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Interesting thread at FB - For those who finished the JMT, what is ONE thing you wished you had done differently?

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  • John Ladd
    The Facebook JMT group has an interesting thread that started with this question *For those who finished the JMT, what is one thing you wished you had done
    Message 1 of 30 , Jan 24, 2014
      The Facebook JMT group has an interesting thread that started with this question

      For those who finished the JMT, what is one thing you wished you had done differently?

      Ordinarily, I think our Yahoo format allows better discussions as it encourages rather detailed replies. 

      But the FB group prompts a lot of fast, pithy replies. This one is getting ton of responses (72 in 16 hours so far) and is good for looking for patterns of common problems. A fairly substantial number of people wanted more calories, more food variety, a slower pace and more side trips. 2 of the 72 recommended less weight, though some people did mention particular gear they would have left behind (e.g., books, camera).

      Gives you a chance to learn from what some people decided were their mistakes. If you are a FB member and want to join that group just search for John Muir trail.

      I'm planning on including a tabulation of the responses by category in my survey summary. I had some similar questions on the survey and they work well with the FB thread.

      If you are not a FB member, I encourage you to post a single thought here. And no bragging about what you did right - only the one thing you think you did wrong on your most recent trip. That's the beauty of the FB question, as it avoids the "I'm so cool" problem.

      If you are a member of FB, please avoid double-posting.

      My biggest mistake on the last trip was not making myself eat all the food I carried. I got bored with my lunches and snacks and stopped eating them all and ended up losing to much weight and getting almost lethargic. As I was already marginal on calories carried (due to more days between resupplies than anticipated) the failure to make myself eat all my food -- even the boring food -- compounded the problem. (It's not a double posting - on FB I only summarized my impressions of the survey results)

      John Curran Ladd
      1616 Castro Street
      San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
      415-648-9279
    • Jim Seamans
      I wore a new brand of hiking shoes that I had never used before, that caused me to end my trip at Kearsarge Pass.
      Message 2 of 30 , Jan 24, 2014
        I wore a new brand of hiking shoes that I had never used before, that caused me to end my trip at Kearsarge Pass.
      • john_friend
        My biggest mistake was not planning enough calories for big mileage days later in the trip (presumably when more of the easy to burn body fat has been
        Message 3 of 30 , Jan 24, 2014

          My biggest mistake was not planning enough calories for big mileage days later in the trip (presumably when more of the easy to burn body fat has been consumed).  I planned for and consumed 3000 calories/day every day, but on two occasions, the day after an 18 mile day, I was seriously suffering from low energy and only recovered after cutting the day's mileage short of the plan and then finally eating dinner.  

          On one day (the day after an 18 mile day), I was so tired and low energy that I kept stopping and laying down to take a short nap, but the resting didn't help me recover in any way.  Finally, I set up camp short of my planned goal for the day, felt cold and chilled and crawled into my tent to take a nap, but didn't sleep. As it was getting late in the day, I decided to cook dinner and within 30 minutes of eating dinner I suddenly felt refreshed and full of energy again.  Lesson learned.


          Next time, I would bring some supplemental calorie packs for big mileage days later in the trip and make sure to consume them on those days.

        • Robert
          Informative post John! I think hikers that put in bigger mileage days severely underestimate the calories they need, or what they are burning. I ve had the
          Message 4 of 30 , Jan 24, 2014
            Informative post John! I think hikers that put in bigger mileage days severely underestimate the calories they need, or what they are burning. I've had the same thing happen to me in 2010, but fortunately it was towards the end of my hike. My appetite increased beyond what I had ever experienced before on about day 4, and I cut into my food supply that I ended up needing later. We did run into a 'trail angel' near Whitney that gave us some homemade power bars....yum!

