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SPOT Tracking Device

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  • shawnmnold
    What are peoples opinions on this? I m slightly considering getting one to satisfy my wife s concerns while I m on the trail. Can I buy a one month
    Message 1 of 20 , Jun 12, 2014

      What are peoples opinions on this?  I'm slightly considering getting one to satisfy my wife's concerns while I'm on the trail.

      Can I buy a one month subscription?

      Any thoughts or opinions will be appreciated.

    • ravi_jmt2013
      You can rent a SPOT 2 device for a month for $99 or you can purchase the device for less than $75 on Amazon and then purchase a one year basic subscription for
      Message 2 of 20 , Jun 12, 2014
        You can rent a SPOT 2 device for a month for $99 or you can purchase the device for less than $75 on Amazon and then purchase a one year basic subscription for $100.  It might be worth purchasing the unit if you plan to have other occasions to use it, but with technology progressing rapidly, I suspect that this type of device will be obsolete within a few years.  I rented a SPOT 2 for the JMT in 2013 and purchased a SPOT 2 earlier this year since my planned trips for 2014 could justify the cost vs renting.  I find the SPOT 2 to be a better value than the SPOT 3 for my usage pattern. 

        https://www.lowergear.com/product.php/id/261

         


        You could also look into renting a Delorme Inreach SE for $110/month plus usage.  The main advantage of the InReach over the SPOT is that you have two way text message capabilities and delivery confirmation. 

        https://www.lowergear.com/product.php?id=510

         

      • Ray Rippel
        Good day, Shawn, I loved mine. It was light, worked with only one change of lithium batteries at MTR (even though I had it on the auto-update every ten minutes
        Message 3 of 20 , Jun 12, 2014
          Good day, Shawn,

          I loved mine. It was light, worked with only one change of lithium batteries at MTR (even though I had it on the auto-update every ten minutes setting), and gave my wife lots of peace of mind. Since she has walked a part of the trail, she could also sort of imagine where I was. I could imagine her watching the icon progress across the screen, which made me feel just a little less "solo". 

          If you are going to stick pretty much to the trail, I can't say that it is really necessary. If you were to get hurt near the trail, someone would likely come across you in hours, if not minutes. The "in-case-of-emergency" aspects were, for me, least compelling. It was just kind of neat knowing that several people were following me online, could see where I camped, and could see me progress.

          One last comment. The first time it started working at Happy Isles and worked until I turned it off at Whitney Portal. The second time it didn't work until I was past Sunrise Creek. I have no idea why. (I did turn it off at night.)

          Good hiking, Ray

           

          Ray Rippel

          Author, Planning Your Thru-Hike of the John Muir Trail

          http://jmtbook.com/

          Follow me at: www.twitter.com/JMTBook


        • berdomb
          IMO, its pretty much a line of bull when people say they get it for someone else. Its a toy, it lets you send messages (limited) and track. If you want rescue
          Message 4 of 20 , Jun 13, 2014
            IMO, its pretty much a line of bull when people say they get it for someone else.  Its a toy, it lets you send messages (limited) and track. 

            If you want rescue ability, carry a real PLB.  No yearly subscription cost, way more reliable.  In 2 years you total cost will be less than the spot.

            By default, if your wife doesnt hear from SAR authorities, she can simply know that everything isOK.  There is no need for minute by minute updates.


          • ravi_jmt2013
            IMO, its pretty much a line of bull when people say they get it for someone else. Its a toy, it lets you send messages (limited) and track. It isn t a line of
            Message 5 of 20 , Jun 13, 2014
              IMO, its pretty much a line of bull when people say they get it for someone else.  Its a toy, it lets you send messages (limited) and track.

              It isn't a line of bull but reality for many of us.  Despite trying to educate family members who do not hike, I am frequently sent links about bear attacks (usually of the grizzly variety even though I don't hike in grizzly country), lightning strikes, rattlesnake bites, hypothermia, tick bites, mountain lions, waterfalls, drowning, and numerous other perceived hazards.  A daily or twice daily check in provides a great deal of reassurance for people who aren't really familiar with backcountry risks or are irrational even if they understand the true risks.  

