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wood stoves on the JMT

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  • Talon
    well after reading all the posts. I m sorry to say a lot of you didn t read mine .. no I don t advocate bonfires .. no the stove I was asking about is a twig
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 25, 2009
      well after reading all the posts. I'm sorry to say
      a lot of you didn't read mine ..

      no I don't advocate bonfires .. no the stove I was asking
      about is a twig stove ..

      http://www.nimblewillnomad.com/stove.htm

      and if I'm correct it was used by a thru hiker on the
      PCT.. (if I remember correctly).

      and a good downfall could provide enough fuel for this type
      of stove for a ton of hikers.

      I also would use it to supplement my regular fuel, be it
      can or bottle. (haven't decided yet:-)

      so was just asking...

      Talon
    • Stuart Dodson
      I made a Nimblewill stove and it works well,mainly because you don t have to break the twigs so much as they can overhang the end and then be pushed in as they
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 25, 2009
        I made a Nimblewill stove and it works well,mainly because you don't have to break the twigs so much as they can overhang the end and then be pushed in as they burn a bit like an open fire,and it keeps the twigs off the ground. I now have a bushbuddy type ,IMO a much better piece of kit but not really comparing like with like.I don't think either stove isĀ  suitable for the JMT. Apart from the fire risk ,in a lot of places you would have to search for the wood and take it from the critters.The big advantagewith the wood stove is that you don't have to worry about fuel economy ,and in the right areas can cook more, boil more water for washing and cleaning.Fine on the AT.

        --- On Wed, 2/25/09, Talon <h_talon@...> wrote:
        From: Talon <h_talon@...>
        Subject: [John Muir Trail] wood stoves on the JMT
        To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, February 25, 2009, 8:21 AM














        well after reading all the posts. I'm sorry to say

        a lot of you didn't read mine ..



        no I don't advocate bonfires .. no the stove I was asking

        about is a twig stove ..



        http://www.nimblewi llnomad.com/ stove.htm



        and if I'm correct it was used by a thru hiker on the

        PCT.. (if I remember correctly).



        and a good downfall could provide enough fuel for this type

        of stove for a ton of hikers.



        I also would use it to supplement my regular fuel, be it

        can or bottle. (haven't decided yet:-)



        so was just asking...



        Talon































        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jim W
        ... ... I have used simple tin can stoves and the fan-assisted Sierra Zip. Neither uses much wood- a handful or two of twigs, pine cones, etc. will get you
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 25, 2009
          On Wed, Feb 25, 2009 at 12:21 AM, Talon <h_talon@...> wrote:
          >
          > no I don't advocate bonfires .. no the stove I was asking
          > about is a twig stove ..
          >
          > http://www.nimblewillnomad.com/stove.htm
          ...

          I have used simple tin can stoves and the fan-assisted Sierra Zip.
          Neither uses much wood- a handful or two of twigs, pine cones, etc.
          will get you through a meal. The reason I stopped using them is the
          bother. I like to jump out of bed and start hiking right away, then
          stop for breakfast/choffee once the sun warms things up a bit. With
          my Jetboil canister stove I have hot water three minutes after pulling
          it from my pack, and after I'm done it only takes a few seconds to put
          it all away. The wood stove was just way too much bother for this
          sort of mid-day stop.

          Jim
          JMT 2008
          ??? 2009
        • Stuart Dodson
          Jim is right I reckon .I usually have pop can stove,a few oz of alcohol and a few esbit to cover all angles and breakfast,Just woodburn at night for food and
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 25, 2009
            Jim is right I reckon .I usually have pop can stove,a few oz of alcohol and a few esbit to cover all angles and breakfast,Just woodburn at night for food and recreation,fire is so good to tend I think.

            --- On Wed, 2/25/09, Jim W <jimqpublic@...> wrote:
            From: Jim W <jimqpublic@...>
            Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] wood stoves on the JMT
            To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Wednesday, February 25, 2009, 1:34 PM












            On Wed, Feb 25, 2009 at 12:21 AM, Talon <h_talon@yahoo. com> wrote:

            >

            > no I don't advocate bonfires .. no the stove I was asking

            > about is a twig stove ..

            >

            > http://www.nimblewi llnomad.com/ stove.htm

            ....



            I have used simple tin can stoves and the fan-assisted Sierra Zip.

            Neither uses much wood- a handful or two of twigs, pine cones, etc.

            will get you through a meal. The reason I stopped using them is the

            bother. I like to jump out of bed and start hiking right away, then

            stop for breakfast/choffee once the sun warms things up a bit. With

            my Jetboil canister stove I have hot water three minutes after pulling

            it from my pack, and after I'm done it only takes a few seconds to put

            it all away. The wood stove was just way too much bother for this

            sort of mid-day stop.



            Jim

            JMT 2008

            ??? 2009





























            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • jason
            I know you were referring to a twig burning stove. I just tend to look on the scale of hundreds of users, like we get in many on-trail backcounty areas. I
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 26, 2009
              I know you were referring to a twig burning stove. I just tend to look
              on the scale of hundreds of users, like we get in many on-trail
              backcounty areas.

              I actually really like the idea of twig burning stoves, I'm just not
              thrilled about the impact issue. Maybe in off-trail use?


              --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Talon" <h_talon@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > well after reading all the posts. I'm sorry to say
              > a lot of you didn't read mine ..
              >
              > no I don't advocate bonfires .. no the stove I was asking
              > about is a twig stove ..
              >
              > http://www.nimblewillnomad.com/stove.htm
              >
              > and if I'm correct it was used by a thru hiker on the
              > PCT.. (if I remember correctly).
              >
              > and a good downfall could provide enough fuel for this type
              > of stove for a ton of hikers.
              >
              > I also would use it to supplement my regular fuel, be it
              > can or bottle. (haven't decided yet:-)
              >
              > so was just asking...
              >
              > Talon
              >
            • Kevin Aston
              I have hiked for miles along the trail were there is nothing but snow, weeds, grass or rocks. I would rather pack a can of gas and have to worry about
              Message 6 of 6 , Feb 28, 2009
                I have hiked for miles along the trail were there is nothing but snow, weeds, grass or rocks. I would rather pack a can of gas and have to worry about disposing of the can, than to have to try to get enough heat out of the wet grass so I wouldn't have to crunch down my freeze dried stuff. There are also signs along much of the trail saying no fires above 10,000 feet.

                Life is what you make it.
                Planning ahead is half the fun.
                Kevin Aston
                www.kevinaston.com

                --- On Wed, 2/25/09, Talon <h_talon@...> wrote:
                From: Talon <h_talon@...>
                Subject: [John Muir Trail] wood stoves on the JMT
                To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Wednesday, February 25, 2009, 1:21 AM














                well after reading all the posts. I'm sorry to say

                a lot of you didn't read mine ..



                no I don't advocate bonfires .. no the stove I was asking

                about is a twig stove ..



                http://www.nimblewi llnomad.com/ stove.htm



                and if I'm correct it was used by a thru hiker on the

                PCT.. (if I remember correctly).



                and a good downfall could provide enough fuel for this type

                of stove for a ton of hikers.



                I also would use it to supplement my regular fuel, be it

                can or bottle. (haven't decided yet:-)



                so was just asking...



                Talon




























                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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