014
        Roleigh

        I use Teva sandals, but only for water crossings and base camp. I am going to use gaiters on this hike to help keep debris out along with water.
        Bob Doyle 


        On Monday, July 7, 2014 3:35 PM, "Roleigh Martin roleigh@... [johnmuirtrail]" <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


         
        Bob, Do you use your Teva's on the JMT as your hiking sandal if it is pouring down rain and you don't want your boots to get soaked?

        I'm curious how the Teva's play in various scenarios where you end up using them as your hiking shoe.

        I ended up getting these based on your recommendation (I know you use the plain Hurricane but already I've thanked myself for the toe protection).


        They weigh 10.42 oz a sandal (size 10, men).

        I'm still debating whether to bring these on the JMT, but their potential use in a rain situation might be the deciding factor.

        Thanks!

        Roleigh
        -------------------------------------------------
        Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research links)
        _



      • robert shattuck
        Do you use your Teva s on the JMT as your hiking sandal if it is pouring down rain and you don t want your boots to get soaked? Roleigh, I love talking teva
        Message 3 of 9 , Jul 7, 2014
          "Do you use your Teva's on the JMT as your hiking sandal if it is pouring down rain and you don't want your boots to get soaked?" 


          Roleigh, 

          I love talking teva . . . 

          I have used them in the rain, but mainly because they were just on my feet. Again, I like to switch them out all the time, give my feet/legs something new to do––it's just really refreshing. 

          Admittedly, I used to wear them a lot more, when I clunked around in a big pair of Fabiano leather boots––the sandals just changed everything once I put them on––I was suddenly energized and ready to go. 


          I don't feel the need now, so much, but still––when you've hit that mark in the day where the map says you've got three miles to go, but the feet and all the rest of you, are saying any patch of rocks will do, just stop––slip on the sandals, soak in a stream––suddenly those three miles will be behind you. 

          I'm no foot expert, but I have found that there's a difference FOR ME, when I switch out the footwear early and take my feet––ankles––legs through a fresh range of motion, rather than just slogging into camp, getting out of the boots and into the sandals and not really doing anything. 


          " I'm curious how the Teva's play in various scenarios where you end up using them as your hiking shoe. " 

          Again, I'm thinking, if I am going to bring a second pair of footwear, why not let it be something that I know I can trust to get me out of the mountains, if need be, as well as be my "go-to" for water crossings and just plain old comfort. 

          I've seen boots that have literally fallen apart, boots that have been burned ( left in the fire to dry! ) and people with injuries, not to mention my own swollen ankle and I was happy to have the sandals, as my foot didn't really agree with my shoe at that point. 

          Those Five-Finger things, please . . . I've seen enough of them on the trail and all of my encounters have been with some pretty sad, pained people. I bet they're great for camp and of course they've gotta be a good water crossing shoe, but for the unprepared, untrained foot, you're gonna be sorry and wish you had some Teva. 

          Crocs, again, had a few pairs, great for lounging around the camp . . . wouldn't want to cross any rough water with them and certainly wouldn't want to have to hike any Sierra granite in them. 

          and while I am at it, I will be headed out (SHR!!!) in a few weeks and just like your boots, you should put a little trail time into your sandals as they can wear on your toes and so on and cause you just as much discomfort as your boots . . . I wear the sandals a lot, but I now know where they work and don't especially when your feet are not bro

          A few years back, I got into the valley and immediately secured a permit to leave that very day, Happy Isles with a pass-thru on LYV . . . my feet were virgin, untanned and hadn't seen the sandals for many months, but eager to get on the trail, I decided to just wear them . . . getting into my camp spot that night, I had some nice spots where the sandals had rubbed me wrong with all that hot uphill. ugh. 

          . . . and as for your need for toe-protection, I've never found that to be an issue. AS USUAL, YOUR RESULTS EXPERIENCES MAY VARY. 