              I don't have the SPOT for its emergency response feature and consider that an added bonus.  I do agree that a dedicated PLB is more likely to be useful for rescue situations compared to the SPOT but a PLB doesn't address my primary reason for carrying a device since it cannot be used for daily updates.
            • Roleigh Martin
              Berdomb, I beg to heavily disagree, not only on my experience, but also based upon what Yosemite Rangers have told me and other rangers. Backpackinglight.com
              Message 6 of 20 , Jun 13, 2014
                Berdomb,

                I beg to heavily disagree, not only on my experience, but also based upon what Yosemite Rangers have told me and other rangers.

                Backpackinglight.com did extensive, scientific study of the reliability of the SPOT and found it to be "highly recommended".  I've provided the link before, busy now; don't have time to do it.

                The Yosemite Rangers told me the SPOT rescue center is quicker on relaying an emergency signal than the NOAA (the government's own center).    I've told this story before, it involved a JMT hiker whose life was at high risk, as he needed an emergency appendectomy ASAP.

                The SPOT uses field-replaceable batteries.  The PLB recommends you send your PLB into the manufacturer for a battery replacement once used.  It costs anywhere from $100-$150 to do this.  What happens if you need to use the device to help another party out?  You just mail your PLB out at the next supply point and go the rest without it?  The SPOT will stay in use.

                I've owned two PLB devices.  I own a SPOT device.  The only thing that appeals to me above the SPOT is the Delorme Inreach Explorer.

                Your comment reads to me, if you want to get a real education, go to a public school.  The SPOT rescue service is akin to a very elite private school.  They know what they're doing.

                Roleigh


                -------------------------------------------------
                Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research links)
                _



                On Fri, Jun 13, 2014 at 6:40 AM, berdomb@... [johnmuirtrail] <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                 

                IMO, its pretty much a line of bull when people say they get it for someone else.  Its a toy, it lets you send messages (limited) and track. 


                If you want rescue ability, carry a real PLB.  No yearly subscription cost, way more reliable.  In 2 years you total cost will be less than the spot.

                By default, if your wife doesnt hear from SAR authorities, she can simply know that everything isOK.  There is no need for minute by minute updates.



              • Mike Bakewell
                For you. Sent from my iPod
                Message 7 of 20 , Jun 13, 2014
                  For you.

                  Sent from my iPod

                  On Jun 13, 2014, at 6:40 AM, "berdomb@... [johnmuirtrail]" <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                   

                  IMO, its pretty much a line of bull when people say they get it for someone else.  Its a toy, it lets you send messages (limited) and track. 


                  If you want rescue ability, carry a real PLB.  No yearly subscription cost, way more reliable.  In 2 years you total cost will be less than the spot.

                  By default, if your wife doesnt hear from SAR authorities, she can simply know that everything isOK.  There is no need for minute by minute updates.


                • Roleigh Martin
                  The link to the comprehensive testing document of the Spot Messenger by Backpackinglight.com Engineers is here: Citation SPOT2 Personal Locator Review and
                  Message 8 of 20 , Jun 13, 2014
                    The link to the comprehensive testing document of the Spot Messenger by Backpackinglight.com Engineers is here:

                    Citation
                    "SPOT2 Personal Locator Review and Extensive Field Test," by Alan Dixon and Amy Lauterbach. BackpackingLight.com (ISSN 1537-0364).

                    -------------------------------------------------
                    Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research links)
                    _



                    On Fri, Jun 13, 2014 at 7:13 AM, Roleigh Martin <roleigh@...> wrote:
                    Berdomb,

                    I beg to heavily disagree, not only on my experience, but also based upon what Yosemite Rangers have told me and other rangers.

                    Backpackinglight.com did extensive, scientific study of the reliability of the SPOT and found it to be "highly recommended".  I've provided the link before, busy now; don't have time to do it.

                    The Yosemite Rangers told me the SPOT rescue center is quicker on relaying an emergency signal than the NOAA (the government's own center).    I've told this story before, it involved a JMT hiker whose life was at high risk, as he needed an emergency appendectomy ASAP.

                    The SPOT uses field-replaceable batteries.  The PLB recommends you send your PLB into the manufacturer for a battery replacement once used.  It costs anywhere from $100-$150 to do this.  What happens if you need to use the device to help another party out?  You just mail your PLB out at the next supply point and go the rest without it?  The SPOT will stay in use.