            --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <yahoo@...> wrote:
            >
            > My biggest mistake was not planning enough calories for big mileage days later in the trip (presumably when more of the easy to burn body fat has been consumed). I planned for and consumed 3000 calories/day every day, but on two occasions, the day after an 18 mile day, I was seriously suffering from low energy and only recovered after cutting the day's mileage short of the plan and then finally eating dinner.
            > On one day (the day after an 18 mile day), I was so tired and low energy that I kept stopping and laying down to take a short nap, but the resting didn't help me recover in any way. Finally, I set up camp short of my planned goal for the day, felt cold and chilled and crawled into my tent to take a nap, but didn't sleep. As it was getting late in the day, I decided to cook dinner and within 30 minutes of eating dinner I suddenly felt refreshed and full of energy again. Lesson learned.
            >
            >
            > Next time, I would bring some supplemental calorie packs for big mileage days later in the trip and make sure to consume them on those days.
            >
          • ravi_jmt2013
            Did not understand how much more food I would need after MTR. The eight days of food I packed lasted seven days instead so I finished up a day early and then
            Message 5 of 30 , Jan 24, 2014

              Did not understand how much more food I would need after MTR. The eight days of food I packed lasted seven days instead so I finished up a day early and then waited a couple days in Lone Pine before catching the next bus to Reno on Monday.

            • nedtibbits
              And this was my observation of many of our students along the snow-covered JMT. They do just fine energy-wise the first 4 or so days (I think this varies based
              Message 6 of 30 , Jan 24, 2014
                And this was my observation of many of our students along the snow-covered JMT.
                 
                They do just fine energy-wise the first 4 or so days (I think this varies based on starting body fat), then they start getting Really Hungry (and we don’t do more than 10 miles per day over snow, though it takes all day and feels like a 24-miler!) and don’t have enough food to maintain the strength or endurance desires.
                 
                Our motto for snow-hiking:  “Cut your summer-trail mileage expectations in Half and Double the food!”
                 
                 
                Ned Tibbits, Director
                Mountain Education
                www.mountaineducation.org
                 
                From: Robert
                Sent: Friday, January 24, 2014 11:00 AM
                Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: Interesting thread at FB - For those who finished the JMT, what is ONE thing you wished you had done differently?
                 
                 

                Informative post John! I think hikers that put in bigger mileage days severely underestimate the calories they need, or what they are burning. I've had the same thing happen to me in 2010, but fortunately it was towards the end of my hike. My appetite increased beyond what I had ever experienced before on about day 4, and I cut into my food supply that I ended up needing later. We did run into a 'trail angel' near Whitney that gave us some homemade power bars....yum!

                --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <yahoo@...> wrote:

                >
                > My biggest mistake was not planning enough calories for
                big mileage days later in the trip (presumably when more of the easy to burn body fat has been consumed). I planned for and consumed 3000 calories/day every day, but on two occasions, the day after an 18 mile day, I was seriously suffering from low energy and only recovered after cutting the day's mileage short of the plan and then finally eating dinner.
                > On one day (the day
                after an 18 mile day), I was so tired and low energy that I kept stopping and laying down to take a short nap, but the resting didn't help me recover in any way. Finally, I set up camp short of my planned goal for the day, felt cold and chilled and crawled into my tent to take a nap, but didn't sleep. As it was getting late in the day, I decided to cook dinner and within 30 minutes of eating dinner I suddenly felt refreshed and full of energy again. Lesson learned.
                >
                >
                > Next time, I would bring some supplemental
                calorie packs for big mileage days later in the trip and make sure to consume them on those days.
                >

              • Robert
                That is about what I figure on cross country travel as well. half the mileage, double the calories . It s definitely a mistake I am trying not to repeat!!
                Message 7 of 30 , Jan 24, 2014
                  That is about what I figure on cross country travel as well. " half the mileage, double the calories". It's definitely a mistake I am trying not to repeat!! :)! Good info.

