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Best San Francisco source for trail-stable traditionally cured meats

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  • John Ladd
    I have a new favorite place to buy traditionally dry cured pork products for use on trail. It may also work for those of you who live or work in San Francisco
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 12, 2014
      I have a new favorite place to buy traditionally dry cured pork products for use on trail. 

      It may also work for those of you who live or work in San Francisco or those who pass through San Francisco on the way to the trail.  (It's within 5 blocks of my house, so swing by and say hello if you do come. Call first.)

      Porcellino is a combined restaurant/market. It features Boccalone brand cured salumi -- but has a better selection and more knowledgeable staff than I've found at Boccalone's own outlet in the Ferry Building -- which was my prior favorite. You can talk to them about which of the products require no refrigeration and which taste best. They will cut you thin slices to sample.


      They have Lardo Iberico (a.k.a. white prosciutto) but I particularly liked their Capocollo which has more protein. 

      Capocolla looks like this (Coppa is similar)




      Link to picture if you can't see it

      If you buy it, make sure to tell them you want it as a slab -- it is almost always sold (and eaten) sliced paper-thin so they will start slicing it for you unless you tell them to stop. 

      The stuff is not cheap but it has enough flavor (and calories) that a little goes a long way. You might ask them if they wil sell you the butt end of a piece for a reduced per-pound price since most people want the slices.

      These products are best sliced very, very thin, though you can dice them to add to pastas, soups, stews, etc. Diced Lardo is particularly good as a way to calorie-boost almost anything.

      The small utility knives you can find in art supply stores (using replaceable snap-off blades) will allow you to slice it prosciutto-thin in the field. Mine weighs 11 grams (under 1/2 oz). I usually carry one spare blade so I always have a really, really sharp one. 



      If you can't see the knife picture, see


      Or


      John Curran Ladd
      1616 Castro Street
      San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
      415-648-9279
    • longritchie
      The Boccalone porcine products look so tasty. I have stopped in at their store in the Ferry bldg many times but always walk out empty handed after reviewing
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 12, 2014
        The Boccalone porcine products look so tasty. I have stopped in at their store in the Ferry bldg many times but always walk out empty handed after reviewing the prices. I can only afford so many luxuries.

        Fortunately good old Gallo salami at the supermarket, while pedestrian, can last for many weeks unrefrigerated. And their unopened packages of sliced salame keep for months without refrigeration. Columbus makes an herb salame that I love. It's a little harder to find.

        Salami salame salulmi: Apparently salami is the plural of salame, although many people use the two interchangeably. Salumi is a class of cured meat products which makes salame a type of salumi. The words originate from the latin for salt, a mineral that was once as valuable as oil is today. People were once paid their salaries in salt, which they used as a sauce for their salads.

        I eat a lot of salame on the trail. It's not the most calorie dense food (too much water) or the best thing nutritionally (saturated fat) but it just works for me when on the trail. I almost never walk without it.
      • es
        So the salami will keep after opened for weeks unrefrigerated??? Thanks Eric
        Message 3 of 9 , Jun 12, 2014

          So the salami will keep after opened for weeks unrefrigerated???
          Thanks
          Eric

          On Jun 12, 2014 11:41 AM, "longritchie" <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
           

          The Boccalone porcine products look so tasty. I have stopped in at their store in the Ferry bldg many times but always walk out empty handed after reviewing the prices. I can only afford so many luxuries.

          Fortunately good old Gallo salami at the supermarket, while pedestrian, can last for many weeks unrefrigerated. And their unopened packages of sliced salame keep for months without refrigeration. Columbus makes an herb salame that I love. It's a little harder to find.

          Salami salame salulmi: Apparently salami is the plural of salame, although many people use the two interchangeably. Salumi is a class of cured meat products which makes salame a type of salumi. The words originate from the latin for salt, a mineral that was once as valuable as oil is today. People were once paid their salaries in salt, which they used as a sauce for their salads.

          I eat a lot of salame on the trail. It's not the most calorie dense food (too much water) or the best thing nutritionally (saturated fat) but it just works for me when on the trail. I almost never walk without it.

        • faridwatson
          Didn t for me.
          Message 4 of 9 , Jun 12, 2014
            Didn't for me.
          • John Ladd
            What I ve learned about salumis over the last few years of experimenting with them and talking to butchers: Salumia/Salamis were originally developed to
            Message 5 of 9 , Jun 12, 2014
              What I've learned about salumis over the last few years of experimenting with them and talking to butchers:

              Salumia/Salamis were originally developed to preserve meats without refrigeration. 

              Unfortunately, people started to refrigerate them.

              Then people started to assume they had to be refrigerated. Or were better refrigerated.

              Then sellers could use non-traditional (and cheaper) methods, since they could count on people refrigerating them. It takes time to properly cure salamis (months) and time is money to a food processor. 

              As a result, most grocery store salamis today have limited life outside the refrigerator. Some, however, do pretty well. The whole pepperonis seem to do especially well.

              Grocery stores often use the refrigeration cases to stock even the salamis that don't need it because their customers think they need refrigeration.

              For the most part, if you see salami in a store not in the refrigerator, it doesn't need refrigeration. 