                    I've owned two PLB devices.  I own a SPOT device.  The only thing that appeals to me above the SPOT is the Delorme Inreach Explorer.

                    Your comment reads to me, if you want to get a real education, go to a public school.  The SPOT rescue service is akin to a very elite private school.  They know what they're doing.

                    Roleigh


                    -------------------------------------------------
                    Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research links)
                    _



                    On Fri, Jun 13, 2014 at 6:40 AM, berdomb@... [johnmuirtrail] <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                     

                    IMO, its pretty much a line of bull when people say they get it for someone else.  Its a toy, it lets you send messages (limited) and track. 


                    If you want rescue ability, carry a real PLB.  No yearly subscription cost, way more reliable.  In 2 years you total cost will be less than the spot.

                    By default, if your wife doesnt hear from SAR authorities, she can simply know that everything isOK.  There is no need for minute by minute updates.




                  • Roleigh Martin
                    Here is the link to the previous discussions of Yosemite Rangers liking SPOT emergency rescue communication hand-off to Yose time versus NOAA (PLB s) emergency
                    Message 9 of 20 , Jun 13, 2014
                      Here is the link to the previous discussions of Yosemite Rangers liking SPOT emergency rescue communication hand-off to Yose time versus NOAA (PLB's) emergency rescue communication hand-off to Yose time.

                      https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/johnmuirtrail/search/messages?query=spot%20mcclure%20plb

                      -------------------------------------------------
                      Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research links)
                      _



                      On Fri, Jun 13, 2014 at 9:23 AM, Roleigh Martin <roleigh@...> wrote:
                      The link to the comprehensive testing document of the Spot Messenger by Backpackinglight.com Engineers is here:

                      Citation
                      "SPOT2 Personal Locator Review and Extensive Field Test," by Alan Dixon and Amy Lauterbach. BackpackingLight.com (ISSN 1537-0364).

                      -------------------------------------------------
                      Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research links)
                      _



                      On Fri, Jun 13, 2014 at 7:13 AM, Roleigh Martin <roleigh@...> wrote:
                      Berdomb,

                      I beg to heavily disagree, not only on my experience, but also based upon what Yosemite Rangers have told me and other rangers.

                      Backpackinglight.com did extensive, scientific study of the reliability of the SPOT and found it to be "highly recommended".  I've provided the link before, busy now; don't have time to do it.

                      The Yosemite Rangers told me the SPOT rescue center is quicker on relaying an emergency signal than the NOAA (the government's own center).    I've told this story before, it involved a JMT hiker whose life was at high risk, as he needed an emergency appendectomy ASAP.

                      The SPOT uses field-replaceable batteries.  The PLB recommends you send your PLB into the manufacturer for a battery replacement once used.  It costs anywhere from $100-$150 to do this.  What happens if you need to use the device to help another party out?  You just mail your PLB out at the next supply point and go the rest without it?  The SPOT will stay in use.

                      I've owned two PLB devices.  I own a SPOT device.  The only thing that appeals to me above the SPOT is the Delorme Inreach Explorer.

                      Your comment reads to me, if you want to get a real education, go to a public school.  The SPOT rescue service is akin to a very elite private school.  They know what they're doing.

                      Roleigh


                      -------------------------------------------------
                      Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research links)
                      _



                      On Fri, Jun 13, 2014 at 6:40 AM, berdomb@... [johnmuirtrail] <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                       

                      IMO, its pretty much a line of bull when people say they get it for someone else.  Its a toy, it lets you send messages (limited) and track. 


                      If you want rescue ability, carry a real PLB.  No yearly subscription cost, way more reliable.  In 2 years you total cost will be less than the spot.

                      By default, if your wife doesnt hear from SAR authorities, she can simply know that everything isOK.  There is no need for minute by minute updates.





                    • Roleigh Martin
                      Here is the link to the 2009 incident, reported by one of the hikers in the group on the JMT, who swears by the SPOT device. He gives the name of the Ranger
                      Message 10 of 20 , Jun 13, 2014
                        Here is the link to the 2009 incident, reported by one of the hikers in the group on the JMT, who swears by the SPOT device.  He gives the name of the Ranger too.  It was a perforated intestine which occurred on the hike that led to the need for immediate surgical attention.