                  --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <ned@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > And this was my observation of many of our students along the snow-covered JMT.
                  >
                  > They do just fine energy-wise the first 4 or so days (I think this varies based on starting body fat), then they start getting Really Hungry (and we don’t do more than 10 miles per day over snow, though it takes all day and feels like a 24-miler!) and don’t have enough food to maintain the strength or endurance desires.
                  >
                  > Our motto for snow-hiking: “Cut your summer-trail mileage expectations in Half and Double the food!”
                  >
                  >
                  > Ned Tibbits, Director
                  > Mountain Education
                  > www.mountaineducation.org
                  >
                  > From: Robert
                  > Sent: Friday, January 24, 2014 11:00 AM
                  > To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: Interesting thread at FB - For those who finished the JMT, what is ONE thing you wished you had done differently?
                  >
                  >
                  > Informative post John! I think hikers that put in bigger mileage days severely underestimate the calories they need, or what they are burning. I've had the same thing happen to me in 2010, but fortunately it was towards the end of my hike. My appetite increased beyond what I had ever experienced before on about day 4, and I cut into my food supply that I ended up needing later. We did run into a 'trail angel' near Whitney that gave us some homemade power bars....yum!
                  >
                  > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <yahoo@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > My biggest mistake was not planning enough calories for big mileage days later in the trip (presumably when more of the easy to burn body fat has been consumed). I planned for and consumed 3000 calories/day every day, but on two occasions, the day after an 18 mile day, I was seriously suffering from low energy and only recovered after cutting the day's mileage short of the plan and then finally eating dinner.
                  > > On one day (the day after an 18 mile day), I was so tired and low energy that I kept stopping and laying down to take a short nap, but the resting didn't help me recover in any way. Finally, I set up camp short of my planned goal for the day, felt cold and chilled and crawled into my tent to take a nap, but didn't sleep. As it was getting late in the day, I decided to cook dinner and within 30 minutes of eating dinner I suddenly felt refreshed and full of energy again. Lesson learned.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Next time, I would bring some supplemental calorie packs for big mileage days later in the trip and make sure to consume them on those days.
                  > >
                  >
                • Deborah Rhoton
                  My last section hike (TM to VVR), Aug 2013, we took my 14 year old step son and had to bail the 10 day planned hike on day 4. He was miserable and wasn t ready
                  Message 8 of 30 , Jan 24, 2014
                    My last section hike (TM to VVR), Aug 2013, we took my 14 year old step son and had to bail the 10 day planned hike on day 4. He was miserable and wasn't ready for such a big adventure.  We took the river trail into Agnew Meadows.  Looking back now we would have not taken him at all.

                    Sent from my iPhone

                    On Jan 24, 2014, at 11:17 AM, John Ladd <johnladd@...> wrote:

                     

                    The Facebook JMT group has an interesting thread that started with this question

                    For those who finished the JMT, what is one thing you wished you had done differently?

                    Ordinarily, I think our Yahoo format allows better discussions as it encourages rather detailed replies. 

                    But the FB group prompts a lot of fast, pithy replies. This one is getting ton of responses (72 in 16 hours so far) and is good for looking for patterns of common problems. A fairly substantial number of people wanted more calories, more food variety, a slower pace and more side trips. 2 of the 72 recommended less weight, though some people did mention particular gear they would have left behind (e.g., books, camera).

                    Gives you a chance to learn from what some people decided were their mistakes. If you are a FB member and want to join that group just search for John Muir trail.

                    I'm planning on including a tabulation of the responses by category in my survey summary. I had some similar questions on the survey and they work well with the FB thread.

                    If you are not a FB member, I encourage you to post a single thought here. And no bragging about what you did right - only the one thing you think you did wrong on your most recent trip. That's the beauty of the FB question, as it avoids the "I'm so cool" problem.

                    If you are a member of FB, please avoid double-posting.

                    My biggest mistake on the last trip was not making myself eat all the food I carried. I got bored with my lunches and snacks and stopped eating them all and ended up losing to much weight and getting almost lethargic. As I was already marginal on calories carried (due to more days between resupplies than anticipated) the failure to make myself eat all my food -- even the boring food -- compounded the problem. (It's not a double posting - on FB I only summarized my impressions of the survey results)

                    John Curran Ladd
                    1616 Castro Street
                    San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
                    415-648-9279

                  • brucelem12
                    Hiking the JMT - One thing I wished I had done differently (Good idea John.) Last year I regretted not having pliers ( i.e. as part of a mini multi tool ).
                    Message 9 of 30 , Jan 25, 2014
                      "Hiking the JMT - One thing I wished I had done differently" (Good idea John.)