              But if it IS in the refrigerator, you don't know. It might be there because it needs refrigeration or it might be there for marketing reasons -- because buyers think it needs refrigeration - you can't tell which.

              In a good deli, you will see some salamis in the refrigeration cases and some hanging from hooks. You usually will want the kind hanging from hooks, though even in a deli the marketing considerations may cause some traditional salamis to be in the refrigerated cases (and any that have been pre-sliced will be in the refrigeration cases)

              Rules of thumb:

              More traditional salamis last longer without refrigeration. They feel harder to the touch and dryer than less traditional salamis, which can be quite soft.

              Generally, the longer lasting salamis cost more (some lots more)

              Pre-slicing the salami will always shorten the time you can carry it on the trail. You're always going to be better off with an intact salami and a knife -- cut your slices off one end only.

              The words "cured', "smoked" and "double-smoked" tend to suggest longer life unrefrigerated.

              If you see a salami you are tempted by, purchase one several months in advance and keep it outside the refrigerator.  Make sure it stays OK. If you are nervous, buy a new one shortly before you leave.

              But you might want to bring the one you bought months in advance. They will lose weight as you air cure them. The Saags Landjaeger that I bought several months ago and stored on a shelf very loosely wrapped in paper is about 15% lighter than when I put it there and will be part of a test cooking tonight. A traditional dry Spanish Chorizo that I hung in the basement 3 weeks ago has dropped from 228 grams to 215 -- I'll test it just before I leave town.  



              John Curran Ladd
              1616 Castro Street
              San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
              415-648-9279


              On Thu, Jun 12, 2014 at 11:49 AM, es hikeinyo@... [johnmuirtrail] <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
               

              So the salami will keep after opened for weeks unrefrigerated???
              Thanks
              Eric

              On Jun 12, 2014 11:41 AM, "longritchie" <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
               

              The Boccalone porcine products look so tasty. I have stopped in at their store in the Ferry bldg many times but always walk out empty handed after reviewing the prices. I can only afford so many luxuries.

              Fortunately good old Gallo salami at the supermarket, while pedestrian, can last for many weeks unrefrigerated. And their unopened packages of sliced salame keep for months without refrigeration. Columbus makes an herb salame that I love. It's a little harder to find.

              Salami salame salulmi: Apparently salami is the plural of salame, although many people use the two interchangeably. Salumi is a class of cured meat products which makes salame a type of salumi. The words originate from the latin for salt, a mineral that was once as valuable as oil is today. People were once paid their salaries in salt, which they used as a sauce for their salads.

              I eat a lot of salame on the trail. It's not the most calorie dense food (too much water) or the best thing nutritionally (saturated fat) but it just works for me when on the trail. I almost never walk without it.


            • longritchie
              So the salami will keep after opened for weeks unrefrigerated??? No, not opened. I meant unopened, uncut salame chubs . And I think it depends on the type.
              Message 6 of 9 , Jun 12, 2014
                "So the salami will keep after opened for weeks unrefrigerated???"

                No, not opened. I meant unopened, uncut salame "chubs". And I think it depends on the type. Some salame packages clearly state that refrigeration is required even unopened. The Gallo salame has a coating of whilte mold and only need refrigeration after this is breached. You'll often see them hanging unrefrigerated in stores. I've sent 8oz and 13oz Gallo "chubs" to MTR weeks in advance and they were perfectly fine. I've also kept them at home for as long as 6 months at room temperature. They dry out but don't become dangerous to eat. I've got one at home right now that spent the winter in a cache in the Sierra. It looks okay. The package doesn't even have a pull date printed on it. I try not to eat pork at home though.

                Once cut open the clock starts to tick. In a cool mountain environment I find they last long enough for me to eat them, several days to a week no problem. But if they were getting very warm I'd be wary.
              • jyeider@ymail.com
                John:  Could you please realist the name and or contact info of your neighborhood meat market.  I accidentally deleted or lost it. Thank you Jeff Yeider Sent
                Message 7 of 9 , Jun 12, 2014
                  John: 
                  Could you please realist the name and or contact info of your neighborhood meat market. 
                  I accidentally deleted or lost it.
                  Thank you
                  Jeff Yeider



                  Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S™ III, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
                • John Ladd
                  Jeff Porcellino is the place with the expensive but very good traditionally preserved meats. Lucca Deli
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jun 12, 2014
                    Jeff

                    Porcellino is the place with the expensive but very good traditionally preserved meats.

                    Lucca Deli  on Valencia isn't bad either and will save you some $$

                    Drewes Meats also stocks things like double-smoked bacon and duck meat and fat for confiting.

                    All in my neighborhood.

                    John Curran Ladd
                    1616 Castro Street
                    San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
                    415-648-9279


                    On Thu, Jun 12, 2014 at 1:17 PM, 'jyeider@...' jyeider@... [johnmuirtrail] <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                     

                    John: 
                    Could you please realist the name and or contact info of your neighborhood meat market. 
                    I accidentally deleted or lost it.
                    Thank you
                    Jeff Yeider



                    Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S™ III, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone


                  • jyeider@ymail.com
                    Thank you John Jeff Yeider Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S™ III, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone Thank you John Jeff Yeider Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S™ III, an
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jun 12, 2014
                      Thank you John
                      Jeff Yeider


                      Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S™ III, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
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