                        -------------------------------------------------
                        Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research links)
                        _



                        On Fri, Jun 13, 2014 at 2:15 PM, Roleigh Martin <roleigh@...> wrote:
                        Here is the link to the previous discussions of Yosemite Rangers liking SPOT emergency rescue communication hand-off to Yose time versus NOAA (PLB's) emergency rescue communication hand-off to Yose time.

                        https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/johnmuirtrail/search/messages?query=spot%20mcclure%20plb

                        -------------------------------------------------
                        Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research links)
                        _



                        On Fri, Jun 13, 2014 at 9:23 AM, Roleigh Martin <roleigh@...> wrote:
                        The link to the comprehensive testing document of the Spot Messenger by Backpackinglight.com Engineers is here:

                        Citation
                        "SPOT2 Personal Locator Review and Extensive Field Test," by Alan Dixon and Amy Lauterbach. BackpackingLight.com (ISSN 1537-0364).

                        -------------------------------------------------
                        Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research links)
                        _



                        On Fri, Jun 13, 2014 at 7:13 AM, Roleigh Martin <roleigh@...> wrote:
                        Berdomb,

                        I beg to heavily disagree, not only on my experience, but also based upon what Yosemite Rangers have told me and other rangers.

                        Backpackinglight.com did extensive, scientific study of the reliability of the SPOT and found it to be "highly recommended".  I've provided the link before, busy now; don't have time to do it.

                        The Yosemite Rangers told me the SPOT rescue center is quicker on relaying an emergency signal than the NOAA (the government's own center).    I've told this story before, it involved a JMT hiker whose life was at high risk, as he needed an emergency appendectomy ASAP.

                        The SPOT uses field-replaceable batteries.  The PLB recommends you send your PLB into the manufacturer for a battery replacement once used.  It costs anywhere from $100-$150 to do this.  What happens if you need to use the device to help another party out?  You just mail your PLB out at the next supply point and go the rest without it?  The SPOT will stay in use.

                        I've owned two PLB devices.  I own a SPOT device.  The only thing that appeals to me above the SPOT is the Delorme Inreach Explorer.

                        Your comment reads to me, if you want to get a real education, go to a public school.  The SPOT rescue service is akin to a very elite private school.  They know what they're doing.

                        Roleigh


                        -------------------------------------------------
                        Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research links)
                        _



                        On Fri, Jun 13, 2014 at 6:40 AM, berdomb@... [johnmuirtrail] <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                         

                        IMO, its pretty much a line of bull when people say they get it for someone else.  Its a toy, it lets you send messages (limited) and track. 


                        If you want rescue ability, carry a real PLB.  No yearly subscription cost, way more reliable.  In 2 years you total cost will be less than the spot.

                        By default, if your wife doesnt hear from SAR authorities, she can simply know that everything isOK.  There is no need for minute by minute updates.






                      • berdomb
                        The spot has a well known track record of spotty performance, and outright failures. A PLB sends out a 5watt 406 mhz sattelite signal, a 121 mhz homing signal,
                        Message 11 of 20 , Jun 13, 2014
                          The spot has a well known track record of spotty performance, and outright failures.

                          A PLB sends out a 5watt 406 mhz sattelite signal, a 121 mhz homing signal, and transmits your gps coordinates.Spots 0.4 watt 1610 mhz signal is too weak to be used for location, it relies solely on gps.  The lower frequency of the PLB is much better at passing thru obstacles like tree cover as well.  Spot is known for being unable to get a good GPS lock under tree canopy as well.

                          A PLB communicates with more satelites, including polar orbits that spot does not, and provides more reliable coverage. This has been extensively written about . If you want to be found, a PLB is your choice.  If you want to be tracked, and possibly be found, consider a SPOT.





                        • Roleigh Martin
                          In an emergency, what counts is not only the reception of the signal but also the communication of that signal to the appropriate personnel in the fastest time
                          Message 12 of 20 , Jun 13, 2014
                            In an emergency, what counts is not only the reception of the signal but also the communication of that signal to the appropriate personnel in the fastest time too.

                            I know from 3 years use, that the SPOT transmission gets out on the JMT if one follows the instructions.