                      Last year I regretted not having pliers ( i.e. as part of a mini multi tool ).
                      Both zippers failed on my Zpacks Hexamid, and I had no way to tighten / fix them. I always have a few safety pins in my repair kit, but still a nuisance...especially since I'm now at the age where I have to get up about 3 times every night.
                      (By the way, I still think that tent is excellent...just part of the tradeoff of super light gear, (super light/small zippers widening after several seasons use in this case). A quick pinch of tiny pliers fixes them fine.)
                      Bruce
                    • Robert
                      Good to know Bruce, since I just sent my Hexamid in to have the screen added! I figured I would probably want it going in late June this year.
                      Message 10 of 30 , Jan 25, 2014
                        Good to know Bruce, since I just sent my Hexamid in to have the screen added! I figured I would probably want it going in late June this year.

                        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, brucelem12 <no_reply@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > "Hiking the JMT - One thing I wished I had done differently" (Good idea John.)
                        >
                        > Last year I regretted not having pliers ( i.e. as part of a mini multi tool ).
                        > Both zippers failed on my Zpacks Hexamid, and I had no way to tighten / fix them. I always have a few safety pins in my repair kit, but still a nuisance...especially since I'm now at the age where I have to get up about 3 times every night.
                        > (By the way, I still think that tent is excellent...just part of the tradeoff of super light gear, (super light/small zippers widening after several seasons use in this case). A quick pinch of tiny pliers fixes them fine.)
                        > Bruce
                        >
                      • kennethjessett@sbcglobal.net
                        I m not familiar with the Hexamid zips, but it is useful to attach a length of ribbon to the eye of any zipper for ease of pulling. Ken.
                        Message 11 of 30 , Jan 25, 2014
                          I'm not familiar with the Hexamid zips, but it is useful to attach a length of ribbon to the eye of any zipper for ease of pulling.

                          Ken.

                          --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, brucelem12 <no_reply@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > "Hiking the JMT - One thing I wished I had done differently" (Good idea John.)
                          >
                          > Last year I regretted not having pliers ( i.e. as part of a mini multi tool ).
                          > Both zippers failed on my Zpacks Hexamid, and I had no way to tighten / fix them. I always have a few safety pins in my repair kit, but still a nuisance...especially since I'm now at the age where I have to get up about 3 times every night.
                          >
                        • cehauser1
                          Next time, I won t bring a mosquito head net, toilet paper, or ProMax protein bars (they taste like sawdust).
                          Message 12 of 30 , Jan 27, 2014

                            Next time, I won't bring a mosquito head net, toilet paper, or ProMax protein bars (they taste like sawdust).

                          • Robert
                            I have had the same result with protein bars. They taste. Alright at home after a workout, but for some reason my appetite changes for them on the trail.
                            Message 13 of 30 , Jan 28, 2014
                              I have had the same result with protein bars. They taste. Alright at home after a workout, but for some reason my appetite changes for them on the trail.

                              Chris, why no mosquito head net? Just out of curiosity. They are a nuisance, particularly when trying to eat, but can save my sanity when it's high bug season;) ! Ok, maybe MY sanity was gone long ago, but I digress;) !



                              --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <cehauser1@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Next time, I won't bring a mosquito head net, toilet paper, or ProMax protein bars (they taste like sawdust).
                              >
                            • Jo T
                              Just one?! I would rest more along the way. JoT. ... On Mon, 1/27/14, cehauser1@yahoo.com wrote: Subject: [John Muir Trail] RE:
                              Message 14 of 30 , Jan 28, 2014
                                Just one?!
                                I would rest more along the way.
                                JoT.
                                --------------------------------------------
                                On Mon, 1/27/14, cehauser1@... <cehauser1@...> wrote:

                                Subject: [John Muir Trail] RE: Interesting thread at FB - For those who finished the JMT, what is ONE thing you wished you had done differently?
                                To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                                Date: Monday, January 27, 2014, 11:06 PM



                                Next time, I won't bring a mosquito head
                                net, toilet paper, or ProMax protein bars (they taste like
                                sawdust).
                              • Larry Beck
                                I would eat more and, I ll never, never, never eat another salmon cup! Larry ________________________________ From: Jo T To:
                                Message 15 of 30 , Jan 28, 2014
                                  I would eat more and, I'll never, never, never eat another salmon cup!
                                   