          BOB SHATTUCK

          http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480




        • jyeider@ymail.com
          Thanks Robert & Roleigh  My crocs just left the pack and my Teva s only weigh 4oz more. Jeff Yeider Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S™ III, an AT&T 4G LTE
          Message 4 of 9 , Jul 7, 2014
            Thanks Robert & Roleigh 
            My crocs just left the pack and my Teva's only weigh 4oz more.
            Jeff Yeider



            Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S™ III, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
          • Lynn Alexander
            I carry Tevas for camp and water crossing too. This weekend hiking in north east Yosemite it was so hot that when I changed into the Tevas for a river crossing
            Message 5 of 9 , Jul 7, 2014

              I carry Tevas for camp and water crossing too. This weekend hiking in north east Yosemite it was so hot that when I changed into the Tevas for a river crossing they felt so good I just hiked in them for the next 5 days (55 miles). They worked so well I started to wonder if I wanted to use them instead of boots for the JMT.

              On Jul 7, 2014 12:35 PM, "Roleigh Martin roleigh@... [johnmuirtrail]" <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
               

              Bob, Do you use your Teva's on the JMT as your hiking sandal if it is pouring down rain and you don't want your boots to get soaked?

              I'm curious how the Teva's play in various scenarios where you end up using them as your hiking shoe.

              I ended up getting these based on your recommendation (I know you use the plain Hurricane but already I've thanked myself for the toe protection).


              They weigh 10.42 oz a sandal (size 10, men).

              I'm still debating whether to bring these on the JMT, but their potential use in a rain situation might be the deciding factor.

              Thanks!

              Roleigh
              -------------------------------------------------
              Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research links)
              _

            • Arla Hile
              A couple years ago a group of us hiked the King Range in the extreme NW corner of California. On the second day we had a full day of hiking on cobbles on the
              Message 6 of 9 , Jul 7, 2014
              A couple years ago a group of us hiked the King Range in the extreme NW corner of California. On the second day we had a full day of hiking on cobbles on the beach, working hard to stay above the tideline. Ouch. We all changed into our beach shoes for the hike up to King Peak. That's me in the foreground with my old school (but trusty) external-frame pack. 



              On Monday, July 7, 2014 4:44 PM, "Lynn Alexander drlynnalexander@... [johnmuirtrail]" <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


               
              I carry Tevas for camp and water crossing too. This weekend hiking in north east Yosemite it was so hot that when I changed into the Tevas for a river crossing they felt so good I just hiked in them for the next 5 days (55 miles). They worked so well I started to wonder if I wanted to use them instead of boots for the JMT.
              On Jul 7, 2014 12:35 PM, "Roleigh Martin roleigh@... [johnmuirtrail]" <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
               
              Bob, Do you use your Teva's on the JMT as your hiking sandal if it is pouring down rain and you don't want your boots to get soaked?

              I'm curious how the Teva's play in various scenarios where you end up using them as your hiking shoe.

              I ended up getting these based on your recommendation (I know you use the plain Hurricane but already I've thanked myself for the toe protection).


              They weigh 10.42 oz a sandal (size 10, men).

              I'm still debating whether to bring these on the JMT, but their potential use in a rain situation might be the deciding factor.

              Thanks!

              Roleigh
              -------------------------------------------------
              Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research links)
              _



            • james_christopherson
              Bob, I am needing a new pair of sandals for around home as the old ones are being retired and I know you love Teva s. I was wondering if you could recommend a
              Message 7 of 9 , Aug 24, 2014

                Bob,

                I am needing a new pair of sandals for around home as the old ones are being retired and I know you love Teva's.


                I was wondering if you could recommend a couple of models I could try and see how they work at home and I could add them to my gear. 


                In the past I wore trail hikers and a pair of flip flops for in the tent or late night bathroom runs.


                Thank you in advance.