                            It seems to me, that there is no perfect solution.  A perfect solution would have the following properties:

                            1.  sends out the signal the best under the worst conditions
                            2.  the received signal is relayed to the appropriate authorities in the fastest time
                            3.  the sending device does not have to be sent back to the manufacturer once used -- ie, the sending device will use replaceable batteries or can be recharged via a USB cable.
                            4.  the sending device supports two way texting/emailing

                            The spot device fails property #4 for sure and although in theory it fails #1 per your criteria, for use on the JMT, it is very reliable.

                            I am going with the Delorme Inreach Explorer this year.  Others in the group I've organized are bringing their Spot.  Having redundancy is always a good solution.



                            -------------------------------------------------
                            Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research links)
                            _



                            On Fri, Jun 13, 2014 at 10:32 PM, berdomb@... [johnmuirtrail] <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                             

                            The spot has a well known track record of spotty performance, and outright failures.


                            A PLB sends out a 5watt 406 mhz sattelite signal, a 121 mhz homing signal, and transmits your gps coordinates.Spots 0.4 watt 1610 mhz signal is too weak to be used for location, it relies solely on gps.  The lower frequency of the PLB is much better at passing thru obstacles like tree cover as well.  Spot is known for being unable to get a good GPS lock under tree canopy as well.

                            A PLB communicates with more satelites, including polar orbits that spot does not, and provides more reliable coverage. This has been extensively written about . If you want to be found, a PLB is your choice.  If you want to be tracked, and possibly be found, consider a SPOT.






                          • berdomb
                            A distress signal is no good without location. The SPOT will send a distress signal, without gps coordinates if it doesnt have them. But then GEOS doesnt know
                            Message 13 of 20 , Jun 13, 2014
                              A distress signal is no good without location.

                              The SPOT will send a distress signal, without gps coordinates if it doesnt have them.
                              But then GEOS doesnt know who to contact!  so, they can do nothing.

                              People have died because of this.  Read about the sailboat Aegean .

                              Spot, has a total dependence on gps, and an unreliable track record at that. 
                              But its fun to track yourself.
                               


                            • Roleigh Martin
                              It s true the SPOT does not transmit a homing beacon, but the homing beacon is one additional power draw upon the device which is why the PLB manufacturer
                              Message 14 of 20 , Jun 13, 2014
                                It's true the SPOT does not transmit a homing beacon, but the homing beacon is one additional power draw upon the device which is why the PLB manufacturer recommends mailing the device back to the manufacturer once it's been used in an emergency.

                                On the JMT, having access to clear skies is very easy; it's not the A.T.  

                                My experience with the SPOT has predominantly been the JMT over 4 different trips.  I'm sure there are trails where a PLB might make a engineering difference, but if your signal transmissions get through for four years straight, what's the problem going another year?  It's the same trail.

                                I'm not knocking your decision to go with a PLB.  It's true you don't have a monthly subscription.  there are pros to the PLB.  There are also Pros to the SPOT.  Like I said there is no perfect solution.  It's a matter of pluses and minuses.

                                I've owned two PLB devices in my Sierra hiking years.  I'm very familiar with PLB devices.  My last PLB was a McMurdo Fast Find (or Fast Find Plus, I forget which).  It was like 2007 or 2008.







                                -------------------------------------------------
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                              • ravi_jmt2013
                                The SPOT will attempt to send a message three times over 20 minutes for a normal check in after it locks onto a GPS coordinate. The GPS lock is communicated
                                Message 15 of 20 , Jun 14, 2014
                                  The SPOT will attempt to send a message three times over 20 minutes for a normal check in after it locks onto a GPS coordinate.  The GPS lock is communicated to the user with a status light so you know if there is a GPS lock or if you have to move to a more open location (which obviously may not be possible in an emergency).  The SOS may be sent without a GPS lock, but that's a feature rather then a flaw since it is better for the SOS to go out even without a GPS lock rather than not at all.  The user's emergency contact would often know the person's rough location based on an itinerary or prior check ins. I believe that search and rescue would also have access to recent check ins as well which at the very least could narrow the search area.  Still, it isn't a perfect solution and a dedicated PLB emits a stronger signal and would be better if the only goal is seeking help.