                                  Larry
                                  From: Jo T <jotslibrarylist@...>
                                  To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Tuesday, January 28, 2014 8:26 AM
                                  Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] RE: Interesting thread at FB - For those who finished the JMT, what is ONE thing you wished you had done differently?
                                   
                                  Just one?!
                                  I would rest more along the way.
                                  JoT.
                                  --------------------------------------------
                                  On Mon, 1/27/14, cehauser1@... <cehauser1@...> wrote:

                                  Subject: [John Muir Trail] RE: Interesting thread at FB - For those who finished the JMT, what is ONE thing you wished you had done differently?
                                  To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                                  Date: Monday, January 27, 2014, 11:06 PM



                                  Next time, I won't bring a mosquito head
                                  net, toilet paper, or ProMax protein bars (they taste like
                                  sawdust).



                                • cehauser1
                                  Robert: Protein Bars: Exactly... they are tolerable in civilization, but not on the trail. I d prefer other sources of protein: Snickers, Payday, peanut
                                  Message 16 of 30 , Jan 30, 2014

                                    Robert:


                                    Protein Bars:  Exactly... they are tolerable in civilization, but not on the trail.  I'd prefer other sources of protein:  Snickers, Payday, peanut M&Ms, peanut butter, turkey jerky, cashews, almonds, etc etc.


                                    Mosquito Net:  I knew someone would call me on that one.  A technicality actually, since I would always bring a mosquito net on any future trip, but I didn't need one on that particular trip (late August 2013).  I saw a grand total of 6 mosquitoes, all 6 of them were at Sallie Keyes Lake, and they were hungry.


                                    Carry on!


                                    Chris.

                                  • Lori MacDonald
                                    Message 17 of 30 , Jan 30, 2014
                                      On Jan 30, 2014, at 7:56 PM, <cehauser1@...> <cehauser1@...> wrote:

                                      >
                                      > Robert:
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Protein Bars: Exactly... they are tolerable in civilization, but not on the trail. I'd prefer other sources of protein: Snickers, Payday, peanut M&Ms, peanut butter, turkey jerky, cashews, almonds, etc etc.
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Mosquito Net: I knew someone would call me on that one. A technicality actually, since I would always bring a mosquito net on any future trip, but I didn't need one on that particular trip (late August 2013). I saw a grand total of 6 mosquitoes, all 6 of them were at Sallie Keyes Lake, and they were hungry.
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Carry on!
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Chris.
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                    • bradonjmt
                                      My July -- August 2013 trip went well but I wish I had been mentally more prepared for the problems associated with forest fires (the Aspen fire), especially
                                      Message 18 of 30 , Feb 2, 2014

                                        My July -- August 2013 trip went well but I wish I had been mentally more prepared for the problems associated with forest fires (the "Aspen" fire), especially hiking for days in heavy smoke.  The JMT Yahoo group discussions were excellent preparation for the trip, except on the topic of fire (perhaps this had been discussed more in the past).  

                                      • Roleigh Martin
                                        My memory is weak here but I think the more prone to fail zippers are #3 zippers. I have had same problem. I have done 2 things differently. One when I order a
                                        Message 19 of 30 , Feb 2, 2014
                                          My memory is weak here but I think the more prone to fail zippers are #3 zippers. I have had same problem. I have done 2 things differently. One when I order a custom made tent I offer to pay more for the next more rugged zipper which I think is a #5. Second when I have a tent zipper replaced I go for the # 5 zipper. 

                                          Sent from my iPhone
                                          See my Google Profile for interesting research links:
                                          http://tinyurl.com/3vnolh8

                                          On Jan 25, 2014, at 10:00 AM, brucelem12 <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                           

                                          "Hiking the JMT - One thing I wished I had done differently" (Good idea John.)