                Jamers

              • robert shattuck
                James, Go for the Teva Hurrcaines XLT ( what I use ) or the Terra Fi Lite . . . . they re inexpensive, minimal . . well made. Contrary to what others seem
                Message 8 of 9 , Aug 24, 2014

                  James, 

                   Go for the Teva Hurrcaines XLT ( what I use )  or the Terra Fi Lite . . . . they're inexpensive, minimal . .  well made.  Contrary to what others seem to think, I've never needed the ones with the toe cap ( might as well wear white socks then and be european ) 

                  I'd stay away from the ones that lean more towards being a "water" sandal . . . they're probably a little lighter, but my guess is there's not as much protection under foot. 

                  You could also check out Chaco's, but they're a little on the pricier side. 

                  So maybe you've read my thoughts on Teva's  . . . I've had the experience of needing to wear something besides my boots when I've done things like, sprain my ankle which swelled up and of course, in years past got some blisters and found that by switching out, I could avoid rubbing them and just keep on truckin' , plus, it's just nice to switch out now and then and give the feet a new way to move, breath and just get generally re-energized . . . 

                  I've also seen people's boots totally fail and fall apart . . . so I've always thought, if you're gonna carry a camp shoe, why not one that does more than just sit around the fire. 

                  Bob


                  http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480




                  To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                  From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 22:54:19 -0700
                  Subject: RE: [John Muir Trail] Do you use your Teva's when...

                   

                  Bob,

                  I am needing a new pair of sandals for around home as the old ones are being retired and I know you love Teva's.


                  I was wondering if you could recommend a couple of models I could try and see how they work at home and I could add them to my gear. 


                  In the past I wore trail hikers and a pair of flip flops for in the tent or late night bathroom runs.


                  Thank you in advance.


                  Jamers

                • John Schuster
                  My preference for camp shoes are the Merrell trail Glove. As the name implies, these shoe fit like a pair of gloves. When not being used as camp shoes, these
                  Message 9 of 9 , Aug 26, 2014
                    My preference for camp shoes are the Merrell trail Glove. As the name implies, these shoe fit like a pair of gloves. When not being used as camp shoes, these are my minimalist, zero-stop running shoes.  They have sturdy, grippy, Vibram soles that allow them to be used for bouldering around camp, They are so flexible, they can be rolled up and stuffed in a pack pocket
                    -- 
                    John Schuster
                    jasustar@...
                    Livermore, CA

                    On August 24, 2014 at 11:50:14 PM, robert shattuck bobolonius@... [johnmuirtrail] (johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com) wrote:

                     

                    James, 

                     Go for the Teva Hurrcaines XLT ( what I use )  or the Terra Fi Lite . . . . they're inexpensive, minimal . .  well made.  Contrary to what others seem to think, I've never needed the ones with the toe cap ( might as well wear white socks then and be european ) 

                    I'd stay away from the ones that lean more towards being a "water" sandal . . . they're probably a little lighter, but my guess is there's not as much protection under foot. 

                    You could also check out Chaco's, but they're a little on the pricier side. 

                    So maybe you've read my thoughts on Teva's  . . . I've had the experience of needing to wear something besides my boots when I've done things like, sprain my ankle which swelled up and of course, in years past got some blisters and found that by switching out, I could avoid rubbing them and just keep on truckin' , plus, it's just nice to switch out now and then and give the feet a new way to move, breath and just get generally re-energized . . . 

                    I've also seen people's boots totally fail and fall apart . . . so I've always thought, if you're gonna carry a camp shoe, why not one that does more than just sit around the fire. 

                    Bob


                    http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480




                    To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                    From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 22:54:19 -0700
                    Subject: RE: [John Muir Trail] Do you use your Teva's when...

                     

                    Bob,

                    I am needing a new pair of sandals for around home as the old ones are being retired and I know you love Teva's.


                    I was wondering if you could recommend a couple of models I could try and see how they work at home and I could add them to my gear. 


                    In the past I wore trail hikers and a pair of flip flops for in the tent or late night bathroom runs.


                    Thank you in advance.


                    Jamers

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