                                  On the JMT I know of only one missed check in over several dozen. All had GPS coordinates. In all cases I waited the recommended 20 minutes to allow the SPOT to go through its full cycle. Over two weeks on the AT in the second half of April, I know of no missed checkins.  The SPOT seems to work well even through filtered tree cover when leaves are not fully out.  
                                • forgetwho
                                  Roleigh (and anyone else), would you post a review of the InReach when you get back? I m planning to rent one for my mid-August hike. Thanks. Gail
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Jun 14, 2014
                                    Roleigh (and anyone else), would you post a review of the InReach when you get back?  I'm planning to rent one for my mid-August hike.  Thanks.

                                    Gail
                                  • shawnmnold
                                    I m still debating this. May even elect to purchase the tracking only as this would be more to please my wife. Don t want her worrying 24/7. I m starting my
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Jun 14, 2014
                                      I'm still debating this.  May even elect to purchase the tracking only as this would be more to please my wife.  Don't want her worrying 24/7.  I'm starting my hike july 16th
                                    • mitchhike
                                      I will be carrying a Spot w/Tracking and a Satellite Phone to allow my wife to feel more comfortable about me hiking. Satellite phones are expense to rent, so
                                      Message 18 of 20 , Jun 15, 2014
                                        I will be carrying a Spot w/Tracking and a Satellite Phone to allow my wife to feel more comfortable about me hiking. Satellite phones are expense to rent, so i purchased an Iridium 9505A on ebay for $325, which i will selling on July 12. I start my hike June 26th..  
                                      • berdomb
                                        Satellite phones are not that expensive to rent. The airtime, is expensive. You can rent the 9505A you bought for 29.95 per week. Plus shipping and airtime.
                                        Message 19 of 20 , Jun 17, 2014
                                          Satellite phones are not that expensive to rent.  The airtime, is expensive. You can rent the 9505A you bought for 29.95 per week.  Plus shipping and airtime.
                                        • nedtibbits
                                          I seize every opportunity I get to comment on the value of hiking with a satellite phone and this Father’s Day was a case in point! Mountain Education ran a
                                          Message 20 of 20 , Jun 19, 2014
                                            I seize every opportunity I get to comment on the value of hiking with a satellite phone and this Father’s Day was a case in point!
                                             
                                            Mountain Education ran a Snow Advanced Course in Washington on the PCT from Harts Pass to the Canadian border. The conditions were expected to be steep and snow covered and they were! Add in heavy fog, sleet, snowing, or raining, put it all on a 30-40-degree pitch with trees below and no run-out and we had more than enough to deal with. Snowshoes were a danger in the wet, soupy, snow as they would not hold to the pitch (expected) because of an ice layer 6 inches below the surface slop. Crampons helped immensely to keep our balance and traction to the hill.
                                             
                                            However, one single, sudden posthole event caused one of our students to lose his balance and fall backwards, head-first down a short, steep slope into two 3” spruce trees, breaking 4 of his ribs and injuring his scalp. The fall happened at 0830, he was field evaluated and treated by 0850, and the request for a helicopter went out at 0855. The satellite phone enabled us to tell the Sheriff
                                            - exactly what had happened,
                                            - the current condition of the patient,
                                            - the resources (gear and people) we had on-hand,
                                            - where we were with UTM location,
                                            - the changing weather conditions there,
                                            - how the Landing Zone would be marked,
                                            - what we needed for the patient, and
                                            - his medical updates every hour.
                                             
                                            All this timely info kept SAR from sending in their Hasty Team (foot party), reassured the medical folks that the patient was trending stable, and got us the helicopter quicker, and that was the definitive treatment our patient needed!
                                             
                                            Now, talking from the SAR point of view (El Dorado, CA, and Douglas, NV), being able to freely communicate with a victim or people with him in the field helps us immeasurably prepare for and provide exactly what is needed. Otherwise, we don’t know what happened or what is needed until we get a Hasty Team to him, then the radio call for the next team to bring what he needs = time and treatment delays.
                                             
                                            I know a Sat phone is expensive and weighs a few ounces more, but from the medical care end of things, they really help!
                                             
                                             
                                            Ned Tibbits, Director
                                            Mountain Education
                                            www.mountaineducation.org
                                             
                                            Sent: Tuesday, June 17, 2014 6:45 PM
                                            Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: SPOT Tracking Device
                                             
                                             

                                            Satellite phones are not that expensive to rent.  The airtime, is expensive. You can rent the 9505A you bought for 29.95 per week.  Plus shipping and airtime.

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