                                          Last year I regretted not having pliers ( i.e. as part of a mini multi tool ).
                                          Both zippers failed on my Zpacks Hexamid, and I had no way to tighten / fix them. I always have a few safety pins in my repair kit, but still a nuisance...especially since I'm now at the age where I have to get up about 3 times every night.
                                          (By the way, I still think that tent is excellent...just part of the tradeoff of super light gear, (super light/small zippers widening after several seasons use in this case). A quick pinch of tiny pliers fixes them fine.)
                                          Bruce

                                        • Roleigh Martin
                                          I gave up on protein bars years ago and favor Larabars but protein comes from Grass-fed all natural 100% isolate Whey protein (Energyfirst.com) and / or Great
                                          Message 20 of 30 , Feb 2, 2014
                                            I gave up on protein bars years ago and favor Larabars but protein comes from Grass-fed all natural 100% isolate Whey protein (Energyfirst.com) and / or Great tasting Jerky. I favor Tankabytes. 

                                            Sent from my iPhone
                                            See my Google Profile for interesting research links:
                                            http://tinyurl.com/3vnolh8

                                            On Jan 28, 2014, at 6:03 AM, "Robert" <rnperky@...> wrote:

                                             

                                            I have had the same result with protein bars. They taste. Alright at home after a workout, but for some reason my appetite changes for them on the trail.

                                            Chris, why no mosquito head net? Just out of curiosity. They are a nuisance, particularly when trying to eat, but can save my sanity when it's high bug season;) ! Ok, maybe MY sanity was gone long ago, but I digress;) !

                                            --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <cehauser1@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > Next time, I won't bring a mosquito head net, toilet paper, or ProMax protein bars (they taste like sawdust).
                                            >

                                          • bperluss
                                            Before I left on my JMT hike last summer, my sister gave me a small sampling of coconut milk powder from Wilderness Family Naturals (the best company for
                                            Message 21 of 30 , Feb 3, 2014

                                              Before I left on my JMT hike last summer, my sister gave me a small sampling of coconut milk powder from Wilderness Family Naturals (the best company for coconut products I've seen so far). It is fairly light weight and full of fat and calories and SO yummy. I wish I had taken more. Easy way to add calories to a meal. 
                                              http://www.wildernessfamilynaturals.com/product/CMP1.php

                                            • John
                                              Do you have the nutritional data/label on this powder by chance? I didn t see it on the web site.
                                              Message 22 of 30 , Feb 3, 2014
                                                Do you have the nutritional data/label on this powder by chance?  I didn't see it on the web site. 

                                                On Feb 3, 2014, at 5:09 PM, <mojavemoon@...> wrote:

                                                 

                                                Before I left on my JMT hike last summer, my sister gave me a small sampling of coconut milk powder from Wilderness Family Naturals (the best company for coconut products I've seen so far). It is fairly light weight and full of fat and calories and SO yummy. I wish I had taken more. Easy way to add calories to a meal. 
                                                http://www.wildernessfamilynaturals.com/product/CMP1.php

                                              • John Ladd
                                                I d really urge people to use this thread for your biggest mistake. Mistakes are very educational. The hiking social networks are full of good ideas. It s
                                                Message 23 of 30 , Feb 3, 2014
                                                  I'd really urge people to use this thread for your biggest mistake. Mistakes are very educational. The hiking social networks are full of good ideas. It's harder to find people admitting that they tried an idea and it proved to be a bad one. 

                                                  John Curran Ladd
                                                  1616 Castro Street
                                                  San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
                                                  415-648-9279
                                                • Robert
                                                  Back in 2000 I was going with some friends on a section hike of the JMT from Onion Valley to Mammoth via Duck Lake, and I left my hiking shoes at home!
                                                  Message 24 of 30 , Feb 3, 2014
                                                    Back in 2000' I was going with some friends on a section hike of the JMT from Onion Valley to
                                                    Mammoth via Duck Lake, and I left my hiking shoes at home! Fortunately, I use
                                                    trail runners and I was able to pick up a new pair in Mammoth Lakes, but they
                                                    fit slightly different than my normal trail runners, and I paid a price! They
                                                    actually worked well for the first couple days, but by day 3 I was getting hot
                                                    spots where my feet weren't used to having friction. I managed to keep the
                                                    blisters manageable, but they were easily the worst ones I have ever had! My
                                                    hiking partner had cloth athletic tape that he let me use, and it was my first
                                                    lesson on caring for my feet by pre-taping hot spots and how to properly lance,
                                                    treat, and tape existing blisters. It was a 'knucklehead' move on my part, but I
                                                    learned some 'on the fly' foot care techniques, and prompted me to do a lot more research on foot care once I got home, and those lessons learned have stuck with me!

                                                    --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Roleigh Martin <marti124@...> wrote:
                                                    >
                                                    > My memory is weak here but I think the more prone to fail zippers are #3 zippers. I have had same problem. I have done 2 things differently. One when I order a custom made tent I offer to pay more for the next more rugged zipper which I think is a #5. Second when I have a tent zipper replaced I go for the # 5 zipper.
                                                    >
                                                    > Sent from my iPhone
                                                    > See my Google Profile for interesting research links:
                                                    > http://tinyurl.com/3vnolh8
                                                    >
                                                    > > On Jan 25, 2014, at 10:00 AM, brucelem12 <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                                                    > >
                                                    > > "Hiking the JMT - One thing I wished I had done differently" (Good idea John.)
                                                    > >
                                                    > > Last year I regretted not having pliers ( i.e. as part of a mini multi tool ).
                                                    > > Both zippers failed on my Zpacks Hexamid, and I had no way to tighten / fix them. I always have a few safety pins in my repair kit, but still a nuisance...especially since I'm now at the age where I have to get up about 3 times every night.
                                                    > > (By the way, I still think that tent is excellent...just part of the tradeoff of super light gear, (super light/small zippers widening after several seasons use in this case). A quick pinch of tiny pliers fixes them fine.)
                                                    > > Bruce
                                                    > >
                                                    > >
                                                    >
                                                  • debrabrownbear
                                                    Not realizing that by day three I d be so sick of Clif bars and healthy trail mix that I was leaving about 1,000 calories a day uneaten in my pack. I would
                                                    Message 25 of 30 , Feb 4, 2014
                                                      Not realizing that by day three I'd be so sick of Clif bars and healthy trail mix that I was leaving about 1,000 calories a day uneaten in my pack. I would have killed for a Snickers bar. This year I'm bringing a variety of candy bars I know I will eat! Debra
                                                    • bperluss
                                                      Sorry about that, John. I guess I misunderstood the intent. To the other John, there is a photo of the label at the lower left hand corner on the website. You
                                                      Message 26 of 30 , Feb 4, 2014

                                                        Sorry about that, John. I guess I misunderstood the intent. To the other John, there is a photo of the label at the lower left hand corner on the website. You can enlarge it. 


                                                        Mistakes? Plenty. #1, I wish I took down booties. It would have made a huge difference on the colder nights and they don't weigh too much. 

                                                      • John
                                                        Ah, missed that image in the corner - thank you! Looks to be a good trail food supplement. Now if they could only make Nutella powder...;) BTW, Do any of you
                                                        Message 27 of 30 , Feb 4, 2014
                                                        Ah, missed that image in the corner - thank you!  Looks to be a good trail food supplement. 

                                                        Now if they could only make Nutella powder...;)

                                                        BTW, Do any of you with dehydrating skills think that it can be done with Nutella?  Spreading it onto parchment paper maybe to form a " brittle" that can be crushed into powder?  Then rehydrated back into a spread (on-trail) that will make any boring Cliff Bar palatable again!

                                                        image.jpeg
                                                        Have a good day!
                                                        John M


                                                        On Feb 4, 2014, at 7:59 AM, <mojavemoon@...> wrote:

                                                         

                                                        Sorry about that, John. I guess I misunderstood the intent. To the other John, there is a photo of the label at the lower left hand corner on the website. You can enlarge it. 


                                                        Mistakes? Plenty. #1, I wish I took down booties. It would have made a huge difference on the colder nights and they don't weigh too much. 

                                                      • HELENE MUSSUTO
                                                        If you want to try something very yummy and nutritional, give JEM butters a try. Yes they are very expensive..you re worth it. Another option is to add a 1 tsp
                                                        Message 28 of 30 , Feb 4, 2014
                                                        If you want to try something very yummy and nutritional, give JEM butters a try. Yes they are very expensive..you're worth it.
                                                        Another option is to add a 1 tsp to 1 tbsp of  maca root powder to a cup of dried milk.

                                                        http://www.jemraw.com/product-nutritional-information/cinnamon-red-maca-almond-butter-nutritional-information/


                                                        On Tuesday, February 4, 2014 8:25 AM, John <jmaddog1082@...> wrote:
                                                        Ah, missed that image in the corner - thank you!  Looks to be a good trail food supplement. 

                                                        Now if they could only make Nutella powder...;)

                                                        BTW, Do any of you with dehydrating skills think that it can be done with Nutella?  Spreading it onto parchment paper maybe to form a " brittle" that can be crushed into powder?  Then rehydrated back into a spread (on-trail) that will make any boring Cliff Bar palatable again!

                                                        image.jpeg
                                                        Have a good day!
                                                        John M


                                                        On Feb 4, 2014, at 7:59 AM, <mojavemoon@...> wrote:

                                                         
                                                        Sorry about that, John. I guess I misunderstood the intent. To the other John, there is a photo of the label at the lower left hand corner on the website. You can enlarge it. 

                                                        Mistakes? Plenty. #1, I wish I took down booties. It would have made a huge difference on the colder nights and they don't weigh too much. 


                                                      • John Ladd
                                                        It has so little water content (under 10%) that I doubt it would be worth it to dehydrate it. At 150+ cal/oz it is pretty efficient as is. I also think it
                                                        Message 29 of 30 , Feb 4, 2014
                                                          It has so little water content (under 10%) that I doubt it would be worth it to dehydrate it. At 150+ cal/oz it is pretty efficient as is. I also think it would be hard to re-hydrate in the field. I often bring it, though I prefer to mix it with a bunch of nuts (usually almonds or macadamias) and eat both nuts and nutella together.

                                                          John Curran Ladd
                                                          1616 Castro Street
                                                          San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
                                                          415-648-9279


                                                          On Tue, Feb 4, 2014 at 8:24 AM, John <jmaddog1082@...> wrote:
                                                          Ah, missed that image in the corner - thank you!  Looks to be a good trail food supplement. 

                                                          Now if they could only make Nutella powder...;)

                                                          BTW, Do any of you with dehydrating skills think that it can be done with Nutella?  Spreading it onto parchment paper maybe to form a " brittle" that can be crushed into powder?  Then rehydrated back into a spread (on-trail) that will make any boring Cliff Bar palatable again!

                                                          image.jpeg
                                                          Have a good day!
                                                          John M


                                                          On Feb 4, 2014, at 7:59 AM, <mojavemoon@...> wrote:

                                                           

                                                          Sorry about that, John. I guess I misunderstood the intent. To the other John, there is a photo of the label at the lower left hand corner on the website. You can enlarge it. 


                                                          Mistakes? Plenty. #1, I wish I took down booties. It would have made a huge difference on the colder nights and they don't weigh too much. 


                                                        • jmthodge
                                                          Zoom in on the images and it is there ... 3rd one in the set. By my calculations per ounce it is: 208 calories 19g fat 5.7g carbs 3.8g protein Which is a
                                                          Message 30 of 30 , Feb 4, 2014

                                                            Zoom in on the images and it is there ... 3rd one in the set.  By my calculations per ounce it is:  


                                                            208 calories

                                                            19g fat

                                                            5.7g carbs

                                                            3.8g protein


                                                            Which is a little different from the Grace brand I have at home which is

                                                            193 calories

                                                            17g fat

                                                            8.5g carbs

                                                            2.8g protein

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